Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Gordon W. Brumbaugh x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a unique dihydropyridine (BAY TG 1000) would be beneficial in preventing laminitis in horses.

Animals—16 clinically normal adult horses.

Procedure—8 pairs of horses were used in a controlled double-blind study, using sex- and agematched horses randomly assigned to treatment or control groups. Horses were subjected to carbohydrate overload to induce laminitis. Treated horses were administered BAY TG 1000 (30 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 3 days. Hoof wall surface temperature (HWST) and lameness were recorded at 4-hour intervals. The HWST was adjusted on the basis of time of onset of lameness and evaluated, using a repeated-measures ANOVA. Lameness 8 hours after onset and clinical status 72 hours after onset of lameness were evaluated, using Mann-Whitney procedures.

Results—Analysis revealed that BAY TG 1000 did not decrease the incidence of lameness but significantly ameliorated prodromal hypothermia, lessened the severity of lameness 8 hours after onset of lameness, and improved the clinical status of horses 72 hours after onset of lameness.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results support the conclusion that BAY TG 1000 was protective when used in prevention of laminitis. The drug decreased severity and improved clinical status (recovery) of induced lameness, which was interpreted to mean that the drug's actions were on mechanisms important but secondary to primary causal mechanisms of laminitis. Therefore, drugs that enhance digital perfusion via alteration of rheologic activity may have potential use in the prevention and management of laminitis in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:443–447)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of hoof wall surface temperature (HWST) as an indirect indicator of digital perfusion and to describe HWST patterns during the prodromal and acute phases of carbohydrate-induced laminitis in horses.

Animals—30 adult horses without foot abnormalities.

Procedures—Three experiments were performed. In the first, HWST was measured in 2 groups of horses acclimatized to hot (n = 6), or cold (6) environments and exposed to cold (15 C) ambient temperature. In the second experiment, HWST were measured in both forefeet of 6 horses before and after application of a tourniquet to 1 forefoot to induce vascular occlusion. In the third experiment, HWST were recorded in 12 horses before and during the prodromal and acute phases of carbohydrate-induced laminitis.

Results—Mean HWST of hot-acclimatized cold-challenged horses was significantly less than that of cold-acclimatized cold-challenged horses at all times. Transient episodes of high HWST were observed during prolonged cold-induced vasoconstriction. Hoof wall surface temperature significantly decreased during arterial occlusion and increased during reperfusion. Digital hypothermia was observed during the prodromal phase of carbohydrate-induced laminitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Determination of HWST is a valid technique to evaluate digital perfusion under appropriate controlled conditions in horses. Digital hypothermia detected during the prodromal phase of laminitis is consistent with decreased digital vascular perfusion or metabolic activity. If administered to horses during the prodromal phase, agents that enhance digital perfusion may prevent development of laminitis. (Am J Vet Res 2001; 62:1167–1172)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of a subanesthetic, continuous rate infusion of ketamine administered to healthy awake horses.

Animals—8 adult horses.

Procedures—Ketamine hydrochloride was administered to 2 horses, in a pilot study, at rates ranging from 0.4 to 1.6 mg/kg/h for 6 hours to determine an appropriate dose that did not cause adverse effects. Ketamine was then administered to 6 horses for a total of 12 hours (3 horses at 0.4 mg/kg/h for 6 hours followed by 0.8 mg/kg/h for 6 hours and 3 horses at 0.8 mg/kg/h for 6 hours followed by 0.4 mg/kg/h for 6 hours). Concentration of ketamine in plasma, heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, physical activity, and analgesia were measured prior to, during, and following infusion. Analgesic testing was performed with a modified hoof tester applied at a measured force to the withers and radius.

Results—No signs of excitement and no significant changes in the measured physiologic variables during infusion rates of 0.4 and 0.8 mg of ketamine/kg/h were found. At 6 hours following infusions, heart rate and mean arterial pressure were decreased, compared with preinfusion measurements. An analgesic effect could not be demonstrated during or after infusion. Pharmacokinetic variables for 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg/h infusions were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ketamine can be administered to awake horses at 0.4 or 0.8 mg/kg/h without adverse behavioral effects. The observed pharmacokinetic values are different than those reported for single-dose IV bolus administration of this drug.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To compare limb-load distribution between horses with and without acute or chronic laminitis.

Animals—10 horses with carbohydrate-induced acute laminitis, 20 horses with naturally occurring chronic laminitis, and 20 horses without foot abnormalities (controls).

Procedures—Limb-load distribution was determined, using a custom-designed system that allowed simultaneous quantification of the mean percentage of body weight voluntarily placed on each limb (ie, mean limb load) and the SD of the mean load over a 5- minute period (ie, load distribution profile [LDP]). Load distribution profile was used as an index of frequency of load redistribution.

Results—Mean loads on fore- and hind limbs in control horses were 58 and 42%, respectively, and loads were equally and normally distributed between left and right limbs. In addition, forelimb LDP was greater, compared with hind limbs, and was affected by head and neck movement. In comparison, limb-load distribution in horses with chronic laminitis was characterized by an increase in the preferential loading of a forelimb, a decrease in total forelimb load, and an increase in LDP that was correlated with severity of lameness. In horses with carbohydrate-induced acute laminitis, mean limb loads after onset of lameness were not different from those prior to lameness; however, LDP was significantly decreased after onset of lameness.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Quantification of limb-load distribution may be an applicable screening method for detecting acute laminitis, grading severity of lameness, and monitoring rehabilitation of horses with chronic laminitis. (Am J Vet Res 2001; 62:1393–1398)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate chemotactic, phagocytic, and bactericidal activities of bovine and porcine alveolar macrophages (AM) exposed to tilmicosin.

Animals—12 healthy calves and 12 healthy pigs.

Procedure—Lungs were obtained immediately after euthanasia; AM were collected by means of bronchoalveolar lavage and density gradient centrifugation. Chemotactic activity was evaluated by exposing AM to lipopolysaccharide or macrophage inhibitory peptide during incubation with tilmicosin. Phagocytic activity was evaluated by incubating AM with tilmicosin for 24 hours and then with tilmicosin-resistant Salmonella serotype Typhimurium. Bactericidal activity was evaluated by incubating AM with tilmicosin (0, 10, or 20 µg/ml for bovine AM; 0 or 10 µg/ml or 10 µg/ml but washed free of tilmicosin for porcine AM) and then with Mannheimia haemolytica (bovine AM) or with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae or Pasteurella multocida(porcine AM).

Results—Tilmicosin had no significant effects on chemotactic or phagocytic activities of bovine or porcine AM. The time-course of bactericidal activity was best described by polynomial equations. Time to cessation of bacterial growth and area under the time versus bacterial number curve were significantly affected by incubation of AM with tilmicosin.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results show that bactericidal activity of bovine and porcine AM was enhanced by tilmicosin, but not in proportion to the reported ability of AM to concentrate tilmicosin intracellularly. With or without exposure to tilmicosin, the time-course of bactericidal activity of bovine AM against M haemolytica and of porcine AM against A pleuropneumoniae or P multocida was too complex to be reduced to a simple linear equation. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:36–41)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the serologic response of calves to inactivated and modified-live (ML) Mannheimia haemolytica (MH) preparations given alone and concurrently with combination viral vaccines containing ML bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1).

Animals—642 calves seronegative for BHV-1.

Procedures—In experiment 1, 192 calves received 1 of 3 MH preparations alone or concurrently received 1 of 3 MH preparations and 1 of 4 combination viral vaccines. In experiment 2, 450 calves received 1 of 4 MH preparations alone or concurrently received 1 of 4 MH preparations and 1 of 5 combination viral vaccines. Pretreatment and posttreatment blood samples were processed to obtain serum, which was analyzed to detect concentrations of antibodies against MH leukotoxin and BHV-1.

Results—In experiment 1, antibody titers against MH leukotoxin in calves receiving MH and ML virus vaccine appeared decreased, albeit nonsignificantly, compared with titers for calves receiving MH preparations alone. In experiment 2, all groups (except for 1) concurrently receiving an MH preparation and viral vaccine had a significant decrease in antibodies against MH leukotoxin. In both experiments, there was a significant decrease in the number of calves responding to MH leukotoxin when ML viral vaccine was coadministered.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Coadministration of ML BHV-1 and MH preparations interfered with the serologic response to MH leukotoxin in calves seronegative for BHV-1. Serologic response to MH leukotoxin may be substantially improved in seronegative calves when MH vaccination is delayed until after calves have received a dose of ML BHV-1 vaccine.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research