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  • Author or Editor: Jacqueline S. Scott x
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Summary

Pulmonary function measurements were made in control ponies and in ponies with recurrent obstructive pulmonary disease (principals) during clinical remission and during an attack of acute airway obstruction. The ponies were given β-adrenergic antagonists and agonists to determine the role of β receptors in recurrent obstructive pulmonary disease, and to determine the subtypes of β receptors mediating bronchodilation in ponies. Aerosol administration of the β antagonists, propranolol (β1 and β2), atenolol (β1), and butoxamine (β2) decreased dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and increased pulmonary resistance (RL) in the principal ponies during airway obstruction, but were without effect when the ponies were in clinical remission. Intravenous administration of atropine reversed the effect of atenolol on Cdyn and RL, but was without effect on the decrease in Cdyn and increase in RL observed after butoxamine administration. The β antagonists did not affect airway function in the control ponies. The effect of β blockade on Cdyn and RL suggests β-adrenergic activation in the central and peripheral airways of principal ponies, mediated through both β2- and β1-adrenergic receptors. The aerosol β agonists, isoproterenol (β1 and β2), and clenbuterol (β2) attenuated histamine-induced airway obstruction to a similar extent in control ponies that were given histamine iv. In addition, the β1 antagonist, atenolol, did not attenuate the bronchodilation observed with isoproterenol. We concluded that, although β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors exist in pony airways and are activated during acute airway obstruction, bronchodilation in response to β agonists in ponies seems to be mediated primarily by β2-adrenergic receptors.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the optimal intercostal space (ICS) for thoracoscopic-assisted pulmonary surgery for lung lobectomy in cats.

SAMPLE

8 cat cadavers.

PROCEDURES

Cadavers were placed in lateral recumbency. A 5-cm minithoracotomy incision was made in the middle third of ICS 4 through 7 on the left side and 4 through 8 on the right side, and a wound retractor device was placed. A camera port was made in the middle third of ICS 9. Each lung lobe was sequentially exteriorized at each respective ICS. A thoracoabdominal stapler was placed to simulate a lung lobectomy, and distance from the stapler anvil to the hilus was measured.

RESULTS

For the left cranial lung lobe, there was no significant difference in median distance from the stapler anvil to the pulmonary hilus for ICS 4 through 6. Simulated lobectomy of the left caudal lung lobe performed at ICS 5 and 6 resulted in a significantly shorter distance, compared with lobectomy performed at ICS 4 and 7. Simulated lobectomy of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes performed at ICS 4 and 5 resulted in a significantly shorter distance, compared with lobectomy performed at ICS 7. Simulated lobectomy of the accessory and right caudal lung lobes at ICS 5 and 6 resulted in a significantly shorter distance than for lobectomy performed at ICS 8.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

An optimal ICS for a minithoracotomy incision was determined for thoracoscopic-assisted lung lobectomy in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 9-year-old dog was evaluated for traumatic cervical myelopathy after a surgical attempt to realign and stabilize the C2 and C3 vertebrae.

Clinical Findings—The dog could not ventilate spontaneously and was tetraplegic; positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) was maintained. Myelography and computed tomography revealed spinal cord compression with subluxation of the C2 and C3 vertebrae and extrusion of the C2-3 intervertebral disk.

Treatment and Outcome—Surgically, the protruding disk material was removed and the vertebrae were realigned with screws and wire. For PPV, assist control ventilation in volume control mode and then in pressure control mode was used in the first 6 days; this was followed by synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation until 33 days after the injury; then only continuous positive airway pressure was provided until the dog could breathe unassisted, 37 days after the injury. Physical therapy that included passive range of motion exercises, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and functional weight-bearing positions was administered until the dog was discharged 46 days after injury; the dog was severely ataxic and tetraparetic but could walk. Therapy was continued at home, and 1 year later, the dog could run and had moderate ataxia and tetraparesis.

Clinical Relevance—Hypoventilation with tetraparesis in traumatic spinal cord injury can be successfully treated with PPV exceeding 30 days, surgery, and physical therapy.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the perioperative characteristics and outcomes of dogs undergoing laparoscopic-assisted splenectomy (LAS).

ANIMALS

136 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Multicentric retrospective study. Medical records of dogs undergoing LAS for treatment of naturally occurring splenic disease from January 1, 2014, to July 31, 2020, were reviewed. History, signalment, physical examination and preoperative diagnostic test results, procedural information, complications, duration of hospitalization, histopathologic diagnosis, and perioperative outcomes were recorded. Perioperative complications were defined using the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group – Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (VCOG-CTCAE v2) guidelines.

RESULTS

LAS was performed for treatment of a splenic mass (124/136 [91%]), immune-mediated disease (7/136 [5%]), splenomegaly (4/136 [3%]), or immune-mediated disease in conjunction with a splenic mass (1/136 [1%]). Median splenic mass size was 1.3 cm3/kg body weight. Conversion to open laparotomy occurred in 5.9% (8/136) of dogs. Complications occurred in 78 dogs, with all being grade 2 or lower. Median surgical time was 47 minutes, and median postoperative hospital stay was 28 hours. All but 1 dog survived to discharge, the exception being postoperative death due to a suspected portal vein thrombus.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In the dogs of this report, LAS was associated with low rates of major complications, morbidity, and mortality when performed for a variety of splenic pathologies. Minimally invasive surgeons can consider the LAS technique to perform total splenectomy in dogs without hemoabdomen and with spleens with modest-sized splenic masses up to 55.2 cm3/kg, with minimal rates of complications, morbidity, and mortality.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association