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  • Author or Editor: Hilary P. Benton x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether adenosine influences the in vitro release of nitric oxide (NO) from differentiated primary equine articular chondrocytes.

Sample Population—Articular cartilage harvested from the metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints of 11 horses (3 to 11 years old) without history or clinical signs of joint disease.

Procedure—Chondrocytes were isolated, plated at a high density (105 cells/well), and treated with adenosine, the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), bradykinin, or other agents that modify secondary messenger pathways alone or in combination with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant human interleukin-1α (rhIL-1α). Nitric oxide release was measured indirectly by use of the Griess reaction and was expressed as µmol of nitrite in the supernatant/µg of protein in the cell layer. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity was determined by measuring the conversion of radiolabeled arginine to radiolabeled citrulline.

Results—Treatment of chondrocytes with adenosine alone had no significant effect on NO release. However, adenosine and NECA inhibited LPS- and rhIL-1α-induced NO release. This response was mimicked by forskolin, which acts to increase adenylate cyclase activity, but not by the calcium ionophore A23187. Treatment of chondrocytes with phorbol myristate acetate, which acts to increase protein kinase C activity, potentiated LPS-induced NO release. Adenosine treatment also significantly inhibited the LPS-induced increase in iNOS activity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Adenosine and the nonspecific adenosine receptor agonist NECA inhibited inflammatory mediator-induced release of NO from equine articular chondrocytes. Modulation of adenosine receptor-mediated pathways may offer novel methods for treatment of inflammation in horses with joint disease. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:204–210)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the activities of hyaluronidases in equine sera and synovial fluid samples and sera from fetal and adult bovids and evaluate the extent to which the degradation of hyaluronan is influenced by chondrocytes.

Sample Population—Commercial and noncommercial samples of equine (n = 6) and bovine (6) sera and 16 synovial fluid samples from horses.

Procedure—Hyaluronidase activities in sera and synovial fluid samples were assessed via enzyme zymography (performed at pH 4, 5, 6, or 7). Chondrocytes were isolated from equine cartilage and cultured with or without hyaluronan (1 mg/mL); the degradation of hyaluronan was assessed via agarose gel electrophoresis.

Results—Hyaluronidase activity was detected in equine sera and synovial fluid samples at pH 4, but not at pH 7, and in bovine sera at both pH values. In all samples at pH 4, a major band of activity (molecular weight, approx 60 kd) and some additional higher molecular weight bands were detected; high- and low-molecular-weight activities were detected in bovine sera at pH 7. Hyaluronan in tissue culture medium with or without fetal calf serum was degraded in the presence, but not the absence, of equine chondrocytes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hyaluronidase activity was detected in equine sera and synovial fluid at pH 4 and in bovine sera at pH 4 and 7. Primary chondrocytes in monolayer culture can degrade exogenous hyaluronan. Modulating native hyaluronidase activity may offer a new approach to improve the quantity and quality of hyaluronan in articular joints. ( Am J Vet Res 2005;66:984–990)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate accumulation of extracellular adenosine (ADO) by equine articular chondrocytes and to compare effects of adenosine kinase inhibition and adenosine deaminase inhibition on the amount of nitric oxide (NO) produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated chondrocytes.

Sample Population—Articular cartilage from metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints of 14 horses.

Procedure—Chondrocytes were cultured as monolayers, and cells were incubated with LPS, the adenosine kinase inhibitor 5'-iodotubercidin (ITU), or the adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3- nonyl)adenine hydrochloride (EHNA). Concentrations of ADO in cell supernatants were measured by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Effect of inhibition of enzymatic metabolism of ADO on induced NO production was evaluated by exposing cells to a combination of LPS and ITU or LPS and EHNA.

Results—Articular chondrocytes accumulated extracellular ADO when exposed to LPS or ITU. Chondrocytes exposed to ITU accumulated ADO in a time-dependent manner. Unstimulated chondrocytes did not accumulate ADO. Similarly, EHNA alone did not produce detectable ADO concentrations; however, addition of EHNA and ITU resulted in a synergistic effect on accumulation of ADO. Lipopolysaccharideinduced NO production was more effectively suppressed by exposure to ITU than to EHNA

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Equine articular chondrocytes release ADO in response to the proinflammatory stimulus of bacterial LPS. Inhibition of the metabolism of ADO increases accumulation of extracellular ADO. Autocrine release of ADO from chondrocytes may play a role in the cellular response to tissue damage in arthritic conditions, and pharmacologic modulation of these pathways in joints of arthritic horses could be a potential method of therapy. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1512–1519)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research