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  • Author or Editor: Hiroshi Fujita x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the proportion of dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH) that successfully recovered following hemilaminectomy and fenestration, the time to ambulation (TTA) in affected dogs after surgery, and the frequency of urinary and fecal incontinence in recovered dogs and to document long-term complications.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—831 dogs with thoracolumbar IVDH treated by hemilaminectomy and concomitant disk fenestration by the same surgeon.

Procedures—For all dogs, neurologic deficits before surgery had been assessed with a modified grading system. Dogs were reexamined after surgery over a period of 3 to 6 months, and follow-up evaluation was performed at > 12 months. The proportion of dogs that neurologically improved after surgery, TTA, and incidence of fecal or urinary incontinence in recovered dogs were compared among dogs with various grades of neurologic dysfunction before surgery.

Results—Of 831 dogs, 122 had unsuccessful outcomes and 709 had successful outcomes. Of 620 dogs with intact deep nociception before surgery, 606 (97.7%) were ambulatory after surgery. Despite maintaining the ability to walk, 7 dogs were judged to have an unsuccessful outcome because the severity of ataxia did not improve. Of 211 paraplegic dogs with loss of deep nociception, 110 (52.1%) dogs became ambulatory after surgery. Long-term complications included incontinence, permanent neurologic deterioration, and self-mutilation. Dogs with paraplegia before surgery had a higher frequency of urinary or fecal incontinence, compared with dogs that were ambulatory.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prognosis for dogs with thoracolumbar IVDH that retain deep nociception in at least 1 of the pelvic limbs or tail before surgery was good.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcome of limb fracture repair in rabbits.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 139 client-owned rabbits with limb fractures treated between 2007 and 2015.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed for information on fracture location, fracture treatment, and time to fracture healing.

RESULTS 25 rabbits had fractures involving the distal aspects of the limbs (ie, metacarpal or metatarsal bones, phalanges, and calcaneus or talus). Fractures were treated in 23 of these 25 rabbits (external coaptation, n = 17; external skeletal fixation, 4; and intramedullary pinning, 2) and healed in all 23, with a median healing time of 28 days (range, 20 to 45 days). One hundred ten rabbits had long bone fractures, and fractures were treated in 100 of the 110 (external skeletal fixation, n = 89; bone plating, 1; intramedullary pinning, 3; and external coaptation, 7). The percentage of fractures that healed was significantly lower for open (14/18) than for closed (26/26) tibial fractures and was significantly lower for femoral (19/26) and treated humeral (4/6) fractures than for radial (23/24) or closed tibial (26/26) fractures. Micro-CT was used to assess fracture realignment during external skeletal fixator application and to evaluate fracture healing.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The prognosis for rabbits with limb fractures was good, with fractures healing in most rabbits following fracture repair (109/123). Micro-CT was useful in assessing fracture realignment and evaluating fracture healing.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize bone fractures and the usefulness of micro-CT for imaging fractures in pet rabbits.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—210 client-owned rabbits with bone fractures.

Procedures—Medical records of rabbits evaluated for bone fractures from 2007 through 2013 were examined. Information was collected on signalment and nature of fractures, and radiographic and micro-CT images of fractures were reviewed.

Results—Almost half (n = 95 [47.7%]) of fractures were in rabbits < 3 years old. Accidental fall was the most common cause. Vertebral fracture was the most common type of fracture with a nonneoplastic cause (n = 46 [23.2%]) and was most common in the L4-L7 region. The tibia was the most common site for limb fracture among all fractures with a nonneoplastic cause (45 [22.7%]). Twelve (5.7%) fractures had a neoplastic cause, and 7 of these were associated with metastatic uterine adenocarcinoma. Females were significantly more likely to have a fracture caused by neoplasia than were males. Compared with radiography, micro-CT provided more detailed fracture information, particularly for complicated fractures or structures (eg, skull, pelvic, vertebral, and comminuted limb fractures).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings were useful for understanding the nature of fractures in pet rabbits and supported the use of micro-CT versus radiography for fracture detection and evaluation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate peripheral blood and abdominal fluid variables as predictors of intestinal surgical site failure in dogs with septic peritonitis following celiotomy and closed-suction abdominal drain (CSAD) placement.

DESIGN Prospective study.

ANIMALS 26 dogs with septic peritonitis that underwent celiotomy and CSAD placement.

PROCEDURES Abdominal fluid and blood samples were collected prior to surgery and daily thereafter until CSAD removal. Abdominal fluid was collected through the CSAD. Analysis of all samples included pH, PCO2, PO2, PCV, WBC count, and total solids, glucose, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations. Abdominal fluid samples also underwent cytologic evaluation and bacterial culture, and the volume of fluid removed through the drain was recorded daily. The blood-to-fluid glucose and lactate differences, fluid-to-blood lactate ratio and blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios were determined daily. Dogs were categorized into 2 groups on the basis of whether they had an uneventful recovery (UR) or developed postoperative septic peritonitis (POSP).

RESULTS 23 dogs had a UR and 3 developed POSP. On the third day after surgery, the abdominal fluid WBC count was significantly lower and the blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios were significantly higher for dogs in the POSP group, compared with those for dogs in the UR group. None of the other blood and abdominal fluid variables assessed differed significantly between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results failed to identify any objective predictive indicators for POSP in dogs with CSADs. Use of blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios as predictive indicators for POSP requires further investigation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association