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  • Author or Editor: Gretchen L. Flo x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To describe clinical features of dogs < 2 years old with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) and to evaluate breed, sex, and body weight as risk factors.

Design

Case-control study.

Animals

201 dogs < 2 years old with rupture of the CCL and 804 age-matched control dogs.

Procedure

Medical records were reviewed for breed, sex, and body weight, and results were compared with results of age-matched control dogs.

Results

Breed predisposition was detected for Neapolitan Mastiff, Akita, Saint Bernard, Rottweiler, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Labrador Retriever, and American Staffordshire Terrier. Increased risk was detected for neutered males and neutered females, compared with sexually intact males and sexually intact females, respectively. Differences in prevalence of rupture of the CCL were not detected between all males and females, sexually intact males and sexually intact females, or neutered males and neutered females. Body weights of dogs with ruptured CCL were significantly greater than those of control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Several large breeds of dogs are predisposed to rupture of the CCL at a young age. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:811–814)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To define alterations of movement in dogs with hip dysplasia by use of noninvasive, 3-dimensional, computer-assisted kinematic gait analysis.

Design

Kinematic and force plate data were collected at the trot from clinically normal dogs and from dogs with hip dysplasia.

Animals

12 large adult dogs of various breeds with clinical and radiographic evidence of hip dysplasia, and 12 clinically normal adult large dogs of various breeds with body weight similar to that of the dogs with hip dysplasia.

Procedure

Dynamic flexion and extension angles and angular velocities were calculated for the coxofemoral, femorotibial, and tarsal joints. Temporal and distance variables were also computed. Essential Fourier coefficients were determined and used to reconstruct mean dynamic flexion and extension curves for all joints, and to compare differences in movement between dogs with hip dysplasia and clinically normal dogs.

Results

Dogs with hip dysplasia had subtle characteristic changes in dynamic flexion and extension angles and angular velocities of each joint, verified by significant differences in essential Fourier coefficients between the 2 study groups. Stride length was increased and peak vertical force was decreased in dogs with hip dysplasia. Subject velocity, maximal foot velocity, stance duration, stride frequency, and impulse area did not differ between the 2 groups.

Conclusions

Kinematic gait analysis indicated that hip dysplasia is associated with alterations in movement of the coxofemoral, femorotibial, and tarsal joints. Computer-assisted kinematic gait analysis provided a noninvasive, objective tool with which to evaluate these complex motion alterations.

Clinical Relevance

The information obtained may be useful in future evaluations of various modes of treatment for hip dysplasia. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:966–971)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research