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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 13-year-old Labrador Retriever with a 4-cm-diameter ulcerated perianal mass and a 12-year-old Golden Retriever with a 5-cm-diameter ulcerated caudolateral abdominal mass were brought to a referral oncology practice for evaluation of the dermal masses. Both masses were resected with wide margins without reported postoperative complications. For both dogs, a diagnosis of collision tumor was made. The database of the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories at Colorado State University was searched for other examples of collision tumors in dogs.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Histologic assessment of the masses revealed collision tumors in both patients. The perianal mass was diagnosed as a perianal gland carcinoma with adjacent hemangiosarcoma. The flank mass was diagnosed as a fibrosarcoma with an adjacent mast cell tumor. The university database search of sample submissions in 2008 through 2014 for the keywords collision, admixed, or adjacent yielded 37 additional cases of dogs with malignant nontesticular collision tumors.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Both dogs were treated with surgery alone and received no adjunctive treatments. Both tumors were completely excised. There was no evidence of either local tumor recurrence or metastasis in the Labrador Retriever and the Golden Retriever at 1,009 and 433 days after surgery, respectively.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Collision tumors are rare, and there is minimal information regarding treatment recommendations and outcome for animals with collision tumors. On the basis of the 2 cases described in this report, the outcome associated with treatment of collision tumors may be similar to the expected outcome for treatment of any of the individual tumor types in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a reliable, validated questionnaire that can be used for the assessment of chronic pain and its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in dogs.

Sample Population—17 owners of dogs that had chronic pain associated with chronic degenerative joint disease and 165 other dog owners.

Procedures—Psychometric methods were used to identify relevant domains, create an item pool, select and validate items, and construct and preliminarily test a structured questionnaire. Relevant domains were identified through semi structured interviews. Descriptor-generating exercises provided the terms owners used to describe these domains and formed an item pool. A selection from this pool was validated and used to construct a questionnaire that underwent preliminary testing.

Results—The structured questionnaire contained 109 simple, familiar, descriptive terms associated with good health or chronic pain (most describing subtle aspects of behavior that owners interpreted as expressions of subjective experiences of their dogs) for 13 possible HRQL domains. Each descriptor was associated with a 7-point numeric scale.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The questionnaire was intended to facilitate rapid, sensitive, and accurate rating of a comprehensive range of relevant domains by naïve raters with minimal burden on respondents. The principles underlying the development and design of this structured questionnaire offer a novel approach to the proxy measurement of HRQL and changes in HRQL associated with chronic pain for a range of animal species.

Impact for Human Medicine—This novel approach may be applicable to other nonverbal populations (eg, young children or elderly people with cognitive impairment). (Am J Vet Res 2004;65;1077–1084)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To validate the use of a novel questionnaire as an instrument for measurement of chronic pain in dogs through its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL).

Animals—108 dogs with chronic degenerative joint disease and 26 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Questionnaire responses were subjected to factor analysis (FA) and questionnaire scores to discriminant analysis to evaluate construct validity. Questionnaire scores were used to explore the potential of this instrument for minimizing respondent bias and for evaluative purposes.

Results—FA results revealed a sensible factor structure accounting for 65% of the variance in data, with factors identifiable as domains of HRQL in dogs affected by chronic pain. Further evidence for construct validity was provided when questionnaire scores were used to discriminate, on the basis of 218 questionnaires, between dogs with clinician-awarded pain scores of 0 and dogs with pain scores ≥ 1 (88% discrimination, with 95% of no-pain group dogs and 87% of some-pain group dogs correctly categorized). Use of the questionnaire provided minimized respondent bias.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Validation of the questionnaire as an instrument for discriminative and evaluative measurements of orthopedic chronic pain through its impact on HRQL in dogs was provided. Use of the questionnaire, with further testing and refinement, may support improved clinical decision making, facilitate development of evidence-based therapeutic options for chronic diseases, and help veterinarians and owners define humane end points in dogs.

Impact for Human Medicine—Information gained here may provide improved measurements of clinical change in animal studies that use dogs with naturally occurring chronic pain to evaluate novel human treatment protocols.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the optimal intercostal space (ICS) for thoracoscopic-assisted pulmonary surgery for lung lobectomy in cats.

SAMPLE

8 cat cadavers.

PROCEDURES

Cadavers were placed in lateral recumbency. A 5-cm minithoracotomy incision was made in the middle third of ICS 4 through 7 on the left side and 4 through 8 on the right side, and a wound retractor device was placed. A camera port was made in the middle third of ICS 9. Each lung lobe was sequentially exteriorized at each respective ICS. A thoracoabdominal stapler was placed to simulate a lung lobectomy, and distance from the stapler anvil to the hilus was measured.

RESULTS

For the left cranial lung lobe, there was no significant difference in median distance from the stapler anvil to the pulmonary hilus for ICS 4 through 6. Simulated lobectomy of the left caudal lung lobe performed at ICS 5 and 6 resulted in a significantly shorter distance, compared with lobectomy performed at ICS 4 and 7. Simulated lobectomy of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes performed at ICS 4 and 5 resulted in a significantly shorter distance, compared with lobectomy performed at ICS 7. Simulated lobectomy of the accessory and right caudal lung lobes at ICS 5 and 6 resulted in a significantly shorter distance than for lobectomy performed at ICS 8.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

An optimal ICS for a minithoracotomy incision was determined for thoracoscopic-assisted lung lobectomy in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 9-year-old dog was evaluated for traumatic cervical myelopathy after a surgical attempt to realign and stabilize the C2 and C3 vertebrae.

Clinical Findings—The dog could not ventilate spontaneously and was tetraplegic; positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) was maintained. Myelography and computed tomography revealed spinal cord compression with subluxation of the C2 and C3 vertebrae and extrusion of the C2-3 intervertebral disk.

Treatment and Outcome—Surgically, the protruding disk material was removed and the vertebrae were realigned with screws and wire. For PPV, assist control ventilation in volume control mode and then in pressure control mode was used in the first 6 days; this was followed by synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation until 33 days after the injury; then only continuous positive airway pressure was provided until the dog could breathe unassisted, 37 days after the injury. Physical therapy that included passive range of motion exercises, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and functional weight-bearing positions was administered until the dog was discharged 46 days after injury; the dog was severely ataxic and tetraparetic but could walk. Therapy was continued at home, and 1 year later, the dog could run and had moderate ataxia and tetraparesis.

Clinical Relevance—Hypoventilation with tetraparesis in traumatic spinal cord injury can be successfully treated with PPV exceeding 30 days, surgery, and physical therapy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of pneumoperitoneum created with warmed humidified CO2 (WHCO2) during laparoscopy on core body temperature, cardiorespiratory and thromboelastography variables, systemic inflammation, peritoneal response, and signs of postoperative pain in healthy mature dogs.

ANIMALS 6 mature purpose-bred dogs.

PROCEDURES In a randomized crossover study, each dog was anesthetized twice, and pneumoperitoneum was created with standard-temperature CO2 (STCO2; 22°C and 0% relative humidity) and WHCO2 (37°C and 98% relative humidity). Data were collected during each procedure, including core body temperature, cardiorespiratory and thromboelastography variables, and inflammatory biomarkers. Peritoneal biopsy specimens were collected and evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Dogs were assessed for signs of postoperative pain.

RESULTS Mean core body temperature was significantly lower (35.2°C; 95% confidence interval, 34.5° to 35.8°C) with WHCO2 than with STCO2 (35.9°C; 95% confidence interval, 35.3° to 36.6°C) across all time points. Cardiac index increased during the procedure for both treatments but was not significantly different between treatments. Thromboelastography variables did not differ significantly between treatments as indicated by the coagulation index. Subjective evaluation of peritoneal biopsy specimens revealed mesothelial cell loss with STCO2. There was no significant difference in circulating C-reactive protein or interleukin-6 concentrations. There was a significant increase in the number of postoperative pain scores > 0 for the WHCO2 treatment versus the STCO2 treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Analysis of these data suggested that effects on evaluated variables attributable to the use of WHCO2 for creating pneumoperitoneum in healthy mature dogs undergoing laparoscopy did not differ from effects for the use of STCO2.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the perioperative characteristics and outcomes of dogs undergoing laparoscopic-assisted splenectomy (LAS).

ANIMALS

136 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Multicentric retrospective study. Medical records of dogs undergoing LAS for treatment of naturally occurring splenic disease from January 1, 2014, to July 31, 2020, were reviewed. History, signalment, physical examination and preoperative diagnostic test results, procedural information, complications, duration of hospitalization, histopathologic diagnosis, and perioperative outcomes were recorded. Perioperative complications were defined using the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group – Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (VCOG-CTCAE v2) guidelines.

RESULTS

LAS was performed for treatment of a splenic mass (124/136 [91%]), immune-mediated disease (7/136 [5%]), splenomegaly (4/136 [3%]), or immune-mediated disease in conjunction with a splenic mass (1/136 [1%]). Median splenic mass size was 1.3 cm3/kg body weight. Conversion to open laparotomy occurred in 5.9% (8/136) of dogs. Complications occurred in 78 dogs, with all being grade 2 or lower. Median surgical time was 47 minutes, and median postoperative hospital stay was 28 hours. All but 1 dog survived to discharge, the exception being postoperative death due to a suspected portal vein thrombus.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In the dogs of this report, LAS was associated with low rates of major complications, morbidity, and mortality when performed for a variety of splenic pathologies. Minimally invasive surgeons can consider the LAS technique to perform total splenectomy in dogs without hemoabdomen and with spleens with modest-sized splenic masses up to 55.2 cm3/kg, with minimal rates of complications, morbidity, and mortality.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association