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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether foals with pneumonia that were treated with erythromycin, alone or in combination with rifampin or gentamicin, had a higher risk of developing adverse effects, compared with foals treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMS), penicillin G procaine (PGP), or a combination of TMS and PGP (control foals).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—143 foals < 240 days old.

Procedure—Information on age, sex, breed, primary drug treatment, total days of treatment with the primary drug, and whether the foal developed diarrhea, hyperthermia, or respiratory distress was obtained from the medical records. Relative risk (RR) and attributable risk (AR) were calculated to compare risk of adverse reactions between foals treated with erythromycin and control foals.

Results—Only 3 (4.3%) control foals developed diarrhea; none developed hyperthermia or respiratory distress. Foals treated with erythromycin had an 8-fold risk (RR, 8.3) of developing diarrhea, compared with control foals, and increased risks of hyperthermia (AR, 25%) and respiratory distress (AR, 15%).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that use of erythromycin to treat foals with pneumonia was associated with an increased risk of diarrhea, hyperthermia, and respiratory distress, compared with use of TMS or PGP. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:68–73)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess individual and combined associations of high-speed exercise and horseshoe characteristics with risk of forelimb proximal sesamoid bone fractures and proximal sesamoid bone midbody fractures in Thoroughbred racehorses.

Animals—269 deceased Thoroughbred racehorses.

Procedures—A case-control study design was used to compare 121 horses with a fracture of at least 1 of 4 forelimb proximal sesamoid bones (75 horses had a midbody fracture) and 148 horses without a forelimb proximal sesamoid bone fracture. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate potential risk factors for association with proximal sesamoid bone fracture.

Results—Compared with horses that died without proximal sesamoid bone fractures, horses that died with proximal sesamoid bone fractures were more likely to be sexually intact males, spend more time in active trainingand racing, complete more events, train and race longer since their last layup, have higher exercise intensities during the 12 months prior to death, and have greater cumulative distances for their career. Horses with proximal sesamoid bone midbody fractures were more likely to be sexually intact males, train and race longer since their last layup, and have higher exercise intensities during the 12 months prior to death.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Limitingexercise intensity and the continuous time spent in activity duringa horse's career may decrease the frequency of forelimb proximal sesamoid bone fractures in Thoroughbred horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate flow cytometric analysis for sex identification in 3 psittacine species, establish reference values for blood cell DNA content for each species, and determine effects of sample storage on DNA content.

Animals—36 orange-winged Amazon parrots, 41 budgerigars, and 39 cockatiels.

Procedure—Blood samples were stained and analyzed by use of flow cytometry to measure cellular DNA content. Samples were analyzed immediately after collection and after being stored at 4 C for 48 and 72 hours.

Results—Mean DNA content (picograms per cell) was 3.248 for Amazon parrots, 2.702 for budgerigars, and 2.946 for cockatiels; DNA concentrations in samples analyzed immediately overlapped in a male and a female Amazon parrot and among 19 cockatiels. For budgerigars, DNA overlap between sexes was not detected in samples analyzed immediately or after storage for 72 hours. Sex was identified correctly in 94.4% of Amazon parrots, 100% of budgerigars, and 51.3% of cockatiels. For both sexes, DNA content in samples analyzed immediately was significantly different from that of stored samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Flow cytometric analysis was accurate for sex identification of Amazon parrots and budgerigars. Sample storage at 4 C for 48 or 72 hours caused variability in DNA content. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:847–850)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure the frequency and magnitude of reduced fibrinogen binding in a population of horses from a Thoroughbred breeding farm.

Animals—444 Thoroughbred horses, 1 to 27 years old, including 316 females, 72 geldings, and 56 sexually intact males.

Procedures—Blood was collected from horses into tubes containingacid citrate dextrose adenine, and washed platelets were examined by use of flow cytometry for their ability to bind fibrinogen.

Results—Data regarding fibrinogen binding to activated platelets were normally distributed, with nearly identical amounts of variation regardless of sex. In 3 horses, fibrinogen binding to platelets was reduced from 67.6% to 83.4%, compared with normal platelets, which indicated an inability of platelets to aggregate in response to thrombin (0.1 U/mL).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Platelet fibrinogen binding of the affected horses identified in this study was characteristic of a reported heritable bleeding disorder in which the reduction in fibrinogen binding correlated with prolonged bleeding times in template bleeding assays. The bleeding disorder is distinct from Glanzmann thrombasthenia, in which platelets fail to bind fibrinogen because of lack of αllb-β3 integrin on their surface. The prevalence of affected horses within the small sample population studied here (0.7% [n = 3]) is considerably higher than the prevalence of bleeding disorders within more genetically diverse groups.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a Markov-chain model for the development of forelimb injuries in Thoroughbreds and to use the model to determine effects of reducing sprint distance on incidence of metacarpal condylar fracture (CDY) and severe suspensory apparatus injury (SSAI).

Sample Population—Weekly exercise and injury data for 122 Thoroughbreds during racing or training.

Procedure—Weekly data were used to construct a Markov-chain model with 5 states (uninjured [UNINJ], palpable suspensory apparatus injury [PSAI], SSAI, CDY, and lost to follow-up [LOST]). Transition probabilities between UNINJ and PSAI were estimated as a function of weekly sprint distance by use of linear regression analysis. The model was used to predict distributions of annual CDY and SSAI incidences in southern California racehorses and was validated by using CDY incidence reported by racetrack practitioners. The model was modified by reducing the number of sprint distances that were > 6 furlongs (> 1.20 km) by 20%, and CDY and SSAI incidences were compared with those generated by the baseline model.

Results—The model accurately fit development of injuries in the sample population but overestimated development of injuries in the southern California racehorse population. Development of and recovery from PSAI were correlated with distance run at high speeds. Reducing by 20% the number of sprints run at distances > 6 furlongs significantly reduced modeled annual CDY and SSAI incidence by 9%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Reducing the number of sprints at distances > 6 furlongs, particularly among horses with PSAI, reduces risk of CDY and SSAI. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:328–337)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To create a stochastic model to quantify the risk that shipments of cattle from regions within the United States would contain animals seropositive for bluetongue virus and to determine shipment-level accuracy of serologic testing by use of a competitive ELISA (c-ELISA).

Sample Population—19,216 shipments containing 528,918 cattle and calves.

Procedure—Data were obtained on number of animals and state of origin of cattle in export shipments originating within the United States between January 1994 and March 2002. Probability distributions for size of export shipments were determined for all states within the United States, and distributions for agar gel immunodiffusion and c-ELISA accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) were determined from expert opinion and review of the literature. The model simulated selection of a shipment and then determined the probability that a threshold number or percentage of cattle within that shipment would have a positive c-ELISA result. Shipment-level sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value, and negative-predictive value were calculated.

Results—Substantial differences were evident in the regional probability of a shipment being declared positive, with shipments from northeastern states having the lowest probability and shipments from southwestern states having the highest probability. The c- ELISA had variable predictive values at the shipment level, depending on the threshold used and the prevalence of antibody-positive cattle within the region.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results from this study will aid importers in making scientifically based decisions regarding risk of importing antibodypositive cattle. ( Am J Vet Res 2003;64:520–529)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate herd characteristics and management practices associated with a high seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) in dairy herds in central California.

Sample Population—60 randomly selected cows from each of 21 dairy herds.

Procedures—Sera of selected cows were tested for antibodies against MAP by use of an ELISA test kit. Cows with a test sample-to-positive control sample (S:P) ratio of ≥ 0.25 were considered seropositive, and herds with ≥ 4% seropositive cows were considered high-seroprevalence herds. Data on herd characteristics and management practices were collected via interviews with owners. Bayesian logistic regression was used to model the predictive probability of a herd having a high seroprevalence on the basis of various herd characteristics and management practices.

Results—9 of 21 (43%) herds were classified as high-seroprevalence herds. Five variables (history of previous signs of paratuberculosis in the herd, herd size, exposing cattle to water from manure storage lagoons, feeding unsalable milk to calves, and exposing heifers ≤ 6 months old to manure of adult cows) were included in the predictive model on the basis of statistical and biological considerations. In large herds, the predictive probability of a high seroprevalence of MAP infection decreased from 0.74 to 0.39 when management changed from poor to good practices. In small herds, a similar decrease from 0.64 to 0.29 was predicted.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The seroprevalence of MAP infection in California dairies may be reduced by improvements in herd management practices.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To estimate cat population size, management, and outside fecal deposition and evaluate attitudes of cat owners and nonowners to stray animal control, water pollution, and wildlife protection.

Design—Cross-sectional survey.

Sample Population—294 adult residents of Cayucos, Los Osos, and Morro Bay, Calif.

Procedures—Telephone survey.

Results—The region's cat population was estimated at 7,284 owned and 2,046 feral cats, and 38% of surveyed households owned a mean of 1.9 cats/household. Forty-four percent of cats defecated outside >75% of the time. Annual fecal deposition (wet weight) by owned cats in the 3 communities was estimated to be 77.6 tonnes (76.4 tons). Cat owners were more likely to oppose cat licensing and impounding stray cats and support trap-neuter-return for stray cats and less likely to be concerned about water pollution, than were noncat owners.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Feral cats represented a sizeable proportion (22%) of the free roaming cats in this area and could be contributing 30.0 tonnes (29.5 tons) of feces to the environment per year. However, feral cats are not the principal source of fecal loading because owned cats defecating outdoors contribute an estimated 77.6 tonnes (76.4 tons) or 72% of the annual outdoor fecal deposition.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare macrostructural and microstructural features of proximal sesamoid bones (PSBs) from horses with and without PSB midbody fracture to gain insight into the pathogenesis of PSB fracture.

Sample Population—PSBs from 16 Thoroughbred racehorses (8 with and 8 without a PSB midbody fracture).

Procedures—Parasagittal sections of fractured and contralateral intact PSBs from horses with a PSB fracture and an intact PSB from age- and sex-matched control horses without a PSB fracture were evaluated for visual, radiographic, microradiographic, histologic, and his-tomorphometric differences in bone porosity, vascular channels, heme pigment, trabecular anisotropy, and pathological findings.

Results—Fractured PSBs and their contralateral intact PSBs had more compacted trabecular bone than did control PSBs. Focal repair or remodeling was evident in the palmar aspect of many fractured and contralateral intact PSBs. Fracture coincided with microstructural features and propagated from the flexor to the articular surface.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fractured PSBs had adapted to high loading but had focal evidence of excessive remodeling and porosity that likely predisposed the horses to complete fracture and catastrophic injury. Detection of focal injury before complete fracture provides an opportunity for prevention of catastrophic injury. Development of diagnostic imaging methods to assess porosity of PSBs may help to identify at-risk horses and allow for modifications of training and racing schedules to reduce the incidence of PSB fracture in Thoroughbred racehorses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To validate a luciferase bioassay, which is based on a recombinant mouse hepatoma cell line, for the detection of exposure to petroleum in mustelid species.

Animals—122 American mink (Mustela vison) and 15 sea otters (Enhydra lutris).

Procedures—Mink were exposed to Bunker C fuel oil or Alaska North Slope crude oil externally as a single exposure or internally via low dose concentrations in their ration for 6 months. Serum samples were analyzed for cytochrome P450 1A1 induction by quantification of luciferase activity in the bioassay. Mink liver specimens were also evaluated for cytochrome P450 1A1 induction by quantification of ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase activity. Serum collected from exposed and unexposed sea otters was also analyzed using the luciferase bioassay.

Results—Serum samples from mink externally exposed to petroleum had significantly increased luciferase activities at 1 week after exposure. Serum samples taken at later time points or from mink exposed to either product in the ration did not cause significant luciferase induction. Samples from otters exposed to petroleum had significantly higher luciferase induction as compared with samples from otters not exposed to petroleum at 2 and 8 years after the spill. Cytochrome P450 1A1 activity in liver specimens collected from mink that were internally exposed through diet was significantly increased at the conclusion of our study.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The luciferase bioassay is a sensitive and specific method for determining recent exposure to petroleum in mink. The lack of luciferase activity in serum samples collected from mink greater than 1 week after experimental exposure was likely attributable to lower overall petroleum exposure in our trial, compared with natural exposures. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:963–968)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research