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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the economic and clinical feasibility of introducing rigid endoscopy and laparoscopy to a small animal general practice.

DESIGN Prospective study.

SAMPLE A single 2-veterinarian small animal practice in southern California.

PROCEDURES In early 2012, endoscopic equipment was purchased, and both veterinarians in the practice undertook training in rigid endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures. Subsequently, information for client-owned animals that underwent endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures during a 12-month period (2012 to 2013) was collected. Cost of equipment and training, revenue generated, specific procedures performed, surgery time, complications, and client satisfaction were evaluated.

RESULTS 78 endoscopic procedures were performed in 73 patients, including 71 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 rabbit. Cost of endoscopic and laparoscopic equipment and training in the first year was $14,809.71; most equipment was financed through a 5-year lease at a total cost of $57,507.70 ($ 10,675.20/y). Total revenue generated in the first year was $50,423.63. The most common procedures performed were ovariectomy (OVE; n = 49), prophylactic gastropexy (6), and video otoscopy (12). Mean ± SD surgery times for OVE (n = 44) and for OVE with gastropexy (5) were 63.7 ± 19.7 minutes and 73.0 ± 33.5 minutes; respectively. Twelve of 54 patients undergoing laparoscopic procedures experienced minor intraoperative complications. Conversion to laparotomy was not required in any patient. There were no major complications. All 49 clients available for follow-up were satisfied.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE With appropriate training and equipment, incorporation of basic rigid endoscopy and laparoscopy may be feasible in small animal general practice. However, results of the present study are not applicable to all veterinarians and practice settings, and patient safety considerations should always be paramount.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of incidental adrenal gland masses identified in dogs undergoing abdominal CT.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 270 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs that underwent abdominal CT from June 2013 through June 2014 were reviewed. Patients were excluded if they had undergone CT because of a history or clinical signs of an adrenal gland mass or disease. Information collected included history, signalment, initial complaint, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, urine specific gravity, and whether abdominal ultrasonography was performed. Imaging reports generated by the board-certified radiologist who evaluated the CT images were reviewed.

RESULTS Incidental adrenal gland masses were detected in 25 of the 270 (9.3%) dogs. Dogs with incidental adrenal gland masses were significantly older (median, 12.0 years; range, 8.0 to 15.0 years) than dogs without (8.2 years; range, 0.1 to 13.1 years). Dogs examined for neoplasia were significantly more likely to have an incidental adrenal gland mass (22/138 [15.9%]) than were dogs examined for any other reason (3/132 [2.3%]), but these dogs were also significantly older. No other risk factors were identified. Histologic examination was performed in only 3 of the 25 dogs with incidental adrenal gland masses; 2 had cortical adenomas and 1 had a pheochromocytoma and cortical adenoma.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that a clinically important percentage of dogs undergoing abdominal CT will have incidental adrenal gland masses, with incidental masses more likely in older than in younger dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the technique, clinical findings, and short-term outcome in dogs undergoing laparoscopic-assisted incisional gastropexy with a reusable single-incision surgery port.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs referred for elective laparoscopic gastropexy between June 2012 and August 2013 were reviewed. History, signalment, results of physical examination and preoperative laboratory testing, surgical procedure, duration of surgery, postoperative complications, duration of hospital stay, and short-term outcome were recorded. All patients underwent general anesthesia and were positioned in dorsal recumbency. After an initial limited laparoscopic exploration, single-incision laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy was performed extracorporeally in all dogs via a conical port placed in a right paramedian location. Concurrent procedures included laparoscopic ovariectomy (n = 4), gastric biopsy (2), and castration (7). Short-term outcome was evaluated.

RESULTS Median duration of surgery was 76 minutes (range, 40 to 90 minutes). Intraoperative complications were minor and consisted of loss of pneumoperitoneum in 2 of 14 dogs. A postoperative surgical site infection occurred in 1 dog and resolved with standard treatment. Median duration of follow-up was 371 days (range, 2 weeks to 1.5 years). No dogs developed gastric dilation–volvulus during the follow-up period, and all owners were satisfied with the outcome.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that single-incision laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy with a reusable conical port was feasible and effective in appropriately selected cases. Investigation of the potential benefits of this reusable port versus single-use devices for elective gastropexy in dogs is warranted.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 10-year-old spayed female Corgi mix was examined for a 3-week history of lethargy and weight gain.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination findings included muffled heart sounds and a distended abdomen with a fluid wave on ballottement. Thoracic radiography revealed a globoid cardiac silhouette, and thoracic ultrasonography indicated pericardial effusion and a pedunculated mass originating from the right auricle.

Treatment and Outcome—Initial treatment consisted of pericardiocentesis. One week later, thoracoscopic right atrial mass resection was performed. No surgical complications were noted, and the dog was discharged approximately 28 hours after surgery. Results of histologic examination of the mass indicated a grade 2 hemangiosarcoma with incomplete margins. Treatment with doxorubicin was initiated 35 days after surgery. The dog survived for 177 days after mass resection, when it was euthanized because of complications related to metastatic disease.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that thoracoscopic right atrial mass removal combined with adjunct doxorubicin treatment may be a viable alternative to thoracotomy in dogs with right atrial masses.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare required time and costs of surgery and hospitalization as well as prevalence of incomplete urinary cystolith removal associated with laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy versus open cystotomy in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—20 dogs with urolithiasis treated by laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy and 23 dogs treated by open cystotomy.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Surgery cost, hospitalization cost, total cost, surgery time, days in hospital, incomplete cystolith removal, and number of doses of analgesic administered IV after surgery were compared between the laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy and open cystotomy groups.

Results—Surgery cost and total cost were significantly higher in the laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy group. Hospitalization cost, days in hospital, and prevalence of incomplete cystolith removal did not differ significantly between groups. Number of doses of analgesic was significantly lower in the laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy was more time-consuming and expensive but associated with fewer postoperative doses of injectable analgesics, compared with open cystotomy. Laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy is an acceptable, more expensive, and minimally invasive alternative to open cystotomy for the removal of urinary cystoliths in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether number of instrument cannulas is associated with surgical time or severity of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing laparoscopic ovariectomy.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—18 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to undergo laparoscopic ovariectomy with 1, 2, or 3 instrument cannulas. Surgical time and intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded. Severity of pain was monitored 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after surgery by means of pain scoring with a modified Melbourne Pain Scale and palpation of surgical sites with variably sized von Frey filaments. Owner-assessed postoperative comfort was also evaluated.

Results—Surgical time was significantly longer with 1 cannula (mean ± SD, 29.7 ± 5.6 minutes) than with 2 cannulas (18.2 ± 4.4 minutes) or 3 cannulas (19.3 ± 3.4 minutes). Intraoperative complications included splenic puncture (2 dogs), pedicle hemorrhage (1 dog), and SC emphysema (1 dog); complication rates were not significantly different among groups. Total pain score was significantly lower for dogs with 2 cannulas than for dogs with 3 cannulas; total pain score for dogs with 1 cannula did not differ significantly from scores for dogs with 2 cannulas or 3 cannulas. Owner assessments of postoperative comfort and number of days pain medications were administered did not differ among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that laparoscopic ovariectomy with 2 instrument cannulas, rather than with 1, resulted in shorter surgical times without increasing severity of postoperative pain.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 5 dogs between 9 and 11 years of age were evaluated for treatment of primary (n = 2) or metastatic (3) hepatic neoplasia.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Patients were evaluated on an elective (n = 3) or emergency (2) basis. Two dogs with primary hepatic neoplasia were evaluated because of lethargy and inappetence. One dog was referred after an enlarged anal sac was detected via palpation per rectum during a routine physical examination. Two dogs were evaluated on an emergency basis because of lethargy and weakness, and hemoabdomen in the absence of a history of trauma was detected. All 5 dogs underwent thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography, with CT performed in both dogs with primary hepatic neoplasia. All dogs had preoperative evidence of abdominal neoplasia, and none had evidence of thoracic metastasis.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME All dogs underwent ventral midline laparotomy and had diffuse hepatic neoplasia that precluded complete resection. Locoregional treatment with MWA was applied to hepatic lesions (0.5 to 2.5 cm diameter) without procedural complications. Histopathologic diagnoses were biliary adenocarcinoma (n = 1), hemangiosarcoma (2), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and apocrine gland adenocarcinoma (1).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE MWA is being increasingly used as an adjunct in the surgical treatment of human patients with primary and metastatic liver disease. Results of the present small case series suggested that MWA is feasible and potentially effective as an adjunctive treatment for appropriately selected dogs with nonresectable hepatic tumors. Further investigation is indicated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the disease-free interval (DFI) and median survival time (MST) in dogs with idiopathic and neoplastic pericardial effusion surgically treated by a thoracoscopic pericardial window procedure or subtotal pericardectomy via thoracotomy and to compare DFI and MST in dogs with and without a mass on preoperative echocardiography that underwent either surgical technique.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—58 dogs with pericardial effusion.

Procedures—Medical records between 1985 and 2010 were evaluated. Dogs were included in the study if they had confirmed pericardial effusion and underwent a thoracoscopic pericardial window procedure or subtotal pericardectomy via thoracotomy.

Results—Clinical signs of dogs at initial evaluation were similar, with the exception of lethargy, between dogs treated by subtotal pericardectomy via thoracotomy or the pericardial window procedure. Dogs with idiopathic pericardial effusion that underwent the thoracoscopic pericardial window procedure had significantly shorter DFI and MST than did those treated by subtotal pericardectomy via thoracotomy. For neoplastic pericardial effusion, DFI and MST were not significantly different between dogs treated with either surgical technique.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with idiopathic pericardial effusion treated with a subtotal pericardectomy via thoracotomy had a significantly longer DFI and MST, compared with dogs treated by the thoracoscopic pericardial window procedure. This difference in outcome may be related to inaccuracy of the initial diagnosis or ineffectiveness of the pericardial window to palliate the signs of idiopathic pericardial effusion long term.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 17-month-old neutered female Labrador Retriever with a 3- to 4-month history of abdominal distention was referred for evaluation and treatment.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Evaluation of a peritoneal fluid specimen collected by the referring veterinarian indicated a pure transudate. At admission, transabdominal ultrasonography revealed microhepatica, dilation of the intrahepatic and mesenteric vasculature, peritoneal effusion, and multiple aberrant blood vessels. A large, high-flow hepatic arteriovenous malformation (HAVM) with secondary portal hypertension, peritoneal effusion, multiple acquired portosystemic shunts, and microhepatica was evident on CT angiography.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Transfemoral hepatic arteriography and staged coil and glue (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) embolization of the complex arteriovenous malformation nidus and central main left hepatic artery resulted in ablation of the lesion, restoration of arterial blood flow to the contralateral hepatic lobes, and resolution of the peritoneal effusion. The dog remained without clinical signs of hepatic disease until it was euthanized 5 months after treatment for an unrelated condition.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Successful endovascular management of a HAVM was accomplished by means of coil and glue embolization in the patient of this report. Dogs with comparable HAVMs may benefit from similar minimally invasive treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare initial leak pressure (ILP) between cadaveric canine and synthetic small intestinal segments that did and did not undergo enterotomy.

SAMPLE

Eight 8-cm grossly normal jejunal segments from 1 canine cadaver and eight 8-cm synthetic small intestinal segments.

PROCEDURES

Intestinal segments were randomly assigned to undergo enterotomy (6 cadaveric and 6 synthetic segments) or serve as untreated controls (2 cadaveric and 2 synthetic segments). For segments designated for enterotomy, a 2-cm full-thickness incision was created along the antimesenteric border. The incision was closed in a single layer with 4-0 suture in a simple continuous pattern. Leak testing was performed with intestinal segments occluded at both ends and infused with dilute dye solution (999 mL/h) until the solution was observed leaking from the suture line or serosal tearing occurred. Intraluminal pressure was continuously monitored. The ILP at construct failure was compared between cadaveric and synthetic control segments and between cadaveric and synthetic enterotomy segments.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD ILP did not differ significantly between cadaveric (345.11 ± 2.15 mm Hg) and synthetic (329.04 ± 24.69 mm Hg) control segments but was significantly greater for cadaveric enterotomy segments (60.77 ± 15.81 mm Hg), compared with synthetic enterotomy segments (15.03 ± 6.41 mm Hg).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leak testing should not be used to assess the accuracy or security of enterotomy suture lines in synthetic intestinal tissue. Synthetic intestinal tissue is best used for students to gain confidence and proficiency in performing enterotomies before performing the procedure on live animals.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research