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  • Author or Editor: Heidi A. Hottinger x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate postoperative results for dogs with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis that underwent unilateral arytenoid lateralization (UAL).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—39 dogs with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and information on surgical technique, hospitalization time, postoperative treatment, and complications was obtained. Owners were contacted by telephone for additional information if necessary.

Results—In all dogs, UAL had been performed by a single surgeon who used a standard surgical technique. Long-term follow-up information was available for all 39 dogs; mean follow-up time was 29.6 months (range, 3 to 61 months). Seven (18%) dogs developed postoperative pneumonia, and 6 of the 7 recovered with treatment. Twenty-two of the 39 (56%) dogs had minor complications, including unresolved coughing or gagging, continued exercise intolerance, vomiting, and seroma formation. Owners of 35 of the 39 (90%) dogs reported an improvement in postoperative quality-oflife score. Median survival time was 12 months; only 1 dog was euthanized because of respiratory tract disease following surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that UAL will improve quality of life in most dogs with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis. However, the complication rate is high, with postoperative pneumonia being the most important major complication. Minor complications were common but did not adversely affect owner-assigned quality-of-life scores in most dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To describe preoperative, surgical, and postoperative findings and determine prognostic indicators and treatment recommendations in dogs treated surgically for gallbladder mucocele.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—22 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with gallbladder mucoceles that were treated surgically were reviewed. History, clinical signs, results of selected clinicopathologic analyses and abdominal ultrasonography, surgical procedure performed, results of histologic examination of a liver biopsy specimen, and survival time were recorded. Followup information was obtained via telephone interview with owners and referring veterinarians.

Results—Dogs were 7 to 15 years of age and had nonspecific clinical signs (vomiting, anorexia, and lethargy). Physical examination findings included icterus, signs of depression, and signs of discomfort on palpation of the abdomen . Sixteen dogs had a definitive diagnosis and 6 dogs were strongly suspected of having a gallbladder mucocele on the basis of results of abdominal ultrasonography. Fifteen dogs survived after surgery; 3 of these dogs had bile-induced peritonitis, and 4 had pancreatitis. One dog was euthanatized as a result of severe pancreatitis, and 1 was euthanatized because of acute renal failure; 5 dogs died as a result of pancreatitis, cholecystitis, or bile-induced peritonitis. Hepatic abnormalities were detected histologically in all dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No predictors of survival were identified. No associations between outcome of surgical treatment (survival vs nonsurvival) and preoperative findings, biliary rupture, surgical procedure performed, results of histologic examination of the liver, or development of pancreatitis were found. Cholecystoduodenostomy and cholecystectomy appear to be acceptable treatments for gallbladder mucocele. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1418–1422)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine frequency of postoperative complications in cats undergoing perineal urethrostomy (PU) in which poliglecaprone 25 was used for closure and identify possible predisposing factors for development of complications.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 61 cats that underwent PU.

PROCEDURES Medical records for cats that underwent PU at Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Information regarding signalment, perioperative conditions, surgical procedures, treatments, and postoperative complications were obtained from medical records and by telephone follow-up.

RESULTS 11 of 61 (18%) cats developed minor short-term (ie, ≤ 2 months after surgery) complications, 1 of 61 (1.6%) cats developed a major short-term complication requiring surgical revision, and 16 of 38 (42%) cats developed minor long-term complications. No major long-term complications were identified. Preoperative urinary tract infection was significantly associated with development of minor short-term complications, but use of an indwelling urinary catheter after surgery was not significantly associated with development of postoperative complications.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that poliglecaprone 25 may be an acceptable suture for apposition of mucosa to skin in cats undergoing PU. Short- and long-term complication rates and percentage of cats requiring revision surgery were comparable to values reported in previous studies in which slowly absorbable or nonabsorbable sutures were used.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether neoplastic mast cells extended into tissue 1, 2, or 3 cm laterally or deeper than 1 fascial plane from the visible edge of cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—21 client-owned dogs with ≥ 1 cutaneous MCT.

Procedures—After preparation for surgery, each dog's skin was marked 1, 2, and 3 cm from the tumor edge at 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°. At each 3-cm mark, deep fascia was exposed and sutured to the skin; the tumor was excised in routine fashion and fixed in formalin. Tumors were graded; margins were examined histologically for neoplastic mast cells.

Results—23 cutaneous MCTs in 21 dogs were included in this study. Fifteen (65%) tumors were located on the trunk, 5 (22%) on the hind limbs, and 3 (13%) on the head and neck. There were 3 (13%) grade-I and 20 (87%) grade-II tumors. All grade-I tumors were completely excised at all margins. Seventy-five percent of the grade-II tumors were completely excised at the 1- cm margin, and 100% were completely excised at the 2-cm margin. Two grade-II MCTs located on the hind limbs of dogs were excised with a complete but close (within 1 mm) deep margin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane appear to be adequate for complete excision of grade-I and -II MCTs in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:236–240)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

Noninvasive, computer-assisted, three-dimensional kinematic gait analysis was used to describe lameness in a chronic model of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

Design

Hind limb lameness was evaluated prior to and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament.

Animals

Seven clinically normal large dogs.

Procedure

Dynamic flexion and extension angles and angular velocities were calculated for the coxofemoral, femorotibial, and tarsal joints. Distance and temporal variables were determined. Essential Fourier coefficients were used to develop mean flexion extension curves for all joints and to compare changes in movement that developed with CCLR over time.

Results

Each joint had a characteristic pattern of flexion and extension movement that changed with CCLR. The femorotibial joint angle was more flexed throughout stance and early swing phase of stride and failed to extend in late stance. Angular velocity of the femorotibial joint was damped throughout stance phase, with extension velocity almost negligible. The coxofemoral and tarsal joint angles, in contrast to the femorotibial joint angle, were extended more during stance phase. These changes were documented as differences noted in the essential Fourier coefficients. Stride length and frequency also varied significantly after CCLR.

Conclusions

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture affects movement of the coxofemoral and tarsal joints, as well as the femorotibial joint, in gait. A pattern of joint movement may be discerned in which the coxofemoral and tarsal joints compensate for the dysfunction of the femorotibial joint.

Clinical Relevance

Methods were developed that will improve objective evaluation of CCLR and its treatment in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:120-126)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To use computer-assisted kinematic analysis to describe the walk in healthy dogs and to adapt Fourier transformation for analysis of the data.

Design

Evaluation of normal walk in dogs, using kinematic and force plate analysis.

Sample Population

15 healthy large-breed dogs.

Procedure

Morphometric data were collected to describe the sample population. Temporal and distance variables were measured to describe the walk. Flexion and extension movements were described for the scapulohumeral, cubital, carpal, coxofemoral, femorotibial, and tarsal joints. Fourier transformation was adapted to facilitate analysis of the joint angle waveforms.

Results

Unique and complex patterns of flexion and extension movements were observed for each joint studied. The walk had consistency of movement in the sample population in temporal and distance variables and joint movements. Variances attributable to intra- and interdog differences were similar and 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the mean Fourier coefficients from which they were calculated for all 6 joints. The number of essential Fourier coefficients required to represent the joint angle waveforms was 3 for the coxofemoral joint, 5 each for the femorotibial, scapulohumeral, cubital, and carpal joints, and 6 for the tarsal joint.

Conclusions

Computer-assisted kinematic gait analysis proved to be a reliable and consistent technique for assessment of movement at the walk in dogs, and Fourier transformation was shown to be an effective tool for analysis of the kinematic data.

Clinical Relevance

The database derived from the normal sample population in this study can be used as a model of musculoskeletal function at the walk for future comparisons with disease and treatment.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:381-388)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research