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  • Author or Editor: Heather Lynch x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate an association between pancreatitis and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats.

ANIMALS

154 client-owned cats: 77 cats with pancreatitis and 77 control cats with no evidence of pancreatitis.

METHODS

Retrospective record review from October 1, 2017, to October 1, 2022, including cats with gastrointestinal clinical signs, pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) ≥ 8.8 μg/L or PLI 4.5 to 8.7 μg/L with sonographic evidence of pancreatitis. Control cats had a PLI ≤ 4.4 μg/L with no sonographic evidence of pancreatitis.

RESULTS

Cats with pancreatitis had significantly higher International Renal Interest Society CKD stages than controls (P < .001; OR, 13 [95% CI, 6.3 to 31]), and mean creatinine was on average 0.79 mg/dL (95% CI, 0.56 to 1.0) higher than controls (P < .001; age covariate ANCOVA, P = .003). Odds of CKD in cats with pancreatitis compared to controls increased significantly with age (P = .002). Cats aged 10 to < 15 years and 15 to 20 years with pancreatitis had significantly higher prevalence of CKD stage 2 to 4 compared to controls (P < .001; OR, 10.9 [95% CI, 3.4 to 44]; and P = .001; OR, 66 [95% CI, 4.6 to > 1,000], respectively). Cats with pancreatitis had significantly more sonographic renal infarcts (P = .004; OR, 6.9 [95% CI, 1.8 to 46]) and concurrent diabetes mellitus (P = .002; OR, 6 [95% CI, 1.9 to 27]). Cats with pancreatitis were fed more exclusively dry-food diets compared to controls (P = .014).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Pancreatitis is associated with CKD in cats. Investigating and treating these diseases concurrently early in the disease process may reduce morbidity and mortality due to progressive disease and expensive hospitalizations. Renal infarcts may be associated with pancreatitis in cats without overt cardiac disease.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association