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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary:

Over a 3-year period, proventriculotomy was performed on 18 ostriches to relieve impaction of the proventriculus. Diagnosis was confirmed by abdominal palpation, abdominal radiography, and in some cases, exploratory proventriculotomy. In addition to proventriculotomy, an esophagotomy was performed in 5 birds that were debilitated to allow forcefeeding during the postoperative period. The median age of ostriches treated surgically for proventricular impaction was 7.5 months (range, 3 months to 18 years).

Impactions consisted of sand, rocks, or gravel in combination with grass, leaves, wood, or other fibrous materials. In 7 birds, small pieces of wire or nails were also removed from the proventriculus. In 1 bird, a large metal punch was removed via the proventriculotomy.

Six ostriches died at the hospital in the immediate postoperative period. Four of these died within 24 hours of surgery. All 4 birds were emaciated and in a severely weakened condition at admission, and they continued to deteriorate after surgery. One bird died 8 days after surgery as a result of complications associated with a septic joint unrelated to the proventriculotomy procedure. Another bird was euthanatized 6 days after surgery because its condition failed to improve and the owners did not want to pursue further treatment because of expense. Follow-up information was obtained for 12 surviving ostriches 1 week to 29 months (median, 5.5 months) after they were discharged from the hospital. Four of the 12 birds died within 30 days of discharge from the hospital. The remaining 8 birds (44%) were alive at follow-up evaluation (median, 10.5 months after surgery; range, 5 to 29 months). In the birds that survived long-term, complications associated with the proventriculotomy or esophagotomy were not observed.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 12-year-old castrated male Labrador Retriever was evaluated for clinical signs associated with colorectal obstruction.

Clinical Findings—The dog had a 2-week history of tenesmus and hematochezia. On rectal examination, an annular colorectal mass was palpable extending orad into the pelvic canal. The original diagnosis of the colorectal mass was a mucosal adenoma. The dog was maintained on a low-residue diet and fecal softeners for a period of 13 months after initial diagnosis. At that time, medical management was no longer effective.

Treatment and Outcome—Placement of a colonic stent was chosen to palliate the clinical signs associated with colorectal obstruction. By use of fluoroscopic and colonoscopic guidance, a nitinol stent was placed intraluminally to open the obstructed region. Placement of the stent resulted in improvement of clinical signs, although tenesmus and obstipation occurred periodically after stent placement. At 212 days after stent placement, the patient had extensive improvement in clinical signs with minimal complications; however, clinical signs became severe at 238 days after stent placement, and the dog was euthanized. Histologic evaluation of the rectal tumor from samples obtained during necropsy revealed that the tumor had undergone malignant transformation to a carcinoma in situ.

Clinical Relevance—A stent was successfully placed in the colon and rectum to relieve obstruction associated with a tumor originally diagnosed as a benign neoplasm. Placement of colorectal stents may be an option for the palliation of colorectal obstruction secondary to neoplastic disease; however, clinical signs may persist, and continuation of medical management may be necessary.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A study was conducted to identify the clinical signs associated with impaction of the proventriculus in ostriches, to identify diagnostic aids, and to develop a surgical procedure for management of the disorder. Clinical signs indicating the need for surgical intervention included chronic inappetance, a change in fecal consistency or production, dehydration, weight loss, and failure to respond to laxatives. Diagnosis of impacted proventriculus was by abdominal radiography and external palpation. Impactions were caused by sand and rocks (5 ostriches), hay and sand (1 ostrich), and leaves (1 ostrich). After surgery, 5 of the ostriches were clinically normal within (mean) 1 week. One ostrich failed to regain a normal appetite until 2 weeks after surgery, and one juvenile ostrich died after surgery. Of the 6 ostriches that survived, 1 died 1 week after discharge from the hospital. The remaining birds survived without redevelopment of impaction.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association