Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ilaria Spalla x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To retrospectively compare efficacy of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) helmet against standard oxygen supplementation (STD) administered by nasal cannulae in dogs with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE).

ANIMALS

83 dogs (STD group, n = 41; CPAP group, 42) hospitalized for ACPE (January 2019 to April 2021).

METHODS

Mean respiratory rate, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, and rectal body temperature were compared between and within groups before and at 1 (T1), 2 (T2), 3 (T3), 6 (T6), and 12 (T12) hours from the beginning of STD/CPAP therapy. Duration of oxygen supplementation, hospitalization time, total diuretic dose, additional pharmacological interventions and mortality rates were compared between groups. The veterinary bedside lung ultrasound in emergency score, thoracic radiographs, and arterial blood parameters were compared between and within groups before and at the end of CPAP/STD therapy.

RESULTS

Within both groups, clinical parameters decreased during the observation period. Mean respiratory rate and heart rate were significantly lower in the CPAP group than the STD group at T1, T2, T3, T6, and T12. Mean systolic arterial pressure was significantly lower in the CPAP group than the STD group at T2, T3, T6, and T12. Mean oxygen supplementation duration, cumulative loop diuretic dose, and both veterinary bedside lung ultrasound in emergency score and arterial PaCO 2 at the end of CPAP/STD therapy were significantly lower in the CPAP group than the STD group. No significant differences were observed in hospitalization time and mortality rates.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The addition of helmet CPAP compared with standard oxygen administration showed a faster clinical improvement with lower cumulative loop diuretic and shorter oxygen supplementation in dogs hospitalized for ACPE.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association