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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 3-year-old and a 7-year-old spayed female rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were evaluated because of digestive stasis associated with renal asymmetry.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Neoplasia of the right kidney was diagnosed via cytologic analysis in the 3-year-old rabbit. Ureterolithiasis of the left kidney was diagnosed via abdominal ultrasonography in the 7-year-old rabbit. To evaluate whether unilateral nephrectomy was indicated, evaluation of glomerular filtration rate by dynamic CT (CT-GFR) was performed on both rabbits. On the basis of the functional and morphological CT-GFR results, radical nephrectomy was recommended for the rabbit with renal neoplasia whereas a more conservative approach was recommended for the other rabbit.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The rabbit with renal neoplasia underwent radical nephrectomy without complication. The rabbit with ureterolithiasis underwent ureteral stent placement, and the renal pelvic dilatation resolved. Both rabbits maintained unremarkable serum urea and creatinine concentrations after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE GFR is a highly useful and reliable variable for the evaluation of renal function but is difficult to assess with routine clinical laboratory tests. The CT-GFR technique described here was quickly performed, was technically suitable for rabbits, and provided clinically relevant information. Studies are required to establish reference values for CT-GFR in rabbits.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-year-old spayed female domestic ferret was evaluated because of lethargy, alopecia, pruritus, and an abdominal mass.

Clinical Findings—On initial examination, nonregenerative anemia, mild azotemia, and a large left adrenal gland mass were identified. However, deterioration of the ferret's general condition prevented excision of the mass, and dyspnea, weakness, hypertension, and severe hypokalemia developed. Plasma aldosterone concentration was > 3,329 pmol/L, confirming a provisional diagnosis of hyperaldosteronism. High concentrations of sex hormones were also observed, but baseline cortisol concentration was within reference limits.

Treatment and Outcome—Medical treatment included oral administration of spironolactone, potassium gluconate, leuprolide acetate, amlodipine, and benazepril. Inhalation of albuterol proved effective in reducing the dyspnea. In the following weeks, serum potassium concentration returned to within reference limits and hypertension decreased, but dyspnea persisted. Two months after initial examination, the ferret became anorectic and was euthanized. Histologic examination revealed a large left adrenal gland adenoma, progressive chronic nephropathy, severe pulmonary edema, and focal fibrosis in the left ventricle. Immunohistochemical staining of the adrenal gland mass revealed aldosterone within neoplastic adrenocortical cells.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that primary hyperaldosteronism should be considered as a possible cause in ferrets with hypokalemia, hypertension, and an adrenal gland mass. Early detection of aldosterone-secreting masses might allow for removal of the tumor before irreversible complications occur.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 10-week-old 0.73-kg (1.6-lb) castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was referred for exploratory laparotomy because of pneumoperitoneum and possible septic peritonitis after being bitten by the owner's dog.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Abdominal exploration revealed a large laceration of the duodenum, tears of the jejunal mesentery, and 2 small tears in the abdominal wall. Chylous abdominal effusion developed 48 hours after surgery.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Postoperative care included supportive treatment, analgesia, and antimicrobials. An abdominal drain was placed during the laparotomy and enabled monitoring of abdominal fluid production. Enteral feeding was provided through an esophagostomy tube. The chylous fluid production rapidly decreased after treatment with octreotide was initiated, and the ferret improved. Chyloabdomen resolved after 8 days of hospitalization and medical treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that chylous ascites can potentially develop secondary to blunt abdominal trauma in ferrets. In this ferret, chyloabdomen was successfully treated with octreotide administration and abdominal drainage.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association