Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author or Editor: James P. Thompson x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Summary

Appendicular osteosarcoma was diagnosed in 30 dogs. Fifteen dogs were treated by limb amputation alone, and 15 dogs were treated by limb amputation followed by 2 doses of cisplatin given iv approximately 2 and 7 weeks after limb removal. Mean survival time after limb amputation alone ± sd was 190 ± 138 days (median, 168 days); 7 dogs survived longer than 6 months, and 3 dogs survived more than 1 year. Fourteen of 15 dogs treated by amputation and administration of cisplatin survived a mean of 315 ± 158 days (median, 290 days) after amputation, and 1 dog was still alive at 1,095 days; 13 dogs survived longer than 6 months and 5 dogs survived more than 1 year. Survival time was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in dogs given cisplatin.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives

To produce monoclonal antibodies (MAB) with specificity for the heavy chain of macaw IgG; to incorporate these MAB into an ELISA to measure IgG responses of macaws inoculated with bovine serum albumin (BSA); and to evaluate the antigenicity of BSA in Blue and Gold Macaws.

Animals

Four 1-year-old Blue and Gold Macaws, 2 males and 2 females.

Procedure

1 male and 1 female 1 were randomly assigned to each of 2 study groups. Group-1 birds were inoculated with 200 μg of BSA on days 0, 14, 28, and 42. Group-2 birds were inoculated with 200 μg of BSA on days 0 and 28. Blood was collected weekly for measurement of anti-BSA titer. Hybridomas were prepared from mice immunized with Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) IgG purified by salt precipitation and gel chromatography. Specificity for IgG of Scarlet Macaw and other macaw species was confirmed by ELISA and western blot analysis. Hybridoma HL544 was cloned and the antibody purified. Following biotinylation, MAB HL544 was incorporated into an ELISA that measured IgG responses of macaws inoculated with BSA.

Results

Adult Blue and Gold Macaws developed strong primary and secondary anti-BSA antibody titers 14 days after inoculation with 200 μg of BSA. An inoculation interval of 28 days resulted in stronger secondary responses than an interval of only 14 days.

Conclusions

MAB specific for macaw immunoglobulins can be used in ELISA to evaluate the humoral immune responses of macaws. 1-year-old Blue and Gold Macaws developed strong anti-BSA titer when inoculated with 200 μg of BSA. An inoculation interval of 28 days resulted in stronger secondary responses than did an interval of only 14 days.

Clinical Relevance

These MAB, the first reported to have specificity for a psittacine antibody class, will be useful in the evaluation of psittacine antibody responses and in the development of psittacine diagnostic assays. (Am J Vet Res 1996; 57:1157-1161)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine features of an early fetal loss (EFL) syndrome and evaluate potential risk factors for EFL in Thoroughbred broodmares on 4 farms in central Kentucky.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—288 pregnant broodmares.

Procedure—Year-2001 breeding records for 288 Thoroughbred broodmares were examined. Early fetal loss was defined as loss of a fetus that was viable at ≥ 40 days of gestation but was subsequently lost by 5 months of gestation.

Results—Overall 2001 EFL rate was 25% (73/288), median gestational age at time of fetal loss was 77 days, and median date of loss was May 7. Mares on 1 farm had significantly fewer fetal losses (5%) than mares on the other 3 farms (26 to 35%). Fetal losses were higher for maiden (42%) and barren (42%) mares than for foaling mares (18%). Fetal losses were greater in young than in older mares. Effects of broodmare farm, mare age, and reproductive status were all significant. Fetal losses were not associated with sire used for mating or stud farm.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Greatest risk for EFL occurred during the period from late April to May (ie, in mares bred during February through March). Higher incidence of EFL in maiden and barren mares and lower incidence of EFL on 1 farm suggest management or environmental influences may have affected outcome. Risk factors that should be investigated include environmental differences among farms and differences in management procedures used for lactating versus nonlactating mares. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1828–1830)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To document the maternal transfer of IgG antibodies from Blue and Gold Macaw hens to chicks via the egg; to measure serum IgG half-life in macaw chicks; and to measure the ability of 2- to 10-week-old macaw chicks to generate primary and secondary IgG responses.

Procedure

4 adult Blue and Gold Macaw hens were inoculated with 200 μg of bovine serum albumin (BSA) every 21 days throughout the breeding season. Eggs laid by these hens were incubator hatched to eliminate the possibility of antibody transfer through crop secretions during feeding. Anti-BSA titer was measured just prior to each inoculation in hens and in chicks from 14 to 42 days of age. 1 chick from each of 5 macaw clutches hatched to nonimmunized hens was assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups. Group-1 chicks were inoculated with 200 μg of BSA at 2 and 6 weeks of age. Group-2 chicks were inoculated with 200 μg of BSA at 6 and 10 weeks of age. Anti-BSA titer was measured weekly for 8 weeks after primary inoculation.

Blood samples were centrifuged, and serum was harvested and frozen at −85 C until analyzed. Anti-BSA IgG titers were measured by ELISA. In the maternal transfer experiment, an exponential decay model was used to calculate the half-life of BSA antibodies in chicks. In the BSA antibody response experiment, comparison of primary and secondary anti-BSA responses of 2- and 6- week-old chicks was performed, using a two-way repeated measures ANOVA, with significance set at P < 0.05.

Results

Hens maintained high anti-BSA titer throughout the breeding season. Maternal transfer of anti-BSA IgG antibodies was documented in all 7 chicks. Anti-BSA titer in chicks decreased in exponential fashion with an average serum IgG half-life of 3.85 days. By 42 days of age, antibodies to BSA were virtually undetectable in all chicks. The primary antibody response of 6-week-old chicks was significantly higher than that of 2-week-old chicks (P = 0.016). No significant difference was observed in the magnitude of the secondary antibody responses between these age groups. Peak anti-BSA IgG antibody responses were reached by 14 days after primary and secondary immunization. Chicks of both age groups generated lower anti-BSA IgG titer than did adult Blue and Gold Macaws.

Conclusions

Blue and Gold Macaw hens transfer IgG antibodies to their chicks through the egg. The half-life of IgG in newly hatched chicks is approximately 3.85 days. 6-week-old chicks develop higher anti-BSA titers than do 2-week-old chicks, but significantly lower titers than do adult macaws.

Clinical Relevance

Information on the nondomestic avian immune system will be useful in the development of vaccination and other preventive health programs for psittacine birds. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1162-1167)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To identify correlations between ultrasonographic findings and specific hepatic diseases in cats.

Design

Retrospective study.

Sample Population

Medical records of 72 cats with a histopathologic diagnosis of hepatic disease and diagnostic-quality abdominal ultrasonograms between 1985 and 1997.

Procedure

Abdominal ultrasonographic findings in 72 cats with histologically confirmed hepatic disease (hepatic lipidosis excluded) were reviewed. Rather than attempt to combine individual ultrasonographic findings with specific hepatic diseases, 2 classification trees were created as models to correlate certain groups of abnormalities with specific hepatic diseases or with malignant and benign lesions of the liver. Sensitivity and specificity of classification trees were calculated.

Results

Use of a classification tree resulted in correct classification of malignant versus benign hepatic lesions in 88.9% of cats that had hepatic disease (sensitivity, 90.7%; specificity, 86.1 %). Use of a classification tree to distinguish individual types of hepatic diseases resulted in mostly accurate classification of hepatic lymphosarcoma (sensitivity, 70.5%; specificity, 98.2%), cholangitis-cholangiohepatitis syndrome (sensitivity, 87%; specificity, 90%), and benign lesions of the liver (sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 86.4%). Criteria that helped most in differentiating among various hepatic diseases were abnormalities within other organs (spleen, lymph nodes) and appearance of the hepatic portal system. A correlation was not found between focal or multifocal appearance of hepatic lesions and specific hepatic diseases.

Clinical Implications

Use of classification trees to distinguish among specific hepatic diseases or between malignant and benign hepatic lesions provides potentially useful algorithms for ultrasonographic evaluation of cats with hepatic disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:94-98)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

After surgical removal of a primary intranasal neoplasm an implant device, designed to deliver 192iridium (192Ir) brachytherapy, was positioned in the nasal cavity of 8 dogs. Ribbons containing 192Ir seeds were placed in the device, using an afterloading technique. Dosimetry, to a dose of 7,000 to 10,000 centiGray (cGy), was calculated to encompass the site previously occupied by the tumor and a 1-cm margin of surrounding normal tissue. The quantity of 192Ir implanted varied between 16.69 and 100.80 mg of radium equivalent. The duration of implantation ranged from 90 to 168 hours. All dogs tolerated the implant well, but had a mucoid nasal discharge after radiotherapy. The implant device allowed rapid application and removal of the radioactive ribbons. Mean (± sd) radiation exposure to each radiotherapist during seed loading and unloading was 14.4 (± 5.3) and 4.5 (± 0.9) mrem, respectively. A uniform dose distribution around the intranasal implant device was achieved; however, dogs that received doses in excess of 9,400 cGy at the dorsolateral surface of the nose and/or hard palate had bone and soft tissue necrosis between 70 and 120 days after treatment. One dog was euthanatized 50 days after treatment because of metastatic disease, and 2 dogs were euthanatized because of local tumor recurrence at 125 and 212 days. Death, considered unrelated to treatment, occurred in 1 dog that was euthanatized 27 days after treatment and in 3 dogs that died 30, 93, and 456 days after treatment. Necropsy was performed on 3 of these dogs and evidence of intranasal neoplasia was not observed. One dog remained disease-free at 587 days after treatment.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Long-term follow-up information pertaining to 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone was collected from 17 veterinary institutions. The majority (72.5%) of dogs died or were euthanatized because of problems documented to be related to metastases. The first clinically apparent sites of metastasis were the lungs (60.8% of total), the skeleton (5.2%), or both (4.6%). A Kaplan-Meier survivorship distribution was plotted on the basis of available survival time data in all 162 dogs. The mean and median survival times were estimated to be 19.8 and 19.2 weeks, respectively, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 11.5 and 2.0% respectively.

Statistically significant relationships were not found between survival time and reporting institution, gender, site of primary tumor, whether the primary tumor was proximally or distally located, whether the primary tumor was located in the forelimb or hind limb, whether presurgical biopsy was performed, and whether death was tumor related. A significant (P < 0.01) quadratic relationship was found between age and survival time. Survival time was longest in dogs 7 to 10 years old and was shorter in older and younger dogs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association