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A Holstein heifer calf was born during an uneventful parturition in the evening and received 4 quarts of maternal colostrum within 2 hours after birth. The following morning, the calf was bloated and repeated attempts by both the owners and the referring veterinarian to reduce the abdominal distension by orogastric intubation were unsuccessful. The referring veterinarian was able to extract a small amount of feces from the rectum. On the farm, the calf received treatment with flunixin meglumine, penicillin, and electrolytes.

Clinical and Gross Findings

The 24-hour-old calf was evaluated at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate progesterone and estrogen receptor expression in meningiomas of the CNS in dogs and cats.

Animals—8 dogs (1 of which was treated with gestrinone) and 5 cats with intracranial meningiomas and 2 dogs with spinal cord meningiomas; tissue samples were also obtained from 1 clinically normal dog and 1 clinically normal cat.

Procedure—Meningioma tissue was obtained during surgery or at necropsy; samples were processed for histologic classification and immunohistochemical evaluation of the proportion of tumor cells with progesterone and estrogen receptors. Correlation among receptor expression, tumor grade, and histologic subtypes was determined.

Results—Several histologic subtypes of intracranial meningiomas were detected among tissue samples. In the cats, all intracranial meningiomas were benign. Progesterone receptor immunoreactivity was detected in 14 of 15 meningiomas. Progesterone receptor expression was identified in > 80% of cells in 8 intracranial meningiomas (4 dogs and 4 cats) and 2 spinal cord meningiomas. In samples of malignant transitional and granular cell meningiomas in dogs, progesterone receptors were detected in 32 and 4.8% of cells respectively. In 1 cat, 38% of tumor cells had progesterone receptors. In a dog treated with gestrinone, no progesterone receptors were detected in the intracranial meningioma. Estrogen receptors were only detected in the tumor of 1 dog.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate a high proportion of progesterone receptors in cells of meningiomas of the CNS in dogs and cats. Antiprogesterone treatment may have a role in the treatment of unresectable or recurrent meningiomas in dogs and cats. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1310–1318)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

A 4-year-old 11.4-kg (25.1-lb) sexually intact female Shetland Sheepdog was referred to the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Care neurology service because of sudden-onset ataxia of 12 hours' duration. At the initial evaluation, the dog's abnormalities were limited to the neurologic system.

Etiologic diagnosis—The primary differential diagnoses for this dog included meningoencephalitis (infectious or inflammatory), neoplasia (meningioma, lymphoma, glioma, ependymoma, or choroid plexus neoplasm), acute vascular event, or cyst. The diagnostic plan included a CBC, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, thoracic radiography, and abdominal ultrasonography (to evaluate for evidence of compressive, inflammatory, or infectious disease), brain MRI (with and without gadolinium

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-year-old Pionus parrot was evaluated for cachexia and partial anorexia of 3 weeks' duration. The bird was 1 of 2 privately owned birds and was on a predominantly sunflower seed–based diet with some pellets offered. The bird's history was unremarkable except for an incident approximately 1 year earlier when it flew into a river behind the owners' house. The bird was rescued and given oxygen at the local veterinary clinic.

Physical examination revealed signs of depression, severe emaciation, and tachypnea, with effort, worsened by restraint; however, auscultation did not reveal abnormalities. Palpation of the coelom revealed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Tending Animals in the Global Village—A Guide to International Veterinary Medicine . . . . Import Risk Analysis: Animals and Animal Products . . . . Exotic Pests & Disease: Biology and Economics for Biosecurity . . . . Borna Disease Virus and Its Role in Neurobehavioral Disease . . . . Foot and Mouth Disease: Facing the New Dilemmas . . . . Trends in Emerging Viral Infections of Swine . . . . Clinical Examination of Farm Animals . . . . Manual of Sheep Diseases (2nd edition) . . . . Mycotoxins: Risks in Plant, Animal, and Human Systems . . . . A Guide to Plant Poisoning of Animals in North America . . . . Diseases of Poultry (11th edition) . . . . Modern Concepts of Immunology in Veterinary Medicine—Poultry Immunology (Advances in Medical and Veterinary Immunology) . . . . Pathology of Pet and Aviary Birds . . . . Birds of Prey: Health and Disease (3rd edition) . . . . Hand-Rearing Wild and Domestic Mammals . . . . Handbook of Wildlife Chemical Immobilization (International Edition) . . . . Veterinary Anesthesia and Pain Management Secrets . . . . The Veterinary ICU Book . . . . Anatomy of the Dog: An Illustrated Text (4th Edition) . . . . The 5-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Dermatology . . . . Abdominal Radiology for the Small Animal Practitioner (Made Easy Series) . . . . Two Dimensional and M-Mode Echocardiography for the Small Animal Practitioner (Made Easy Series) . . . . Small Animal Ophthalmology Secrets . . . . Ocular Tumors in Animals and Humans . . . . Feline Oncology: A Comprehensive Guide to Compassionate Care . . . . Veterinary Medicine and Practice 25 Years in the Future and the Economic Steps to Get There
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association