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  • Author or Editor: Gregory D. Roberts x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare fermentation characteristics of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and other fiber substrates that are commonly found in canine diets.

Sample Population—Fecal samples from 3 adult dogs.

Procedure—The ability of fiber substrates to be used in microbial fermentation reactions was assessed by use of an in vitro fermentation system. Dogs were fed a commercially available food, and feces were collected for use as the microbial inoculum. Substrates used were beet pulp, cellulose, soy fiber, mannanoligosaccharides (MOS), FOS, and 4 inulin products (inulin 1, 2, 3, and 4). Each substrate was incubated anaerobically with fecal inoculum and growth media for 6, 12, and 24 hours, and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) was measured.

Results—Total production of SCFA was higher for fermentation of the 4 inulin products and FOS, whereas fermentation of beet pulp, MOS, and soy fiber resulted in moderate concentrations of SCFA. Fermentation of cellulose produced the lowest concentrations of total SCFA without detection of butyrate or lactate. Butyrate production was greatest for fermentation of the 4 inulin products and FOS. Total lactate production was greatest for FOS and inulin 4. As expected, production of SCFA increased for all substrates as fermentation time increased.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Canine fecal microflora ferment FOS-containing substrates in a similar manner, with little fermentation of cellulosebased carbohydrates. Furthermore, results of an in vitro fermentation system indicate that fiber type affects the metabolic activity of microorganisms, thus influencing the amount and nature of the end products of fermentation. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62: 609–615)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the esophageal passage of capsules in clinically normal cats and determine the incidence of prolonged transit or entrapment.

Animals—12 clinically normal adult cats.

Procedure—Esophageal transit of barium sulfatefilled capsules was evaluated fluoroscopically. Each cat was examined 3 times (36 examinations). Esophageal transit times were classified as normal (≤ 30 seconds) or prolonged (> 30 but ≤ 240 seconds). Capsules were considered entrapped when transit times were > 240 seconds.

Results—Transit times were normal in 10 of the 36 (27.8%) examinations, whereas times were prolonged in 7 (19.4%) examinations. Capsules became entrapped in the midcervical region of the esophagus during 19 (52.8%) examinations. Following termination of each examination, cats with entrapped capsules were fed a small amount (0.5 to 1 ounce) of food; this resulted in passage of the capsule to the stomach.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The possibility of medication-induced esophagitis should be considered when orally administering ulcerogenic drugs to cats. It is recommended that a small volume of food be given following medications to ensure complete esophageal clearance. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 655–657)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop and assess a novel ex vivo corneal culture technique involving an agarose-based dome scaffold (ABDS) for use as a model of in vivo corneal wound healing in dogs and rabbits.

SAMPLE

Corneas from clinically normal dogs (paired corneas from 8 dogs and 8 single corneas) and rabbits (21 single corneas).

PROCEDURES

8 single dog corneas (DCs), 1 DC from each pair, and 10 rabbit corneas (RCs) were wounded with an excimer laser; 1 DC from each pair and 11 RCs remained unwounded. Corneas were cultured for 21 days on ABDSs (8 pairs of DCs and all RCs) or on flat-topped scaffolds (8 single DCs). The surface area of corneal fluorescein retention was measured every 6 (DCs) or 12 (RCs) hours until full corneal epithelialization was detected. Changes in corneal clarity were evaluated at 0, 7, 14, and 21 days.

RESULTS

Median time to full epithelialization for wounded dog and rabbit corneas was 48 and 60 hours, respectively; among wounded DCs, time to full epithelization did not differ by scaffold type. After 21 days of culture on ABDSs, all DCs and RCs that epithelialized developed a circular, diffuse, cloud-like pattern of optical haze, whereas DCs cultured on flat-topped scaffolds developed a focal, crater-like region of optical haze. All corneas on the ABDSs maintained convex curvature throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Wounded ex vivo DCs and RCs cultured on ABDSs reliably epithelialized, formed optical haze (consistent with in vivo wound healing), and maintained convex curvature. This culture technique may be adaptable to other species.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the reported drug-drug interaction between the flea medication spinosad and ivermectin is attributable to inhibition of P-glycoprotein by spinosad.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs with the ABCB1 wildtype genotype.

Procedures—The study was conducted as a prospective, masked, randomized crossover design. Six dogs were allocated to 2 groups; each dog served as its own control animal. Dogs in one of the groups received spinosad at the manufacturer's recommended dose; the other group received no treatment. Forty-eight hours later, scintigraphic imaging of the head and abdomen were performed with the radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrate methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (sestamibi) in both groups of dogs. After a washout period of 60 days, the dogs in each group received the alternate treatment, and scintigraphic imaging again was performed 48 hours later. Gallbladder-to-liver and brain-to-neck musculature ratios of technetium Tc 99m sestamibi were calculated for each dog and compared between treatments.

Results—No significant differences in gallbladder-to-liver or brain-to-neck musculature ratios were found between treatments.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results provided evidence that spinosad did not inhibit P-glycoprotein function 48 hours after spinosad was administered at the manufacturer's recommended dose. Further investigations will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism of the reported toxic interaction between spinosad and ivermectin.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of bacteremia in dairy cows with naturally occurring acute coliform mastitis (ACM) with a wide range of disease severity.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—144 dairy cows with ACM from 6 herds.

Procedure—Cows were examined at time of identification of ACM (time 0) and classified as having mild, moderate, or severe mastitis on the basis of rectal temperature, hydration status, rumen contraction rate, and attitude. Cows were reexamined at 24 or 48 hours. Bacteriologic culturing of milk and blood (30 ml), CBC, and serum biochemical analysis were performed at each time point. Appropriate samples were obtained at a single point from herdmates without mastitis (controls) that were closely matched for lactation number and days since parturition. Blood culture results were compared among severity groups and controls by use of χ2 tests, as was outcome of an ACM episode for cows grouped by blood bacterial isolates.

Results—Bacteria were isolated from 52 blood samples from 46 of 144 (32%) cows with ACM, which was significantly more than control cows (11/156; 7.1%). Group-1 isolates (Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter agglomerans, and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium) were identified in 20 of 144 (14%) cows with ACM and 0 of 156 control cows. Group-1 isolates were identified in 4.3, 9.1, and 42% of cows classified as having mild, moderate, and severe ACM, respectively. Escherichia coli and K pneumoniae milk and blood isolates obtained from the same cow were of the same genotype. Bacillus spp were identified in 21 of 144 (15%) cows with ACM, which was significantly more than control cows (3/156; 1.9%). Thirty-five percent of cows with a group-1 isolate died during the mastitis episode.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that bacteremia develops in a substantial proportion of cows with ACM. Classification of severity of disease is important for establishment of effective treatment protocols; parenteral antimicrobial treatment may be indicated in cows with ACM. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:976–981)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical response and toxic effects of cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2- diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) (L-NDDP) administered IV at escalating doses to cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Animals—18 cats with oral SCC.

Procedure—Cats that failed to respond to conventional treatment or had nonresectable tumors were included. Data included a CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, cytologic examination of a fineneedle aspirate of enlarged lymph nodes, and thoracic and oral radiographs for clinical staging. A starting dose (75 to 100 mg/m2 of L-NDDP) was administered IV. At 21-day intervals, subsequent doses increased by the rate of 5 or 10 mg/m2. Response was evaluated every 21 days by tumor measurement and thoracic radiography. Quality of life was assessed by owners, using a performance status questionnaire.

Results—On average, cats received 2 treatments. Toxicoses included an intermittent, acute anaphylactoid- parasympathomimetic reaction, lethargy or sedation (≤ 24 hours), inappetence or signs of depression (≤ 72 hours), mild to moderate increase in hepatic enzyme activity, and melena. Pulmonary, renal, or hematopoietic abnormalities were not evident. Performance status surveys indicated normal behavior and grooming or decreased activity and self-care (19/20 assessments), ate well with or without assistance (15/20), and did not lose weight (15/20). Median survival time was 59.8 days (mean, 54.1 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—L-NDDP was ineffective for treatment of cats with oral SCC. None of the cats had a complete or partial remission. Acute toxicoses and poor therapeutic response limit therapeutic usefulness of L-NDDP in cats, unless dosage, frequency, and administration procedures can be improved. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 791–795)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 19-year-old Thoroughbred mare was evaluated at 265 days of gestation with a markedly distended abdomen and edema of the ventral portion of the abdomen.

Clinical Findings—The uterus was distended over the pelvic rim, making transrectal palpation of the fetus impossible. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed excessive amounts of fetal fluid. Results of analysis of fluid obtained via amnio- and allantocentesis confirmed that the amniotic cavity was large.

Treatment and Outcome—The mare was monitored for signs of weakness of the prepubic tendon and abdominal wall. The fetus and placenta were monitored for signs of stress and pending abortion. Flunixin meglumine and altrenogest were administered to the mare. Parturition was attended and occurred at 321 days' gestation. Postpartum complications in the mare included hypovolemic shock and cardiac arrhythmias. Both conditions were treated, and the mare recovered. The foal was considered small, had bilateral angular limb deformities, and was unable to nurse. The foal was given plasma for failure of passive transfer of immunity. Ten months later, the foal underwent procedures to correct limb deformities.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hydrops conditions are rare in horses, with hydrops allantois occurring more frequently than hydrops amnion; reportedly result in fetal or neonatal death; and may result in death of or injury to the mare. Close monitoring of maternal and fetal health in combination with supportive treatment of the mare can result in the safe progression of a hydrops pregnancy and the birth of a live foal.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To estimate prevalence of and identify risk factors for fecal Salmonella shedding among hospitalized horses with signs of gastrointestinal tract disease.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—465 hospitalized horses with gastrointestinal tract disease.

Procedure—Horses were classified as positive or negative for fecal Salmonella shedding during hospitalization by means of standard aerobic bacteriologic methods. The relationship between investigated exposure factors and fecal Salmonella shedding was examined by means of logistic regression.

Results—The overall prevalence of fecal Salmonella shedding was 13%. Salmonella serotype Newport was the most commonly isolated serotype (12/60 [20%]), followed by Anatum (8/60 [13%]), Java (13%), and Saint-paul (13%). Foals with gastrointestinal tract disease were 3.27 times as likely to be shedding Salmonella organisms as were adult horses with gastrointestinal tract disease. Adult horses that had been treated with antimicrobial drugs prior to hospitalization were 3.09 times as likely to be shedding Salmonella organisms as were adult horses that had not been treated with antimicrobial drugs prior to hospitalization. Adult horses that underwent abdominal surgery were 2.09 times as likely to be shedding Salmonella organisms as were adult horses that did not undergo abdominal surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a history of exposure to antimicrobial drugs prior to hospitalization and abdominal surgery during hospitalization were associated with Salmonella shedding in adult horses with gastrointestinal tract disease. Foals with gastrointestinal tract disease were more likely to shed Salmonella organisms than were adult horses with gastrointestinal tract disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:275–281)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association