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  • Author or Editor: Gary W. Ellison x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate signalment, clinical findings, surgical treatment, and long-term outcomes in puppies and kittens after surgical repair of various types of atresia ani (AA) with or without concomitant anogenital or rectogenital malformations.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—11 puppies and 1 kitten.

Procedures—Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were reviewed for puppies and kittens that underwent surgical treatment for AA. Information regarding signalment, diagnosis, surgical procedures, follow-up time, and outcome was recorded. A previously described classification scheme was used to classify AA as type I, II, III, or IV. Follow-up times and outcomes were evaluated.

Results—AA was classified as type I in 3 animals, type II in 6, and type III in 3. Nine of 12 patients had anogenital or rectogenital malformations; 8 of these had rectovaginal fistulas. Eleven animals underwent in situ anoplasty, and 1 underwent surgery in which the rectovaginal fistula was used for anal reconstruction. Six also underwent balloon dilation for treatment of anal stenosis, and revision anoplasty was performed in 5. All patients with type I or II AA survived ≥ 1 year. Two puppies with type III AA were euthanized 3 and 40 days after surgery. Follow-up time for the remaining 10 patients ranged from 12 to 92 months, and 3 had fecal incontinence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Surgical repair of type I or II AA resulted in long-term survival and fecal continence in most cases. Although numbers were small, patients with type III AA had poorer outcomes than did those with type I or II AA.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

  • Ischemic neuromyopathy and paraplegia in cats are commonly associated with aortic thromboembolism.

  • Occlusion of the abdominal aorta by a foreign body may also result in ischemic neuromyopathy and paraplegia; however, the prognosis for cats with paraplegia secondary to an aortic foreign body may be better than that for cats with paraplegia secondary to aortic thromboembolism.

  • Collateral circulation may develop as a result of aortic occlusion by a foreign body. Progression of the collateral circulation may allow for clinical improvement without surgical intervention.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes for kittens with phimosis and to develop a system to classify phimosis on the basis of gross pathological lesions.

ANIMALS

8 kittens with phimosis.

PROCEDURES

Medical record databases of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were searched to identify records of cats ≤ 20 weeks old (ie, kittens) with phimosis that underwent surgical intervention between 2009 and 2017. For each kitten, information extracted from the record included signalment, history, clinical signs, physical examination findings, treatments, and details regarding the surgical procedure performed, postoperative complications, and outcome.

RESULTS

The most common clinical signs were stranguria (n = 6), marked preputial swelling (5), and a small (6) or inevident (2) preputial orifice. Six kittens had type 1 phimosis (generalized preputial swelling owing to urine pooling without penile-preputial adhesions) and underwent circumferential preputioplasty. Two kittens had type 2 phimosis (focal preputial swelling and urine pooling in the presence of penile-preputial adhesions) and underwent preputial urethrostomy. No postoperative complications were recorded for kittens that underwent preputial urethrostomy. All 6 kittens that underwent circumferential preputioplasty had some exposure of the tip of the penis immediately after surgery, which typically resolved over time. At the time of last follow-up (mean, 1.4 years after surgery), all 8 patients were able to urinate and had no signs of phimosis recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that circumferential preputioplasty and preputial urethrostomy could be used to successfully manage kittens with type 1 and type 2 phimosis, respectively.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare required time and costs of surgery and hospitalization as well as prevalence of incomplete urinary cystolith removal associated with laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy versus open cystotomy in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—20 dogs with urolithiasis treated by laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy and 23 dogs treated by open cystotomy.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Surgery cost, hospitalization cost, total cost, surgery time, days in hospital, incomplete cystolith removal, and number of doses of analgesic administered IV after surgery were compared between the laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy and open cystotomy groups.

Results—Surgery cost and total cost were significantly higher in the laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy group. Hospitalization cost, days in hospital, and prevalence of incomplete cystolith removal did not differ significantly between groups. Number of doses of analgesic was significantly lower in the laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy was more time-consuming and expensive but associated with fewer postoperative doses of injectable analgesics, compared with open cystotomy. Laparoscopic-assisted cystotomy is an acceptable, more expensive, and minimally invasive alternative to open cystotomy for the removal of urinary cystoliths in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association