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  • Author or Editor: Henk W. Merkens x
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Summary

Using a force plate, ground reaction force (grf) patterns at take-off and landing between the hooves and the ground were recorded for all limbs of 5 Dutch Warmbloods jumping a 0.8-m vertical fence from the right-leading canter. Distribution of the grf and force impulses over the 4 limbs at take-off and landing were considerably different from those recorded at the normal canter. At take-off, the propulsory grf of the hind limbs were 3 to 5 times higher than at the normal canter, depending on the jumping technique of the horse. At landing, the propulsory grf were mainly increased in the trailing forelimb and in both hind limbs. The vertical grf amplitudes and force impulses were of similar magnitude to those at the canter, although increases up to 160% were found in the hind limbs of the horse with the worst jumping technique. The trailing forelimb carried the highest loads, up to twice the animal's body weight; grf amplitudes tended to increase when higher fences were used. However, the jumping technique of the horse may have more influence, because an easily jumping horse could clear a 1.3-m-high fence with similar loads on the limbs.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Ground reaction force (grf) patterns from 20 clinically sound Dutch Warmbloods were recorded at the right fore-leading canter, and a standard horse was composed. These grf data for the standard can be used for evaluation of jumping horses.

The grf patterns were asymmetric for all 4 limbs. The leading right forelimb decelerated the body. The trailing left forelimb propelled the body and decelerated it slightly. The trailing left hind limb propelled, and the leading right hind limb contributed to deceleration and propulsion. Referred to the maximal vertical load of the leading right forelimb, the load of the trailing left forelimb was 25% more; the load of the right hind limb was slightly less, whereas the load of the left hind limb was about 80% of that value.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research