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Abstract

Case Description—A sexually intact male Old English Sheepdog and a sexually intact female Bull Terrier were evaluated for renal dysplasia and chronic renal failure, respectively.

Clinical Findings—Both dogs were anemic and had high serum concentrations of urea nitrogen and creatinine. Electrolyte abnormalities (calcium and phosphorus) were also evident. The decision was made to pursue renal transplantation, and donor dogs were identified.

Treatment and Outcome—End-to-side anastomosis of the renal artery and vein of each donor's left kidney to the recipient's ipsilateral external iliac artery and vein, respectively, was performed. The left caudal abdominal musculature was scarified by making an incision, and nephropexy to that musculature was performed with a simple interrupted pattern of polypropylene sutures. No intraoperative or postoperative complications associated with the vascular anastomoses were encountered. Azotemia, anemia, and electrolyte imbalances resolved after transplantation.

Clinical Relevance—The end-to-side anastomosis technique described here, which is a preferred method in human medicine, was successful, providing an alternative to other renal transplantation techniques in dogs. Additional studies are needed to determine whether any vascular anastomosis technique is preferable for use in dogs requiring renal transplantation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate features, treatment, and prognosis associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis that developed after renal transplantation in cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—29 cats.

Procedures—Medical records of cats that developed retroperitoneal fibrosis after renal transplantation at the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed for signalment, date of transplantation, age, results of urine and blood analyses, blood pressure at the time of diagnosis, infectious disease and medication anamneses, anesthetic protocols, and intraoperative complications.

Results—Of 138 transplant recipients, 29 (21%) developed clinically important retroperitoneal fibrosis. Nineteen (66%) were male, and median age at the time of renal transplantation was 8 years (range, 4 to 13 years). Median number of days after transplantation to diagnosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis was 62 (range, 4 to 730 days; mean, 125 days). The most common clinical signs were lethargy and anorexia. All affected cats were azotemic (BUN concentration > 32 mg/dL; creatinine concentration > 2.0 mg/dL) and anemic (PCV < 35%) at the time of retroperitoneal fibrosis diagnosis, although cats were nonazotemic at the time of discharge following transplantation, and anemia was less pronounced. Twenty-five cats successfully underwent surgical ureterolysis in which scar tissue was dissected away from the allograft ureter to relieve extraluminal compression. Retroperitoneal fibrosis recurred in 6 (22%) cats a median of 180 days (range, 8 to 343 days) following the original diagnosis and was treated successfully by repeated ureterolysis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Retroperitoneal fibrosis occurred in a substantial percentage of feline renal transplant recipients and should be considered a differential diagnosis in any feline renal transplant recipient with clinicopathologic findings, imaging abnormalities, or signs suggestive of obstructive uropathy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize spatial release of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CI-CSH) beads by use of an agarose tissue phantom.

SAMPLE 3-mm-diameter beads (n = 60) containing 4.6 mg of carboplatin (2.4 mg of platinum)/bead.

PROCEDURES 18 L of 1% agarose was prepared and poured into 36 containers (10 × 10 × 10 cm), each of which was filled half full (0.5 L/container). After the agarose solidified, 1, 3, 6, or 10 CI-CSH beads were placed on the agar in defined patterns. An additional 36 blocks of agar (0.5 L/block) were placed atop the beads, positioning the beads in the center of 1 L of agar. The experiment was replicated 3 times for each bead pattern for 24, 48, and 72 hours. At these times, representative agarose blocks were sectioned in the x-, y-, and z-planes and labeled in accordance with their positions in shells radiating 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm from the center of the blocks. Agarose from each shell was homogenized, and a sample was submitted for platinum analysis by use of inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy.

RESULTS Platinum diffused from CI-CSH beads at predicted anticancer cytotoxic concentrations for 2 to 5 cm.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results provided information regarding the spatial distribution of platinum expected to occur in vivo. Agarose may be used as a diffusion model, mimicking the characteristics of subcutaneous tissues. Measured platinum concentrations might be used to guide patterns for implantation of CI-CSH beads in animals with susceptible neoplasms.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To identify risk factors for urolithiasis in dogs with congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (EHPSSs) and to determine whether portoazygos shunts were associated with increased risk of urolithiasis at the initial evaluation for EHPSS.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—Dogs (n = 95) with EHPSSs confirmed via CT angiography or surgery.

Procedures—Medical records from 1999 to 2013 were reviewed. Variables of interest included signalment, previous medical management, and results of urinalysis, urolith analyses, and diagnostic imaging. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses for assessment of risk factors for urolithiasis at the time of initial EHPSS evaluation were performed.

Results—The dogs’ median age was 0.9 years (range, 0.2 to 12.6 years). Among the 95 dogs, 27 (28.4%) and 68 (71.6%) had portoazygos and portocaval shunts, respectively. Urinalysis was performed for 79 (83.2%) dogs, 29 (36.7%) of which had crystalluria (mainly ammonium urate and struvite crystals). Uroliths were present in 34 of 95 (35.8%) dogs; 16 of 17 uroliths analyzed were composed of ammonium urate. Portoazygos shunts were not associated with significantly increased odds of urolithiasis at the time of the initial evaluation for EHPSS. However, the odds of urolithiasis was significantly increased for male dogs, older dogs, and dogs that received previous medical treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with EHPSS, shunt morphology was not associated with increased odds of urolithiasis at the initial evaluation. Male dogs, older dogs, and dogs having received medical management for EHPSS prior to initial evaluation should be considered at increased risk for development of urolithiasis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize long-term elution of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CI-CSH) beads in vitro by comparing 2 distinct sample collection methods designed to mimic 2 in vivo environments.

SAMPLES 162 CI-CSH beads containing 4.6 mg of carboplatin (2.4 mg of platinum/bead).

PROCEDURES For method 1, which mimicked an in vivo environment with rapid and complete fluid exchange, each of 3 plastic 10-mL conical tubes contained 3 CI-CSH beads and 5 mL of PBS solution. Eluent samples were obtained by evacuation of all fluid at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours and 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 22, 26, and 30 days. Five milliliters of fresh PBS solution was then added to each tube. For method 2, which mimicked an in vivo environment with no fluid exchange, each of 51 tubes (ie, 3 tubes/17 sample collection times) contained 3 CI-CSH beads and 5 mL of PBS solution. Eluent samples were obtained from the assigned tubes for each time point. All samples were analyzed for platinum content by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry.

RESULTS Platinum was released from CI-CSH beads for 22 to 30 days. Significant differences were found in platinum concentration and percentage of platinum eluted from CI-CSH beads over time for each method. Platinum concentrations and elution percentages in method 2 samples were significantly higher than those of method 1 samples, except for the first hour measurements.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Sample collection methods 1 and 2 may provide estimates of the minimum and maximum platinum release, respectively, from CI-CSH beads in vivo.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize the elution of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) beads in vitro.

SAMPLE 60 carboplatin-impregnated CSH beads and 9 CSH beads without added carboplatin (controls).

PROCEDURES Carboplatin-impregnated CSH beads (each containing 4.6 mg of carboplatin [2.4 mg of platinum]) were placed into separate 10-mL plastic tubes containing 5 mL of PBSS in groups of 1, 3, 6, or 10; 3 control beads were placed into a single tube of PBSS at the same volume. Experiments were conducted in triplicate at 37°C and a pH of 7.4 with constant agitation. Eluent samples were collected at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours. Samples were analyzed for platinum content by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry.

RESULTS The mean concentration of platinum released per carboplatin-impregnated bead over 72 hours was 445.3 mg/L. Cumulative concentrations of platinum eluted increased as the number of beads per tube increased. There was a significant difference in platinum concentrations over time, with values increasing over the first 12 hours and then declining for all tubes. There was also a significant difference in percentage of total incorporated platinum released into tubes with different numbers of beads: the percentage of eluted platinum was higher in tubes containing 1 or 3 beads than in those containing 6 or 10 beads.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Carboplatin-impregnated CSH beads eluted platinum over 72 hours. Further studies are needed to determine whether implantation of carboplatin-impregnated CSH beads results in detectable levels of platinum systemically and whether the platinum concentrations eluted locally are toxic to tumor cells.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To retrospectively evaluate preoperative historical, biochemical, and cardiovascular screening data for predictors of survival to discharge and long-term survival in feline renal allograft recipients from 1 institution.

ANIMALS

166 cats that underwent renal transplantation at the University of Pennsylvania between 1998 and 2018.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed for preoperative historical information, biochemical data, and cardiac assessment including auscultation findings, pre- and postoperative systolic blood pressure measurements, thoracic radiographic evaluation, and echocardiographic measurements. The need for hemodialysis, the number of surgical procedures, native kidney biopsy diagnosis and survival time was also recorded. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to generate survival plots and estimate median survival times with a 95% CI. Univariable and multivariable analysis were performed to determine variables that were independently associated with survival to discharge and long-term survival.

RESULTS

The patient population primarily consisted of adult male DSH cats (70%) diagnosed with IRIS stage 4 CKD (66.3%). Abnormalities identified on preoperative cardiac assessment, including hypertension, the presence of a murmur, echocardiographic changes, and radiographic signs of congestive heart failure, were not associated with survival to discharge or long-term survival. Age was the only single significant variable associated with survival, and the risk of death increased by 11% (95% CI, 6% to 17%) for every 1 year in patient age.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The presence of cardiac abnormalities identified during the screening process of cats presenting for transplantation should not immediately exclude a potential candidate for the procedure. Owners considering transplantation should be educated on the impact of age on survival following surgery.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors associated with short-term (30-day) and overall survival rates in cats that underwent renal transplantation surgery (RTS).

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—94 cats that underwent RTS from 1998 through 2010.

Procedures—Data obtained from the medical records pertinent to RTS included cat signalment; anesthetic agents, techniques, and timings; supportive treatment; perioperative physiologic findings; and surgery and warm ischemia times. Associations with short-term and overall survival rates were investigated.

Results—Median survival time was 653 days (range, 2 to 4,580 days). Prolonged anesthesia (median, 300 minutes; range, 225 to 445 minutes) reduced overall survival rate but did not influence short-term survival rate. No associations were identified between survival rates and anesthetic agent used, amount and type of fluid administered IV, physiologic abnormalities, and blood product administration. All cats that received μ-opioid receptor antagonists at anesthetic recovery to reverse the effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists survived for at least 30 days. High Hct at the end of anesthesia was also associated with an increase in short-term survival rate. Two cats had an intraoperative hemoglobin oxygen saturation < 90%, and both died within 7 days after surgery. Cats > 12 years old had a lower overall survival rate than did younger cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Minimization of total anesthesia time, reversal of μ-opioid receptor agonists at the end of anesthesia, and prevention of intraoperative decreases in blood oxygen saturation and postoperative decreases in Hct appeared to help maximize postsurgical survival time in cats undergoing RTS.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 3-year-old 40.5-kg (89.1-lb) castrated male Labrador Retriever–mixed breed dog was admitted to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of a 10-day history of stridor and inspiratory obstructive dyspnea. The clinical signs were intermittent and paroxysmal (5 minutes’ duration/episode) and sometimes related to exercise.

Clinical and Gross Findings

At admission, findings of a physical examination, CBC, serum biochemical profile, urinalysis, and coagulation profile were unremarkable. The dog was breathing normally in the examination room. Tracheal radiography identified an intratracheal circular 1.7-cm-diameter soft tissue mass at the level of the fourth and fifth cervical vertebrae. The mass occupied

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare perceptions related to veterinary anesthesiologist involvement with anesthesia and pain management, benefits of a preanesthetic consultation (PAC) with an anesthesiologist, and quality of patient care between clients who did and did not participate in a PAC prior to their dogs’ elective orthopedic surgery.

SAMPLE

80 dog owners.

PROCEDURES

Owners of dogs undergoing elective stifle joint surgery participated in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to PAC and control groups (n = 40 participants/group). The PAC group participated in a PAC with an anesthesiologist and completed a written survey (12 items with Likert-type response options). The control group completed a similar survey (identical except for 2 statements related to the PAC experience) without participating in a PAC. Results were compared between groups by statistical methods.

RESULTS

The proportion of clients in the PAC group who strongly agreed with the statements that a PAC was beneficial, their questions about the pet's anesthesia and pain management plan were answered, they knew who would perform anesthesia and what safeguards were in place, veterinary specialty hospitals should have an anesthesiologist on staff, they were willing to pay more to have an anesthesiologist supervise the anesthesia and pain management, and a PAC with an anesthesiologist should be standard of care in veterinary medicine was greater than that for control group clients. Responses to quality-of-care items did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Participating in a PAC was associated with more positive perceptions of anesthesiologists and knowledge about the anesthesia plan. Further research with a validated survey instrument is needed to confirm these findings.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association