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  • Author or Editor: Ikuo Goto x
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Summary

The cause of species difference in the susceptibility of erythrocytes to L-sorbose, and the difference in the hemolytic effect of sorbose on high potassium-containing (hk) and low potassium-containing (lk) canine erythrocytes were examined. L-Sorbose was phosphorylated in canine erythrocytes, but not in human erythrocytes. Furthermore, sorbose-1-phosphate, a metabolite of L-sorbose, strongly inhibited the hexokinase of lk canine erythrocytes, but not that of hk canine erythrocytes. These results strongly indicated that inhibition of hexokinase by sorbose-1-phosphate in lk erythrocytes induced severe glycolytic limitation in these cells, resulting in hemolysis, and that hk erythrocytes are resistant to sorbose-induced hemolysis because these cells have a high hexokinase activity.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

To clarify the oxidant defense functions of reduced glutathione (gsh) in erythrocytes, the effect of gsh deficiency on in vitro oxidant defense was studied, using gsh-deficient sheep erythrocytes (low-gsh cells). The formation of Heinz bodies in low-gsh cells was higher than that in high-gsh cells when the cells were incubated with an oxidant drug, acetylphenylhydrazine (aph). Artificial depletion of gsh by 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in high-gsh cells resulted in increased Heinz body formation in these cells incubated with aph. Furthermore, high negative correlation was observed between Heinz body formation and gsh content in sheep erythrocytes exposed to aph. These results clearly indicate that erythrocyte gsh is indispensable for erythrocyte defense against oxidative damage induced by aph, and support the previous observations that sheep with low-gsh erythrocytes were more susceptible to oxidative agents than were sheep with high-gsh erythrocytes.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Twenty-seven wild geese (Anser albifrons) suffering from lead poisoning caused by ingestion of lead shot were treated with disodium calcium ethylenediaminetetraacetate. The concentration of lead in blood ranged from 0.4 to 23.0 μg/ml, with a mean concentration of 5.6 μg/ml. In 22 of the birds, 1 to 48 lead pellets (mean, 10.5 pellets/bird) were seen on radiographs of their gizzards. Eleven of 27 birds recovered 3 to 8 weeks after the initiation of treatment. In the birds that recovered, the lead pellets were rapidly eroded as the birds recovered their appetites in response to treatment, and disappeared radiographically between treatment days 17 and 52. The birds that did not survive died within 4 weeks, despite decreased concentrations of lead in blood. Of these 16 birds, 15 had radiographic evidence of impaction of the proventriculus at the first examination and no evidence of resolution of the impaction at the time of death. In contrast, only 2 of the 11 geese that recovered had impaction of the proventriculus at the time of admission. Thus, the condition of the proventriculus seems to be the first consideration to evaluate in the prognosis of lead poisoning in geese.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association