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  • Author or Editor: James L. Yeatts x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the elimination kinetics of ceftiofur hydrochloride in milk after intramammary administration in lactating dairy cows.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—5 lactating dairy cows.

Procedure—After collection of baseline milk samples, 300 mg (6 mL) of ceftiofur was infused into the left front and right rear mammary gland quarters of each cow. Approximately 12 hours later, an additional 300 mg of ceftiofur was administered into the same mammary gland quarters after milking. Milk samples were collected from each mammary gland quarter every 12 hours for 10 days. Concentrations of ceftiofur and its metabolites in each milk sample were determined to assess the rate of ceftiofur elimination.

Results—Although there were considerable variations among mammary gland quarters and individual cows, ceftiofur concentrations in milk from all treated mammary gland quarters were less than the tolerance (0.1 µg/mL) set by the FDA by 168 hours (7 days) after the last intramammary administration of ceftiofur. No drug concentrations were detected in milk samples beyond this period. Ceftiofur was not detected in any milk samples from nontreated mammary gland quarters throughout the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ceftiofur administered by the intramammary route as an extralabel treatment for mastitis in dairy cows reaches concentrations in milk greater than the tolerance set by the FDA. Results indicated that milk from treated mammary gland quarters should be discarded for a minimum of 7 days after intramammary administration of ceftiofur. Elimination of ceftiofur may be correlated with milk production, and cows producing smaller volumes of milk may have prolonged withdrawal times. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1827–1830)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine elimination kinetics of tilmicosin in milk following intramammary administration in lactating dairy cattle.

Design—Prospective pharmacokinetic study.

Animals—6 lactating dairy cows.

Procedures—Following collection of baseline milk samples, 1,200 mg (4 mL) of tilmicosin was infused into the left front and right rear mammary glands of each cow. Approximately 12 hours later, an additional 1,200 mg of tilmicosin was infused into the left front and right rear glands after milking. Milk samples were then collected from each gland at milking time for 40 days. Concentration of tilmicosin was determined by means of ultraperformance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and a milk withdrawal interval for tilmicosin was calculated on the basis of the tolerance limit method.

Results—Although there was considerable variation between glands, concentration of tilmicosin was high in milk from treated glands and had a long half-life in treated and untreated glands. Tilmicosin was detected in all treated glands for the entire 40-day study period and was detected in untreated glands for approximately 30 to 35 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings indicated that tilmicosin should not be administered by the intramammary route in lactating dairy cows. Milk from all glands of any cows accidentally treated should be discarded for a minimum of 82 days following intramammary administration.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association