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  • Author or Editor: Gregory K. Ogilvie x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine essential fatty acid concentrations in plasma and tissue before and after supplementation with n-3 fatty acids in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Animals—30 dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Procedure—Dogs received supplemental flaxseed oil (200 mg/kg/d), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 50 mg/kg/d)-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 35 mg/kg/d), or mineral oil as a placebo in a doubleblind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Clinical scores and plasma and cutaneous concentrations of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, α-linolenic acid (α-LLA), EPA, DHA, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene B4 were determined.

Results—Total plasma concentrations of α-LLA and EPA increased and those of arachidonic acid decreased significantly with administration of EPADHA, and concentrations of α-LLA increased with flaxseed oil supplementation; nevertheless, there was no significant change in the concentrations of these fatty acids or eicosanoids in the skin. There was no correlation between clinical scores and plasma or cutaneous concentrations for any of the measured fatty acids or eicosanoids.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that at the dose used, neither the concentrations of fatty acids in skin or plasma nor a decrease in the production of inflammatory eicosanoids was a major factor involved in the mechanism of action in dogs with atopy that responded to fatty acid supplementation. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:868–873)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To identify matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 in canine tumor tissue and to compare the amount of activity to that in unaffected stromal tissue.

Animals—30 dogs with spontaneously developing, high-grade osteosarcoma.

Procedure—Tumor and nearby stromal tissue (muscle) were obtained at the time of surgery. Specimens were homogenized, and supernatants were assayed, using gelatin zymography. Human derived standards were run concurrently. Densitometry was done to obtain a semiquantitative arbitrary unit value for each specimen. The amount of activity in tumor tissue was compared with the amount in stromal tissue.

Results—Gelatinolytic bands were observed from the analysis of all tumor tissues and in most stromal tissues. These bands migrated in the same molecular weight area as the human MMP 2 and 9 standards. Gelatinolytic activity could be quenched by the addition of 50 mM EDTA and 1 µg of synthetic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 2 per 100 ml. There was significantly more gelatinolytic activity in tumor tissue than in stromal tissue.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—MMP 2 and 9 are detectable in canine neoplastic tissue. matrix metalloproteinases activity in tumor tissue is higher than in unaffected stromal tissue, indicating that canine MMP may be involved in the pathogenesis of tumor growth and metastasis. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:111–114)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of various diets on the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital and the interactive effects of changes in body composition and metabolic rate.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—27 healthy sexually intact adult female Beagles.

Procedure—Pharmacokinetic studies of phenobarbital were performed before and 2 months after dogs were fed 1 of 3 diets (group 1, maintenance diet; group 2, protein-restricted diet; group 3, fat- and protein-restricted diet) and treated with phenobarbital (approx 3 mg/kg [1.4 mg/lb] of body weight, PO, q 12 h). Pharmacokinetic studies involved administering phenobarbital (15 mg/kg [6.8 mg/lb], IV) and collecting blood samples at specific intervals for 240 hours. Effects of diet and time were determined by repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results—Volume of distribution, mean residence time, and half-life (t1/2) of phenobarbital significantly decreased, whereas clearance rate and elimination rate significantly increased with time in all groups. Dietary protein or fat restriction induced significantly greater changes: t1/2 (hours) was lower in groups 2 (mean ± SD; 25.9 ± 6.10 hours) and 3 (24.0 ± 4.70) than in group 1 (32.9 ± 5.20). Phenobarbital clearance rate (ml/kg/min) was significantly higher in group 3 (0.22 ± 0.05 ml/kg/min) than in groups 1 (0.17 ± 0.03) or 2 (0.18 ± 0.03). Induction of serum alkaline phosphatase activity (U/L) was greater in groups 2 (192.4 ± 47.5 U/L) and 3 (202.0 ± 98.2) than in group 1 (125.0 ± 47.5).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clinically important differences between diet groups were observed regarding pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, changes in CBC and serum biochemical variables, and body composition. Drug dosage must be reevaluated if a dog's diet, body weight, or body composition changes during treatment. Changes in blood variables that may indicate liver toxicosis caused by phenobarbital may be amplified by diet-drug interactions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:847–852)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine toxic effects of streptozocin given in combination with a diuresis protocol in dogs and establish whether streptozocin is efficacious in treatment of pancreatic islet cell tumors in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—17 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed to obtain information regarding signalment, tumor stage and staging tests performed, number of streptozocin treatments, adverse effects, results of biochemical and hematologic monitoring during streptozocin treatment, tumor dimensions, duration of normoglycemia, and date of death, when applicable. Dogs were compared with a historical control group of 15 dogs treated surgically and medically.

Results—58 treatments were administered to the 17 dogs. Only 1 dog developed azotemia. Serum alanine aminotransferase activity increased in some dogs but decreased when treatment was discontinued. Hematologic toxicoses were rare. Vomiting during administration was uncommon but occasionally severe. Two dogs developed diabetes mellitus after receiving 5 doses. Median duration of normoglycemia for 14 dogs with stage-II or -III insulinoma treated with streptozocin was 163 days (95% confidence interval, 16 to 309 days), which was not significantly different from that for the control dogs (90 days; 95% confidence interval, 0 to 426 days). Two dogs had rapid resolution of paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy, and 2 others had measurable reductions in tumor size.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that streptozocin can be administered safely to dogs at a dosage of 500 mg/m2, IV, every 3 weeks when combined with a protocol for induction of diuresis and may be efficacious in the treatment of dogs with metastatic pancreatic islet cell tumors. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:811–818)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes in resting energy expenditure (REE) as well as protein and carbohydrate metabolism in dogs with osteosarcoma (OSA).

Animals—15 weight-stable dogs with OSA that did not have other concurrent metabolic or endocrine illness and twelve 1-year-old sexually intact female Beagles (control dogs).

Procedures—Indirect calorimetry was performed on all dogs to determine REE and respiratory quotient (RQ). Stable isotope tracers (15N-glycine, 4.5 mg/kg of body weight, IV; 6,6-deuterium-glucose, 4.5 mg/kg, IV as a bolus, followed by continuous-rate infusion at 1.5 mg/kg/h for 3 hours) were used to determine rate of protein synthesis and glucose flux in all dogs. Dualenergy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were performed to determine total body composition.

Results—Accounting for metabolic body size, REE in dogs with OSA was significantly higher before and after surgery, compared with REE of healthy control dogs. The RQ values did not differ significantly between groups. Dogs with OSA also had decreased rates of protein synthesis, increased urinary nitrogen loss, and increased glucose flux during the postoperative period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Alterations in energy expenditure, protein synthesis, urinary nitrogen loss, and carbohydrate flux were evident in dogs with OSA, similar to results documented in humans with neoplasia. Changes were documented in REE as well as protein and carbohydrate metabolism in dogs with OSA. These changes were evident even in dogs that did not have clinical signs of cachexia. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1234–1239)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of masitinib for the treatment of nonresectable mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs at 12 and 24 months after onset of treatment.

Animals—132 dogs with nonresectable grade 2 or 3 MCTs.

Procedures—Dogs received masitinib (12.5 mg/kg/d, PO; n = 106) or a placebo (26). After 6 months, treatment was extended with tumor assessments at 3-month intervals until detection of disease progression. Endpoints were tumor response and overall survival rate and time.

Results—In dogs with nonresectable MCTs, masitinib significantly improved survival rate, compared with results for the placebo, with 59 of 95 (62.1%) and 9 of 25 (36.0%) dogs alive at 12 months and 33 of 83 (39.8%) and 3 of 20 (15.0%) dogs alive at 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival time was 617 and 322 days, respectively. Tumor control at 6 months had a high predictive value for 24-month survival, with high specificity (88%) and sensitivity (76%), whereas short-term tumor response (within 6 weeks) had a poor predictive value. Complete responses at 24 months were observed in 6 of 67 (9.0%) dogs with nonresectable MCTs treated with masitinib.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Masitinib significantly increased survival rates at 12 and 24 months in dogs with nonresectable MCTs. Control of disease at 6 months, but not best response at 6 weeks, was predictive of long-term survival in dogs treated with masitinib, which suggested that short-term response may be irrelevant for assessing clinical efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of MCTs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome for dogs with grade-II mast cell tumors treated with surgery alone.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—55 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records were examined, and signalment; location and size of tumor; staging status; dates of local recurrence, metastasis, death, or last follow-up examination; status of surgical margins; previous surgery; postoperative complications; and cause of death were recorded. Follow-up information was obtained via reexamination or telephone conversations with owners or referring veterinarians. Univariate analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors.

Results—60 tumors in 55 dogs were included. Median follow-up time was 540 days. Three (5%) mast cell tumors recurred locally; median time to local recurrence was 62 days. Six (11%) dogs developed another mast cell tumor at a different cutaneous location; median time to a different location was 240 days. Three (5%) dogs developed metastases; median time to metastasis was 158 days. Fourteen dogs died; 3 deaths were related to mast cell tumor, and 7 were unrelated. The relationship with mast cell tumor was not known for 4. Median survival times were 151, 841, and 827 days, respectively, for these 3 groups. Forty-six (84%) dogs were free of mast cell tumors during the study period. A reliable prognostic factor could not be identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that additional local treatment may not be required after complete excision of grade-II mast cell tumors and that most dogs do not require systemic treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1120–1123)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of dietary n-3 fatty acids on the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

Animals—23 dogs with lymphoma in stages IIIa, IVa, and Va.

Procedure—Dogs receiving doxorubicin chemotherapy were randomly allocated to receive food with a high (test group) or low (control group) content of n-3 fatty acids. Serum doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations were measured via high-performance liquid chromatography before and 6 to 9 weeks after initiation of the diets. Lymph node concentrations of doxorubicin were assessed 6 hours after the initial treatment. Dogs' body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans.

Results—No significant differences in doxorubicin pharmacokinetics were detected between treatment groups. Significant differences existed between the first and second sampling times among all dogs for area under the curve, maximum serum concentration, and clearance. Differences in body composition did not affect measured pharmacokinetic variables. The terminal elimination half-life was longer in dogs in which a long-term remission was achieved than in dogs that did not have remission.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dietary supplementation of n-3 fatty acids is common in veterinary patients with neoplasia, but supplementation did not affect doxorubicin pharmacokinetics in this population of dogs. Explanations for the beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids other than alterations in the pharmacokinetics of chemotherapy drugs should be investigated. Dogs may metabolize drugs differently prior to remission of lymphoma than when in remission. The pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin at the time of the first administration may predict response to treatment.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research