Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jack G. Gallagher x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 12 dogs with lesions of the brain (3 cats, 2 dogs) or vertebral canal (10 dogs) that underwent intraoperative ultrasonography were reviewed. Ultrasonography was performed after craniotomy, a ventral slot procedure, or laminectomy, using a real-time sector scanner with a 7.5- or 10-MHz transducer. In the 3 cats and 2 dogs with brain lesions, cerebral masses were hyperechoic, compared with normal brain, and were easily located. In the 2 dogs, ultrasonography was necessary to localize deep-seated cerebral lesions that could not be seen following craniotomy. In 7 dogs that underwent a ventral slot procedure because of prolapse of an intervertebral disk, ultrasonography was successfully used to assess completeness of disk removal. The remaining 3 dogs underwent dorsal laminectomy because intradural enlargement of the spinal cord (1 dog) or an intradural mass (2 dogs) could be seen myelographically. In the 2 dogs with intradural masses, intraoperative ultrasonography helped to delineate the extent of the tumor. In the third dog, spinal cord swelling was seen ultrasonographically; the histologic diagnosis was spinal cord edema.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Long-term follow-up information was obtained for 17 cats with cerebral meningiomas treated by surgical excision. Three cats died or were euthanatized in the immediate postoperative period: 2 cats, because of brain herniation and 1 cat, because of acute renal failure. In the remaining 14 cats, most clinical signs resolved within 1 week of surgery. Three cats (21.4%) had confirmed or presumed local tumor recurrence. Two of these cats developed recurrent neurologic signs, and died or were euthanatized at 3 and 9 months, respectively, after surgery. One cat was euthanatized for an unrelated problem 72 months after surgery, and on postmortem examination, had a recurrent meningioma at the surgery site. The remaining 11 cats (78.6%) did not develop evidence of local tumor recurrence within follow-up periods ranging from 18 to 47 months (median, 27 months).

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association