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Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old castrated male Boxer and a 10-year-old spayed female Yorkshire Terrier were evaluated because of dyspnea. In both dogs, the dyspnea persisted after elongated soft palate resection.

Clinical Findings—Laryngoscopic examination revealed caudal displacement of the epiglottis into the rima glottidis in both dogs. Excessive mobility of the epiglottis during respiration with episodic obstruction of the rima glottidis by the epiglottis was observed during fluoroscopic examination.

Treatment and Outcome—The epiglottis of both dogs was fixed in a horizontal plane by resection of a band of oral mucosa at the base of the epiglottis and closure of the mucosal defect with sutures. Fixation of the epiglottis resolved the dyspnea in both dogs.

Clinical Relevance—Excessive mobility of the epiglottis can predispose to glottic obstruction and cause dyspnea in dogs. Fixation of the epiglottis in a horizontal plane may resolve dyspnea caused by epiglottic retroversion in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog (dog 1) and a 13-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog (dog 2) were evaluated because of spontaneous pneumothorax.

Clinical Findings—Both dogs had decreased bronchovesicular sounds with coughing, tachypnea, cyanosis, lethargy, or a combination of these clinical signs. Radiographic examination revealed pneumothorax in both dogs and consolidation of a lung lobe in dog 2. Pneumothorax was alleviated following thoracocentesis in both dogs but recurred.

Treatment and Outcome—Dog 1 was initially treated by placement of a thoracostomy tube but underwent thoracotomy when pneumothorax recurred after tube removal; left caudal lung lobectomy was performed because a ruptured bulla was suspected, and a pulmonary bulla was histologically confirmed. Dog 2 underwent thoracotomy with left caudal lung lobectomy and partial removal of the left cranial lung lobe; diffuse pulmonary emphysema was diagnosed. This dog underwent a second surgery for right caudal lung lobectomy because of torsion. When pneumothorax recurred and additional surgery was not considered feasible, pleural access ports were placed in both dogs for repeated removal of air from the thoracic cavity. Ports were used clinically for 17 days in dog 1 and 14 days in dog 2. Dog 1 successfully underwent another surgery when pneumothorax recurred 18 days after port placement but was euthanized 17 months later when dyspnea and tachypnea recurred. Pneumothorax had not recurred further in dog 2 twenty-three months after port placement.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that pleural access ports may have a role in the management of spontaneous pneumothorax in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration could be used to detect gallbladder rupture (GBR) prior to surgery in dogs undergoing cholecystectomy for treatment of gallbladder mucocele (GBM).

ANIMALS

45 dogs that underwent cholecystectomy because of GBM at a companion animal referral hospital from 2017 to 2020.

PROCEDURES

Electronic medical records were reviewed, and dogs were included if serum CRP concentration had been measured within 24 hours prior to cholecystectomy. Dogs were grouped as to whether the gallbladder was found to be ruptured or intact during surgery. Accuracy of using preoperative CRP concentration to predict GBR was compared with accuracy of abdominal ultrasonography and other preoperative blood tests.

RESULTS

GBR was present in 15 dogs at the time of surgery. Median preoperative CRP concentration was significantly higher in dogs with GBR (15.1 mg/dL; interquartile range, 7.4 to 16.8 mg/dL) than in dogs with an intact gallbladder (2.65 mg/dL; interquartile range, 0.97 to 13.4 mg/dL). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of using preoperative CRP concentration to predict GBR were 100%, 67%, and 78%, respectively.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Measurement of preoperative CRP concentration provided excellent sensitivity and moderate specificity for detection of GBR in dogs undergoing cholecystectomy because of GBM. Accuracy of using preoperative CRP concentration for detection of GBR was not superior to the accuracy of preoperative abdominal ultrasonography. However, when CRP concentration was combined with results of ultrasonography, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detection of GBR were 100%, 93%, and 96%, respectively.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate long-term function of vascular access ports (VAPs) implanted in the femoral vein of dogs and cats undergoing cancer treatment.

Design—Prospective clinical study.

Animals—3 dogs and 6 cats treated via chemotherapy or radiation.

Procedures—VAPs were surgically implanted in the left femoral vein of 3 dogs and 6 cats over a 1-year period. Injection port location was alternated to either a caudal thoracic or ilial location in each patient. Duration of VAP function, ease of infusion, and ease of aspiration through the VAPs were recorded, and associated complications were assessed at each VAP use. Client satisfaction with VAP placement was evaluated by use of a questionnaire.

Results—Primary uses of the VAPs included blood sampling and delivering sedative or chemotherapeutic drugs. Median duration of successful infusion was 147 days (range, 60 to 370 days), and median duration of successful aspiration was 117 days (range, 10 to 271 days). The frequency of signs of VAP-related discomfort was low (7% of patient observations). Clients were satisfied with their decision to use VAPs. Complications included partial (n = 7) or complete (2) VAP occlusion, port migration (1), and presumptive infection (1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that VAP implantation into the femoral vein provides an acceptable means of chronic venous access in dogs and cats undergoing cancer treatment.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—3 dogs (9 to 12 years old) were evaluated because of recurrent pleural effusion that was refractory to treatment of the underlying cause.

Clinical Findings—Dogs were evaluated because of cough, dyspnea, tachypnea, or lethargy or a combination of these clinical signs. Radiography, ultrasonography, or thoracocentesis were used to confirm the presence of pleural fluid in each dog. A neoplastic cause of pleural effusion was confirmed in 2 dogs. In 1 dog, fasciitis of the mediastinum and the left parietal pleura was diagnosed, with no evidence of neoplasia.

Treatment and Outcome—Each dog was anesthestized, and thoracotomy was performed with manual perforation of the mediastinum. Permanent, subcutaneously placed vascular access ports were attached to intrathoracic, Jackson-Pratt drain tubing for repeated drainage of pleural fluid. Drains were used successfully in the 3 dogs for periods of 6 weeks, 11 weeks, and > 3 years.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggest that subcutaneous vascular access ports attached to intrathoracic drain tubing may be an effective way to remove recurrent pleural effusion in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was evaluated with a 2-week history of vomiting and anorexia. Four days prior, the patient became refractory to medical management. The kangaroo was admitted for diagnostic testing and treatment including whole body CT, blood work, and emergency laparotomy.

Clinical Findings—CT findings of a severely enlarged stomach, splenic displacement, and a whirl sign were indicative of mesenteric volvulus with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Contrast enhancement of abdominal viscera suggested intact arterial blood supply; however, compression of the caudal vena cava and portal vein indicated venous obstruction. Results of preoperative blood work suggested biliary stasis without evidence of inflammation. Additionally, a tooth root abscess was diagnosed on the basis of results of CT.

Treatment and Outcome—Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of mesenteric volvulus and GDV. The volvuli were corrected by clockwise derotation, and a gastropexy was performed. Tissue samples were obtained from the spleen and liver for evaluation. The kangaroo recovered from surgery, and the abscessed tooth was extracted 6 days later. Eight days after initial evaluation, the kangaroo was discharged.

Clinical Relevance—In the present report, the CT whirl sign was used to diagnose volvulus of the abdominal viscera, which suggests that this diagnostic indicator has utility in veterinary patients. Mesenteric volvulus with GDV was successfully treated in a nondomestic species. The tooth root abscess, a common condition in macropods, may explain the historic episodes of anorexia reported by the owner and may have contributed to the development of mesenteric volvulus and GDV in this kangaroo.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize clinical features, comorbidities, frequency of bacterial isolation, and survival time in cats with suppurative cholangitis-cholangiohepatitis syndrome (S-CCHS).

ANIMALS

168 client-owned cats with S-CCHS.

PROCEDURES

Data were prospectively (1980 to 2019) collected regarding clinical features, comorbidities, bacterial infection, illness duration, and treatments. Variables were evaluated for associations with survival time.

RESULTS

Median age of cats was 10.0 years, with no breed or sex predilection observed. Common clinical features included hyporexia (82%), hyperbilirubinemia (80%), lethargy (80%), vomiting (80%), jaundice (67%), weight loss (54%), and hypoalbuminemia (50%). Comorbidities included extrahepatic bile duct obstruction (53%), cholelithiasis (42%), cholecystitis (40%), and ductal plate malformation (44%) as well as biopsy-confirmed inflammatory bowel disease (60/68 [88%]) and pancreatitis (41/44 [93%]). Bacterial cultures were commonly positive (69%) despite prebiopsy antimicrobial administration in most cats. Of surgically confirmed choleliths, diagnostic imaging identified only 58%. Among 55 cats with “idiopathic pancreatitis,” 28 (51%) were documented to have transiting choleliths, and 20 had pancreatic biopsies confirming pancreatitis. Cholelithiasis (with or without bile duct obstruction) and cholecystectomy were associated with survival advantages. Survival disadvantages were found for leukocytosis, ≥ 2-fold increased alkaline phosphatase, and hyperbilirubinemia. Cholecystoenterostomy had no survival impact. Cats with ductal plate malformations were significantly younger at diagnosis and death than other cats. Chronic treatments with antimicrobials, S-adenosylmethionine, and ursodeoxycholic acid were common postbiopsy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

S-CCHS in cats was associated with bacterial infection and various comorbidities and may be confused with pancreatitis. Surgically correctable morbidities (ie, cholecystitis, cholecystocholelithiasis) and cholecystectomy provided a significant survival advantage.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To quantify the relative risk of intestinal dehiscence in dogs undergoing intestinal resection and anastomosis (IRA), compared with enterotomy, for surgical management of small intestinal foreign bodies, and to evaluate the association between nasogastric tube placement for early enteral nutrition (EEN) and hospitalization time.

ANIMALS

211 dogs undergoing 227 surgeries for intestinal foreign body removal.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed for dogs undergoing a single-site sutured enterotomy or IRA for foreign body intestinal obstruction between May 2008 and April 2018. Multivariable logistic regression was used to quantify the association between surgical procedure and dehiscence. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the association of nasogastric tube placement with total hospitalization time.

RESULTS

Dehiscence rates were 3.8% (7/183) and 18.2% (8/44) for enterotomy and IRA, respectively. Overall dehiscence rate for all surgeries was 6.6% (15/227). The odds of intestinal dehiscence for IRA were 6.09 times (95% CI, 1.89 to 19.58) the odds for enterotomy. An American Society of Anesthesiologists score > 3 (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.43 to 14.11) and an older age (OR, 1.02 [95% CI, 1.01 to 1.02] for each 1-month increase in age) were significantly associated with greater odds of intestinal dehiscence, regardless of surgical procedure. Placement of a nasogastric tube was not associated with intestinal dehiscence or decreased total hospitalization time when controlling for the year of surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Patients undergoing IRA were at a significantly higher risk of intestinal dehiscence, compared with patients undergoing enterotomy. Although this finding should not be used to recommend enterotomy over IRA, this information may be useful in guiding owner expectations and postoperative monitoring.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association