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  • Author or Editor: Igor Yankin x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of 1-Desamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP; desmopressin acetate) on platelet aggregation in healthy dogs receiving aspirin or clopidogrel.

ANIMALS

7 healthy staff-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

In this randomized double-blinded crossover study, impedance aggregometry was performed on samples of lithium-heparinized whole blood samples from dogs before (T0) treatment with aspirin (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h for 4 days; ASP group) or clopidogrel (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h for 4 days; CLP group) and then before (T1) and after (T2) treatment with DDAVP (0.3 µg/kg, IV, once). There was a 14-day washout period before the crossover component. Aggregometry was performed with 4 different assays, each of which involved a different agonist reagent to stimulate platelet function: ADP, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6, arachidonic acid, or collagen type 1.

RESULTS

Median results for platelet aggregometry with agonist reagents ADP, arachidonic acid, or thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 significantly decreased between T0 and T1 for the CLP group; however, no meaningful difference in platelet aggregation was detected in the ASP group. Results for platelet aggregometry did not differ substantially between T1 and T2 regardless of treatment group or assay.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings suggested that administration of DDAVP may have no effect on platelet aggregation (measured with platelet aggregometry) in healthy dogs treated with clopidogrel. Because no inhibition of platelet aggregation was detected for dogs in the ASP group, no conclusion could be made regarding the effects of DDAVP administered to dogs treated with aspirin.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe coagulation profiles in dogs with echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), to compare them to coagulation profiles in dogs without echocardiographic evidence of PH, and to determine the relationship between coagulation profiles and echocardiographic probability of PH.

ANIMALS

66 dogs with PH (cases) and 86 dogs without PH (controls).

METHODS

Retrospective evaluation of records between 2013 and 2021 of dogs that had both an echocardiogram and a coagulation panel performed within 7 days. Dogs that received antithrombotics within 7 days of evaluation and dogs diagnosed with congenital or acquired coagulopathy or other severe systemic disease that could lead to coagulopathy were excluded. Dogs with a low echocardiographic probability of PH were also excluded. The dogs were divided into a PH group and non-PH group based on echocardiographic results. Demographic, clinicopathologic, and traditional coagulation parameters and VCM Vet (Entegrion) parameters were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

Dogs with PH were significantly older (median, 11 years vs 9.5 years, P = .02) and had a significantly lower body weight (median, 7.3 kg vs 19.3 kg, P < .001) than controls. Dogs with PH also had a significantly greater percent increase in prothrombin time (PT; P = .02), partial thromboplastin time (PTT; P < .0001), and fibrinogen (P = .045); however, their antithrombin concentration was lower (P = .005) compared to controls. Eight of 65 dogs (12.3%) in the PH group and 1/86 (1.2%) dogs in the non-PH group had an elevation of PT and/or PTT greater than 50% above the reference interval (P = .005). Dogs with PH had 11.9 times (95% CI, 1.5 to 97.9; P = .02) greater odds of being hypocoagulable than dogs without PH based on PT and PTT.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This study demonstrated an association between a moderate to high echocardiographic probability of PH and a hypocoagulable state in dogs as determined by traditional coagulation assays. It underscores the importance of monitoring the coagulation status in canine patients with PH, particularly before initiating antithrombotic medications.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research