Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for

  • Author or Editor: Geof W. Smith x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a combination of vaccination and extended intramammary antimicrobial treatment would eliminate chronic intramammary Staphylococcus aureus infections in lactating dairy cows.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—50 dairy cows with chronic mastitis caused by S aureus.

Procedure—Cows were identified and paired within herd on the basis of days in milk, lactation number, milk production, and numbers of quarters infected. Treated cows (n = 20) received 3 doses of a polyvalent S aureus bacterin on days 1, 15, and 21 of the study along with intramammary administration of pirlimycin in all 4 quarters once daily for 5 treatments (days 16 to 20). Control cows (n = 23) received no treatment. Follow-up samples for bacteriologic culture were collected for at least 3 months after treatment to determine treatment success rates.

Results—Significantly more S aureus infections were eliminated from treated cows (8/20 [40%]), compared with control cows (2/23 [9%]). The proportion of infected quarters that yielded negative results throughout the follow-up period was also significantly higher in treated cows (13/28 [46%]) than in control cows (2/41 [5%]).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that a combination of vaccination and antimicrobial treatment can be successful in eliminating some cases of chronic intramammary S aureus infections in dairy cattle. However, it is important to consider extended treatment protocols carefully because many cows are likely to remain infected with S aureus despite treatment and vaccination.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of 2 commercially available colostrum replacement products on serum IgG and total protein concentrations in dairy calves.

Design—Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—84 Holstein bull calves from a single dairy.

Procedures—Calves were randomly assigned to be given 4 quarts of colostrum (group 1; n = 21), 2 packages of a colostrum replacement product (product A; group 2; 21), 1 package of a different colostrum replacement product (product B; group 3; 21), or 2 packages of product B (group 4; 21). Treatments were given within 3 hours after birth, and blood samples were collected 24 hours later and submitted for determination of serum total protein and IgG concentrations.

Results—Group 1 calves had significantly higher serum total protein and IgG concentrations than did calves in the other 3 groups. However, the percentage of calves with adequate passive transfer (ie, serum IgG concentration > 1,000 mg/dL) was not significantly different among groups 1 (90%), 3 (81%), and 4 (95%). In contrast, only 10% of calves in group 2 had adequate passive transfer. It was predicted that calves fed product B that had serum total protein concentrations > 5.2 g/dL would have serum IgG concentrations > 1,000 mg/dL at least 90% of the time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that product B could be considered as an alternative to colostrum in dairy calves, but product A failed to routinely provide adequate serum IgG concentrations when fed according to label directions.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of 3 commercially available, orally administered electrolyte solutions (OAEs) on abomasal luminal pH and emptying rate in dairy calves, compared with the effect of orally administered milk replacer.

Design—Randomized crossover study.

Animals—6 male dairy calves (age, 12 to 31 days).

Procedures—Calves were surgically instrumented with an abomasal cannula and were administered 4 treatments in randomized order: all-milk protein milk replacer, high-glucose high-bicarbonate OAE, high-glucose high-bicarbonate OAE containing glycine, and low-glucose OAE containing acetate and propionate. Abomasal luminal pH was measured with a miniature glass pH electrode prior to treatment administration and every second afterward for 24 hours.

Results—Feeding of orally administered milk replacer resulted in a rapid increase in mean abomasal luminal pH from 1.3 to 5.8, followed by a gradual decrease to preprandial values by 8 hours afterward (mean 24-hour pH, 3.2). High-glucose high-bicarbonate OAEs caused a large and sustained increase from 1.3 to 7.5 (mean 24-hour pH, 4.1 for the solution without glycine and 3.5 for the solution with glycine). In contrast, feeding of the acetate-containing OAE was followed by only a mild and transient increase (mean 24-hour pH, 2.1); luminal pH returned to preprandial values by 3 hours after ingestion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ingestion of a bicarbonate-containing OAE resulted in sustained abomasal alkalinization in dairy calves. Because persistently high abomasal luminal pH may facilitate growth of enteropathogenic bacteria, administration of OAEs containing a high bicarbonate concentration (> 70mM) is not recommended for calves with diarrhea.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether pharmacokinetics and milk elimination of flunixin and 5-hydroxy flunixin differed between healthy and mastitic cows.

Design—Prospective controlled clinical trial.

Animals—20 lactating Holstein cows.

Procedures—Cows with mastitis and matched control cows received flunixin IV, ceftiofur IM, and cephapirin or ceftiofur, intramammary. Blood samples were collected before (time 0) and 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 36 hours after flunixin administration. Composite milk samples were collected at 0, 2, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, and 96 hours. Plasma and milk samples were analyzed by use of ultra–high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

Results—For flunixin in plasma samples, differences in area under the concentration-time curve and clearance were detected between groups. Differences in flunixin and 5-hydroxy flunixin concentrations in milk were detected at various time points. At 36 hours after flunixin administration (milk withdrawal time), 8 cows with mastitis had 5-hydroxy flunixin concentrations higher than the tolerance limit (ie, residues). Flunixin residues persisted in milk up to 60 hours after administration in 3 of 10 mastitic cows.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pharmacokinetics and elimination of flunixin and 5-hydroxy flunixin in milk differed between mastitic and healthy cows, resulting in violative residues. This may partially explain the high number of flunixin residues reported in beef and dairy cattle. This study also raised questions as to whether healthy animals should be used when determining withdrawal times for meat and milk.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the elimination kinetics of ceftiofur hydrochloride in milk after intramammary administration in lactating dairy cows.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—5 lactating dairy cows.

Procedure—After collection of baseline milk samples, 300 mg (6 mL) of ceftiofur was infused into the left front and right rear mammary gland quarters of each cow. Approximately 12 hours later, an additional 300 mg of ceftiofur was administered into the same mammary gland quarters after milking. Milk samples were collected from each mammary gland quarter every 12 hours for 10 days. Concentrations of ceftiofur and its metabolites in each milk sample were determined to assess the rate of ceftiofur elimination.

Results—Although there were considerable variations among mammary gland quarters and individual cows, ceftiofur concentrations in milk from all treated mammary gland quarters were less than the tolerance (0.1 µg/mL) set by the FDA by 168 hours (7 days) after the last intramammary administration of ceftiofur. No drug concentrations were detected in milk samples beyond this period. Ceftiofur was not detected in any milk samples from nontreated mammary gland quarters throughout the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ceftiofur administered by the intramammary route as an extralabel treatment for mastitis in dairy cows reaches concentrations in milk greater than the tolerance set by the FDA. Results indicated that milk from treated mammary gland quarters should be discarded for a minimum of 7 days after intramammary administration of ceftiofur. Elimination of ceftiofur may be correlated with milk production, and cows producing smaller volumes of milk may have prolonged withdrawal times. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1827–1830)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the plasma pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin between 3-week-old (preweaned) and 6-month-old (weaned) calves and to characterize the distribution of tulathromcyin into pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) of preweaned and weaned calves following SC administration of a single dose (2.5 mg/kg).

ANIMALS 8 healthy 3-week-old and 8 healthy 6-month-old Holstein steers.

PROCEDURES A jugular catheter and SC ultrafiltration probe were aseptically placed in the neck of each calf before tulathromycin administration. Blood, ISF, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected at predetermined times before and after tulathromycin administration for quantification of drug concentration. A urea dilution method was used to estimate tulathromycin concentration in PELF from that in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tulathromycin–plasma protein binding was determined by in vitro methods. Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined by a 2-compartment model. Pharmacokinetic parameters and drug concentrations were compared between preweaned and weaned calves.

RESULTS Clearance and volume of distribution per fraction of tulathromycin absorbed were significantly greater for weaned calves than preweaned calves. Tulathromycin–plasma protein binding was significantly greater for weaned calves than preweaned calves. Maximum PELF tulathromycin concentration was significantly greater than the maximum plasma and maximum ISF tulathromycin concentrations in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that age affected multiple pharmacokinetic parameters of tulathromycin, likely owing to physiologic changes as calves mature from preruminants to ruminants. Knowledge of those changes may be useful in the development of studies to evaluate potential dose adjustments during treatment of calves with respiratory tract disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Calfhood diseases have major negative economic consequences on beef and dairy operations owing to costs associated with treatment, long-term effects on growth and performance, and death of affected calves. 1–3 The number of drugs approved for the treatment of diseased calves by the FDA is limited; however, veterinarians have the authority to administer drugs in an extralabel manner to that class of animals under provisions established by AMDUCA. 4 Nevertheless, drug labels that state, “a withdrawal period has not been established for this product in preruminating calves” can cause confusion about whether those drugs can or cannot be

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe plasma pharmacokinetic parameters and tissue elimination of flunixin in veal calves.

ANIMALS 20 unweaned Holstein calves between 3 and 6 weeks old.

PROCEDURES Each calf received flunixin (2.2 mg/kg, IV, q 24 h) for 3 days. Blood samples were collected from all calves before the first dose and at predetermined times after the first and last doses. Beginning 24 hours after injection of the last dose, 4 calves were euthanized each day for 5 days. Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by compartmental and noncompartmental methods.

RESULTS Mean ± SD plasma flunixin elimination half-life, residence time, and clearance were 1.32 ± 0.94 hours, 12.54 ± 10.96 hours, and 64.6 ± 40.7 mL/h/kg, respectively. Mean hepatic and muscle flunixin concentrations decreased to below FDA-established tolerance limits (0.125 and 0.025 μg/mL, respectively) for adult cattle by 3 and 2 days, respectively, after injection of the last dose of flunixin. Detectable flunixin concentrations were present in both the liver and muscle for at least 5 days after injection of the last dose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The labeled slaughter withdrawal interval for flunixin in adult cattle is 4 days. Because administration of flunixin to veal calves represents extralabel drug use, any detectable flunixin concentrations in edible tissues are considered a violation. Results indicated that a slaughter withdrawal interval of several weeks may be necessary to ensure that violative tissue residues of flunixin are not detected in veal calves treated with that drug.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine elimination kinetics of tilmicosin in milk following intramammary administration in lactating dairy cattle.

Design—Prospective pharmacokinetic study.

Animals—6 lactating dairy cows.

Procedures—Following collection of baseline milk samples, 1,200 mg (4 mL) of tilmicosin was infused into the left front and right rear mammary glands of each cow. Approximately 12 hours later, an additional 1,200 mg of tilmicosin was infused into the left front and right rear glands after milking. Milk samples were then collected from each gland at milking time for 40 days. Concentration of tilmicosin was determined by means of ultraperformance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and a milk withdrawal interval for tilmicosin was calculated on the basis of the tolerance limit method.

Results—Although there was considerable variation between glands, concentration of tilmicosin was high in milk from treated glands and had a long half-life in treated and untreated glands. Tilmicosin was detected in all treated glands for the entire 40-day study period and was detected in untreated glands for approximately 30 to 35 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings indicated that tilmicosin should not be administered by the intramammary route in lactating dairy cows. Milk from all glands of any cows accidentally treated should be discarded for a minimum of 82 days following intramammary administration.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association