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  • Author or Editor: Hiroaki Suematsu x
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Objectives

To determine prevalence of gastric spiral organisms (GSO) in dogs and cats that were clinically normal or had primary gastrointestinal disease and to compare histologic lesions of the stomach in dogs and cats with and without GSO.

Animals

21 dogs and 10 cats that were clinically normal and 56 dogs and 33 cats with gastrointestinal disease.

Design

Case-control study.

Results

Unevenness of the gastric mucosal surface was detected, using endoscopic techniques in 20 and 25% of clinically normal and abnormal dogs, respectively. On histologic examination, GSO were located on the mucosal surface within or beneath the mucus, in gastric pits, and within glandular lumina in 86 and 90% of clinically normal dogs and cats, respectively, and in 61 and 64% of clinically abnormal dogs and cats, respectively. Prevalence of GSO infection in dogs and cats that were clinically abnormal was not higher than in those that were clinically normal. Infection was detected in stomachs of > 60% of dogs and cats 1 year old or less. Helicobacter pylori was not isolated from any specimen; however, specimens in which GSO were found had positive results on a urease test.

Clinical Implications

Prevalence of GSO infection was high in clinically normal and abnormal dogs and cats, some of which were young. This should be considered during assessment of clinically normal animals with GSO as they can be a potential reservoir for infection in human beings. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:529-533)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To compare histologic lesions in the stomach and duodenum of dogs and cats with and without lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis (LPE).

Design

Case-control study.

Animals

20 clinically normal dogs, 40 dogs with LPE, 10 clinically normal cats, and 20 cats with LPE.

Results

Unevenness of the mucosal surface was detected in the stomach of 4 of the 20 (20%) clinically normal dogs and 10 of the 40 (25%) dogs with LPE. Mucosal friability was detected in the duodenum of 16 (40%) of the dogs with LPE and 10 of the 20 (50%) cats with LPE. Histologically, clinically normal dogs and dogs with LPE had various degrees of fibrosis in the gastric lamina propria. All of the clinically normal cats and the cats with LPE had slight gastric fibrosis. Clinically normal cats had infiltrates of Inflammatory cells similar to those seen in the clinically normal dogs. Significantly more plasma cells and lymphocytes were seen in the duodenal lamina propria of dogs and cats with LPE than in the duodenal lamina propria of clinically normal animals.

Clinical Implications

LPE should be diagnosed by counting the number of Inflammatory cells in the duodenal lamina propria and then comparing that number with the number seen in clinically normal animals. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:95–97)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association