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Abstract

Case Description—A 13-year-old female intact Moluccan cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) was evaluated because of coelomic distention, presumed to be secondary to an abdominal hernia. The patient also had a history of rapid weight gain and polyuria and polydipsia.

Clinical Findings—Ultrasonography was used to confirm the existence of a pseudohernia that appeared to contain the small intestines, pancreas, and reproductive tract. Results of plasma biochemical analysis revealed hyperglycemia, hypophosphatemia, and high nonfasting bile acid concentrations and aspartate aminotransferase activity. A CBC revealed a relative heterophilia with a concomitant lymphopenia and mild monocytosis. Histologic evaluation of a liver biopsy specimen indicated chronic hepatic lipidosis. Despite a strong clinical suspicion of hyperadrenocorticism, ACTH stimulation test results were equivocal.

Treatment and Outcome—The pseudohernia was strengthened with a prolene mesh. Despite ongoing medical and surgical care, the patient developed complications associated with the herniorrhaphy and was euthanatized. The clinical suspicion of hyperadrenocorticism was confirmed on the basis of histologic evaluation of the pituitary gland by use of special stains.

Clinical Relevance—To our knowledge, pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism has not been previously confirmed in Psittaciformes. The condition should be considered in birds with clinical signs consistent with those observed in mammals. For the cockatoo of this report, ACTH stimulation test results were equivocal and additional diagnostic tests should be developed for avian patients.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was examined because of a 3-week history of intermittent seizures, signs of depression, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia.

Clinical Findings—Plasma biochemical analysis confirmed hyperphosphatemia (17.7 mg/dL) and low concentrations of total (4.3 mg/dL) and ionized (0.49 mmol/L) calcium. Serum parathyroid hormone concentration (2.30 pmol/L) was low or in the low part of the reference interval.

Treatment and Outcome—Calcium gluconate was administered (2.0 mg/kg/h [0.9 mg/lb/h], IV), followed by a transition to administration of calcium carbonate (53 mg/kg [24.1 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) and dihydrotachysterol (0.02 mg/kg/d [0.009 mg/lb/d], PO). Attitude of the ferret improved and seizures ceased as blood calcium concentrations increased. The ferret was reexamined because of seizures approximately 1 year after oral maintenance administration of dihydrotachysterol and calcium was initiated. The ferret responded well to emergency and long-term treatment but then was lost to follow-up monitoring. The ferret died approximately 2 years after the initial evaluation and treatment. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was diagnosed during necropsy, but the parathyroid glands could not be identified.

Clinical Relevance—To the authors’ knowledge, primary hypoparathyroidism has not previously been reported in a ferret. The condition should be considered for ferrets with hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia without azotemia. Treatment with dihydrotachysterol and oral supplementation of calcium appeared to be a viable option for long-term management.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was evaluated with a 2-week history of vomiting and anorexia. Four days prior, the patient became refractory to medical management. The kangaroo was admitted for diagnostic testing and treatment including whole body CT, blood work, and emergency laparotomy.

Clinical Findings—CT findings of a severely enlarged stomach, splenic displacement, and a whirl sign were indicative of mesenteric volvulus with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Contrast enhancement of abdominal viscera suggested intact arterial blood supply; however, compression of the caudal vena cava and portal vein indicated venous obstruction. Results of preoperative blood work suggested biliary stasis without evidence of inflammation. Additionally, a tooth root abscess was diagnosed on the basis of results of CT.

Treatment and Outcome—Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of mesenteric volvulus and GDV. The volvuli were corrected by clockwise derotation, and a gastropexy was performed. Tissue samples were obtained from the spleen and liver for evaluation. The kangaroo recovered from surgery, and the abscessed tooth was extracted 6 days later. Eight days after initial evaluation, the kangaroo was discharged.

Clinical Relevance—In the present report, the CT whirl sign was used to diagnose volvulus of the abdominal viscera, which suggests that this diagnostic indicator has utility in veterinary patients. Mesenteric volvulus with GDV was successfully treated in a nondomestic species. The tooth root abscess, a common condition in macropods, may explain the historic episodes of anorexia reported by the owner and may have contributed to the development of mesenteric volvulus and GDV in this kangaroo.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 5.5-year-old sexually intact female African Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) was evaluated for a 1-year history of pronounced polyuria and polydipsia. The bird also had a 1-month history of signs of mild depression and mydriasis.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed a thin body condition and incomplete bilateral mydriasis. Other examination findings as well as CBC and screening radiography results were unremarkable. Plasma biochemical analysis revealed mild hypernatremia. The bird had a 3.3% loss in body weight over 170 minutes during a water deprivation test, and urine osmolality remained low. After IM administration of 0.9 μg of desmopressin, the rate of weight loss decreased substantially and urine osmolality increased 300% over the following 200 minutes.

Treatment and Outcome—Initial attempts to treat the bird with orally administered desmopressin failed to correct the polydipsia and polyuria. Ultimately, IM administration of 24 μg of desmopressin/kg (10.9 μg/lb) every 12 hours yielded a noticeable reduction in water consumption and urine production over a 6- to 8-hour period. Eight months later, the bird was returned for a recheck examination, at which time it was in good health and continued to respond to the medication. Despite continued response to the medication, right-sided internal ophthalmoparesis was detected 16 months after the initial diagnosis.

Clinical Relevance—To the authors' knowledge, central diabetes insipidus in birds has not been reported. The condition should be considered in birds with clinical signs of disease similar to those in mammals. Long-term IM administration of desmopressin may be a viable treatment option.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of oral administration of melatonin on clinical signs, tumor size, and serum steroid hormone concentrations in ferrets with adrenocortical disease.

Design—Noncontrolled clinical trial.

Animals—10 adult ferrets with clinical signs of adrenocortical disease (confirmed via serum steroid hormone concentration assessments).

Procedures—Melatonin (0.5 mg) was administered orally to ferrets once daily for 1 year. At 4-month intervals, a complete physical examination; abdominal ultrasonographic examination (including adrenal gland measurement); CBC; serum biochemical analyses; and assessment of serum estradiol, androstenedione, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations were performed. Serum prolactin and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were evaluated at the first, second, and last examinations, and serum cortisol concentration was evaluated at the first and last examinations.

Results—Daily oral administration of melatonin greatly affected clinical signs of adrenocortical disease in ferrets; changes included hair regrowth, decreased pruritus, increased activity level and appetite, and decreased vulva or prostate size. Mean width of the abnormally large adrenal glands was significantly increased after the 12-month treatment period. Recurrence of clinical signs was detected in 6 ferrets at the 8-month evaluation. Compared with pretreatment values, serum 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and prolactin concentrations were significantly increased and decreased after 12 months, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that melatonin is a useful, easily administered, palliative treatment to decrease clinical signs associated with adrenocortical disease in ferrets, and positive effects of daily treatment were evident for at least an 8-month period. Oral administration of melatonin did not decrease adrenal gland tumor growth in treated ferrets.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe morbidity, function, outcome, and owner satisfaction associated with limb amputation in domestic rabbits.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—34 client-owned domestic rabbits.

Procedures—Medical records of domestic rabbits undergoing limb amputation for any cause between 2000 and 2009 were reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival rate and median survival time, and variables were analyzed for relationship to risk of morbidity resulting in euthanasia and to outcome (survival vs nonsurvival [death or euthanasia]). Owners were interviewed to determine satisfaction with outcome of the procedure.

Results—28 rabbits underwent pelvic limb amputation, and 6 underwent thoracic limb amputation. At the last follow-up, 18 rabbits were dead, 9 were alive, and 7 were lost to follow-up. Median overall survival time was 720 days (range, 4 to 3,250 days). Acute and delayed or chronic complications were observed in 22 of 34 and 19 of 32 rabbits, respectively, most commonly difficulty ambulating, hygiene issues, and pododermatitis (cutaneous ulcers at the hock). Six rabbits were euthanized because of complications at a median of 104 days (range, 4 to 399 days) after surgery. Risk of morbidity resulting in euthanasia increased with heavier body weight and concurrent disease affecting ambulation at the time of amputation. Weight, age, and pododermatitis at the time of amputation were significantly negatively associated with survival time. Thirty-one (91%) owners were satisfied with the outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although limb amputation was tolerated by most rabbits and most owners were satisfied, complications resulted in death in 6 of 34 (18%) rabbits, and 19 of 32 (59%) developed chronic complications. Amputation in heavy rabbits or those with concurrent pododermatitis, musculoskeletal disease, or neurologic disease should be considered carefully. Because of the small sample size and retrospective nature of this study, results should be interpreted as exploratory and hypothesis generating.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association