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SUMMARY

A sublethal dose of ethylene glycol was administered orally to 3 groups of dogs; dogs of a control group were given distilled water instead. Renal cortical biopsy samples were obtained from dogs of experimental and control groups at various times after treatment. Tissue was examined by use of light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In dogs of the control group, the light and electron microscopic appearances of tissue were within normal limits at all sample collection hours. In dogs of the experimental groups, renal corpuscular structure remained within normal limits by use of light and electron microscopy throughout the study, though morphologic change was seen in other structures of the cortex. Light microscopic lesions first appeared at 12 hours, and were similar to those reported in the literature. Ultrastructural lesions were first observed in the 5-hour samples, and similar to the light microscopic lesions, were most common in the proximal convoluted tubules (pct). Initial pct cellular changes included vacuolization of cells and distention of the parabasal extracellular spaces; pct cellular lesions seen in later-hour samples included formation of apical buds and cellular rupture. Internalization or sloughing of the pct brush border was not observed. Distal convoluted tubules (dct) were frequently dilated and/or packed with cellular debris. A few dct cells had degenerative or necrotic changes. In pct and dct, abnormal cells were frequently flanked by normal or nearly normal cells. During later hours, a few cells with types of changes first observed in early hours continued to be observed, implying ongoing response of cells to the toxin.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary:

The effects of propofol on anesthetic induction were evaluated in 40 dogs anesthetized with isoflurane. Propofol is a rapidly acting, nonbarbiturate drug that induces anesthesia of ultrashort duration with iv administration. Four preanesthetic regimens were used: anesthesia without preanesthetic drugs; or with preanesthetic administration of acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg of body weight, im), diazepam (0.2 mg/kg, iv), or acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg) im. Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure (sap), respiration, quality of induction and recovery, and adverse effects were recorded. Intravenous propofol administration induced a variable period of apnea in 34 of 40 dogs. Cyanosis (in 2 dogs) and signs of pain on injection (in 3 dogs) were infrequently observed during induction. One dog developed ventricular premature depolarizations after propofol administration. Venous CO2 tension increased and pH decreased immediately after propofol administration, regardless of preanesthetic regimen. The sap significantly (P < 0.05) decreased after propofol administration in dogs treated with acepromazine (sap, 178 mm of Hg before vs 128 mm of Hg after propofol) and with acepromazine/butorphanol (sap, 184 mm of Hg before vs 98 mm of Hg after propofol). When used for induction, propofol induces anesthetic-related adverse effects, some of which can be minimized by preanesthetic medication. Recovery characteristics varied with preanesthetic medication, independent of propofol administration.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To examine, in horses, the disposition and excretion of the active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA) of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory prodrug nabumetone.

Design

Pharmacokinetic analysis of 6MNA after oral administration of nabumetone and IV administration of 6MNA.

Procedure

Using a crossover design, 5 horses were orally administered 3.7 mg of nabumetone/kg of body weight. After a 3-week washout period, 4 horses were administered 2.5 mg of 6MNA/kg, IV.

Results

Absorption of nabumetone from the gastrointestinal tract and its metabolism to 6MNA had a median appearance half-life of 0.88 hour. The elimination half-life was 11 hours. Area under the plasma concentration time curve for 6MNA after oral administration of nabumetone was 120.6 mg/h/L. A dose of 2.5 mg/kg of 6MNA administered IV resulted in plasma concentration nearly equivalent to that induced by the orally administered dose. Disposition of 6MNA was modeled as a one-compartment, first-order elimination. The area under the plasma concentration time curve for IV administration of 6MNA was 117.0 mg/h/L, and the specific volume of distribution was 0.247 L/kg. The distribution half-life and the elimination half-life were 0.56 and 7.90 hours, respectively. Percentage of total dose recovered in urine for the 36-hour collection period after the oral and IV administrations was 7.4 and 5.3%, respectively.

Conclusions

Metabolism of nabumetone to 6MNA, as reported in other species, also occurs in horses. There were a number of additional metabolites of nabumetone in urine that could not be fully identified and characterized. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:517–521)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Nine adult female sheep were each surgically fitted with an Ivan and Johnston reentrant cannula in the cranial part of the duodenum just distal to the pylorus. By diversion (loss) of abomasal outflow, this model has been shown to consistently induce hypochloremic, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, accompanied by hyponatremia and dehydration. Each sheep was subjected to 3 treatment trials, each preceded by a 24-hour prediversion period, and a diversion period during which a syndrome of hypochloremia (68 ± 2 mEq/L), hypokalemia, hyponatremia, and metabolic alkalosis was induced.

Development of this syndrome was attributable to losses of large amounts of acid and electrolytes in the abomasal effluent. Mean total electrolyte contents of the effluent were: Cl, 650 ± 27 mEq; Na+, 388 ± 23 mEq; and K+, 123 ± 12 mEq, with total volume loss ranging from 3.6 to 10.0 L of gastric contents and pH ranging from 3 to 5. Decreases in plasma electrolyte concentrations also can be attributed to decreased intake, because anorexia developed shortly after the onset of diversion. Electrolyte losses in urine during diversion were minimal for Cl (mean ± sem, 12.0 ± 5.1 mEq), but were greater for Na+ (124.2 ± 14.5 mEq) and K+ (185.1 ± 31.2 mEq).

Treatments consisted of 0.9% NaCl (300 mosm/L), 3.6% NaCl (1,200 mosm/L), and 7.2% NaCl (2,400 mosm/L) administered over a 2-hour period, with the administered volume determined by the estimated total extracellular fluid Cl deficit. Significant difference was not found among treatments, with all solutions resulting in return of clinicopathologic and physical variables to prediversion values within 12 hours of treatment. We concluded that rapid iv replacement of Cl, with small volumes of hypertonic saline solution, is safe and effective for correction of experimentally induced hypochloremic, hypokalemic, metabolic alkalosis in sheep.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Biological and biochemical characteristics of the leukotoxin of Fusobacterium necrophorum were determined. Culture supernatant of F necrophorum was toxic to polymorphonuclear neutrophilic, leukocytes from cattle and sheep, but not to those from pigs and rabbits. Culture supernatant and sonicated bacterial cell fractions had low hemolytic activity and did not cause dermonecrosis in a guinea pig. Supernatant derived leukotoxin was inactivated at 56 C for 5 minutes and became unstable at pH > 7.8 or < 6.6. Chemical treatment with 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 0.25% sodium deoxycholate, 5.2% sodium sulfide, or 0.25 mM titanium (III) citrate markedly decreased leukotoxicity. Enzymatic treatment with protease, trypsin, and chymotrypsin inactivated the toxin completely, whereas amylase had no effect. Use of protease inhibitors failed to prevent loss of leukotoxin activity. Using membrane partition chromatography and gel filtration, the estimated molecular weight of the toxin was > 300,000. On reduction and denaturation, the toxin dissociated into several components by use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Objective

To determine effect of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on rate and degree of return to function of the limb and development of degenerative joint disease (DJD) after surgical creation and subsequent stabilization of the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifle.

Animals

12 clinically normal adult large (19.5 to 31.5 kg) dogs.

Procedure

Dogs were anesthetized, and the right CrCL was severed via arthrotomy, destabilizing the stifle. After 3 weeks, the stifle was surgically stabilized. Three weeks later, 6 dogs were subjected to an EMS treatment protocol for the thigh muscles. At 5, 9, 13, and 19 weeks after stifle destabilization, treated (n = 6) and control (n = 6) dogs were evaluated for return of stifle function. Gross and histologic evaluations of the stifles were performed at 19 weeks after stifle destabilization.

Results

Treated dogs had significantly (P = 0.001) better lameness score than did control dogs. There was less palpable crepitation of the stifle in treated dogs (P = 0.06); treated dogs also had significantly (P = 0.01) fewer radiographic signs of bone changes. Thigh circumference was significantly (P = 0.02) larger in treated dogs.There was less gross cartilage damage (P = 0.07) in the EMS-treated dogs, but more medial meniscal damage (P = 0.058, cranial pole; P = 0.051, caudal pole).

Conclusions

Improved lameness scores, larger thigh circumference, and decreased radiographically apparent bony changes observed for the treated group of dogs support the hypothesis that dogs treated by EMS after surgical stabilization of the CrCL-deficient stifle had improved limb function, with less DJD, than did dogs treated with the currently accepted clinical protocol of cage rest and slow return to normal activity. However, results of force plate evaluation did not support the hypothesis. Increased meniscal damage in dogs treated by EMS may be cause for concern. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1473–1478)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether age, breed, sex, weight, or distraction index (DI) was associated with the risk that dogs of 4 common breeds (German Shepherd Dog, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Rottweiler) would have radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated with hip dysplasia.

Design—Cross-sectional prevalence study.

Animals—15,742 dogs.

Procedure—Hips of dogs were evaluated radiographically by use of the ventrodorsal hip-extended view, the compression view, and the distraction view. The ventrodorsal hip-extended view was examined to determine whether dogs had DJD. For each breed, a multiple logistic regression model incorporating age, sex, weight, and DI was created. For each breed, disease-susceptibility curves were produced, using all dogs, regardless of age, and dogs grouped on the basis of age.

Results—Weight and DI were significant risk factors for DJD in all breeds. For German Shepherd Dogs, the risk of having DJD was 4.95 times the risk for dogs of the other 3 breeds combined. In all breeds, the probability of having DJD increased with age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the probability of having hip DJD increased with hip joint laxity as measured by use of DI. This association was breed-specific, indicating that breedspecific information on disease susceptibility should be incorporated when making breeding decisions and when deciding on possible surgical treatment of hip dysplasia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1719–1724)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

An elisa was developed and tested to detect antibodies to Eperythrozoon suis in swine. Results were compared with those of the indirect hemagglutination (iha) test. Antigen isolated from swine heavily infected with E suis was used for both tests. Comparison of the elisa with the iha test revealed a significant (P < 0.001) correlation between results. Of 114 samples obtained from 9 swine infected with E suis, 87.7% were seropositive (titer ≥ 200) via the elisa, and 80.7% were seropositive (titer ≥ 20) via the iha test. The sensitivity of the elisa was greater than that of the iha test. All blood samples obtained from specific-pathogen-free swine tested negative for E suis antibody. Cross-reactions were not observed between E suis antigen and antisera against various swine and cattle disease agents using elisa. We concluded that the elisa may be used for rapid and effective diagnosis of infection with E suis in swine.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To determine whether feed restriction induces hepatic lipidosis (HL) in llamas and to evaluate the metabolic changes that develop during feed restriction.

Animals—8 healthy adult female llamas.

Procedure—Llamas were fed grass hay at a rate of 0.25% of their body weight per day for 13 to 28 days. Llamas were monitored by use of clinical observation, serum biochemical analyses, and ultrasound-guided liver biopsies.

Results—All 8 llamas lost weight and mobilized fat. Five llamas developed HL, including 4 that were nursing crias. During the period of feed restriction, mean serum concentration of bile acids and activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) were significantly higher in llamas that developed HL, compared with llamas that did not. Mean insulin-to-cortisol concentration ratios were lower in llamas with HL before and up to 7 days of feed restriction, compared with those that did not develop HL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—HL in llamas may be induced by severe feed restriction, particularly in the face of increased energy demand. Llamas with weight loss attributable to inadequate dietary intake may develop biochemical evidence of hepatopathy and HL. Increases in serum concentration of bile acids and activities of GGT, AST, and SDH may indicate the development of HL in llamas and identify affected animals for aggressive therapeutic intervention. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1081–1087)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the outcome of locally administered antibiotic-impregnated poloxamer 407 (P407) hydrogel in dogs diagnosed with orthopedic surgical site infections (SSIs) and to identify risk factors for treatment failure.

ANIMALS

34 client-owned dogs diagnosed with an orthopedic surgical site infection treated with local antibiotic-impregnated P407 hydrogel.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed of dogs receiving antibiotic-impregnated P407 hydrogel for an active orthopedic SSI between March 2018 and December 2020. The rate of successful infection clearance was calculated. Risk factors for failed treatment were evaluated with statistical analyses.

RESULTS

34 dogs met the inclusion criteria. Vancomycin-impregnated P407 hydrogel (20 mg/mL) was implanted in all dogs. The rate of infection clearance was 77%. Each unit increase in the number of surgeries performed at a site before gel implantation decrease the chance of successful infection clearance by 25% (P = .005; unit OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.81). Presence of multidrug or methicillin resistance increased risk for treatment failure by 7.69 times (P = .042; OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.01 to 1.14). No adverse events related to gel administration were seen.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Treatment outcomes were negatively impacted by the presence of multidrug or methicillin resistance and by an increased number of surgeries before gel implantation. Local administration of antibiotic-impregnated P407 hydrogel had a high success rate with no adverse effects in this population. Local antibiotic gel administration may improve treatment outcomes in dogs with complicated SSI.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association