Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Gary R. Johnston x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 15 dogs with vaginal septa, examined between April 1983 and December 1992, were reviewed. Overall prevalence of vaginal septation at the hospital during the study period was 0.03%. Thirteen breeds were represented; mean age at the time of initial examination was 2.4 years. Owners’ original complaints included inability to breed naturally, dysuria, urinary incontinence, infertility, recurrent vaginitis, ambiguous external genitalia, and dystocia. One dog did not have clinical signs associated with the vaginal septum. In 11 of the 15 dogs, the septum could be palpated during digital vaginal examination. The septum could be seen in 6 of the 7 dogs in which vaginoscopy was performed. Twelve of the 15 dogs underwent positive-contrast vaginography; in all 12, the septum could be easily seen. Four of the 15 dogs underwent removal of the septum, with or without episiotomy, and 4 others were ovariohysterectomized. One dog was bred by means of artificial insemination and became pregnant. The remaining 6 dogs were lost to follow-up.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride on prostatic diameter and volume, semen quality, and serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone concentrations in dogs with spontaneous benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).

Design—Double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

Animals—9 dogs with BPH.

Procedure—Five dogs were treated with finasteride for 16 weeks (0.1 to 0.5 mg/kg [0.05 to 0.23 mg/lb] of body weight, PO, q 24 h); the other 4 received a placebo. Prostatic diameter, measured radiographically, prostatic volume, measured ultrasonographically, semen quality, and serum DHT and testosterone concentrations were evaluated before and during treatment. After receiving the placebo for 16 weeks, the 4 control dogs were treated with finasteride for 16 weeks, and evaluations were repeated.

Results—Finasteride significantly decreased prostatic diameter (mean percentage decrease, 20%), prostatic volume (mean percentage decrease, 43%), and serum DHT concentration (mean percentage decrease, 58%). Finasteride decreased semen volume but did not adversely effect semen quality or serum testosterone concentration. No adverse effects were reported by owners of dogs in the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that finasteride can be used to reduce prostatic size in dogs with BPH without adversely affecting semen quality or serum testosterone concentration. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1275–1280)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

For 16 dogs with testicular neoplasia (n = 19 tumors), ultrasonography was performed to determine whether a correlation exists between ultrasonographic features of testicular tumors and cell type. The echogenicity of the tumors varied depending on the size of the tumor and whether the tumor had focal or diffuse distribution within the testis. The ultrasonographic characteristics of Sertoli cell tumors were variable, with no predominant pattern. This variation may be related to tumor size, because 6 of 7 Sertoli cell tumors were > 5 cm in diameter. Focal seminomas and interstitial cell tumors < 3 cm in diameter had hypoechoic texture. Focal seminomas and interstitial cell tumors > 3 cm in diameter had mixed echogenicity. Tumors of multiple cell types were > 5 cm in diameter and had mixed echogenicity. In valuable breeding dogs with a small (< 3 cm) focal intrascrotal lesion, testicular ultrasonography would be of benefit for localization of the mass to the testis or epididymis for subsequent biopsy. In dogs with intra-abdominal neoplastic testes, ultrasonography may be of benefit in determining intra-abdominal metastases and invasion of contiguous structures.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The efficacy of a diet designed to facilitate dissolution of feline magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) uroliths was evaluated in 30 cases of urocystoliths, involving 27 cats. The number of urocystoliths per cat varied from 1 to 5. In 20 cases of urolithiasis, sterile struvite uroliths dissolved in a mean of 36 days after initiation of dietary treatment. In 5 cases of urolithiasis, struvite urocystoliths associated with urease-negative bacterial urinary tract infection dissolved in a mean of 23 days after initiation of dietary and antimicrobial treatment. In 3 cases of urolithiasis, struvite urocystoliths associated with urease-positive staphylococcal urinary tract infection dissolved in a mean of 79 days after initiation of dietary and antimicrobial treatment. Dissolution of uroliths in cats fed the treatment diet was associated with concomitant remission of dysuria, hematuria, and pyuria, and reduction in urine pH and struvite crystalluria. In one case, a urocystolith composed of 100% ammonium urate, and in another case, a urolith composed of 60% calcium phosphate, 20% calcium oxalate, and 20% magnesium ammonium phosphate did not dissolve.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine long-term results of various treatments for traumatic coxofemoral joint dislocation in dogs.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

64 dogs that underwent closed reduction and bandage stabilization, extracapsular suture stabilization, transacetabular pinning, toggle pinning, DeVita pinning, or femoral head and neck excision.

Procedure

Follow-up evaluations included owner evaluation (64 dogs), physical evaluation (23), and radiography (19). Follow-up time ranged from 8 to 156 months.

Results

Owner evaluation scores after closed reduction were significantly better than scores after DeVita pinning, extracapsular suture stabilization, and femoral head and neck excision. On physical examination, 6 of 23 dogs were lame on the side of the previous dislocation. Signs of pain and crepitation were evident during palpation of 12 and 8 of 25 joints, respectively. Thirteen of 21 joints had radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease. There was a greater progression of degenerative joint disease in previously dislocated joints than in unaffected joints. There were not any significant differences between treatments in regard to results of physical and radiographic evaluation. Time between trauma and treatment and existence of concomitant injuries did not influence follow-up results, but there was a significant association between body weight and radiographic evaluation score.

Clinical Implications

Concomitant injuries do not appear to justify a worse prognosis in dogs with traumatic coxofemoral joint dislocation, nor does a delay in treatment of > 3 days. Gait abnormalities and degenerative joint disease might develop in the long term. Proper body weight should be maintained regardless of treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997; 210:59–64)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

In a prospective study, 141 cats with hematuria, dysuria, urethral obstruction, or combinations of these signs were evaluated by contemporary diagnostic methods and compared with 26 clinically normal cats (controls). Specific diagnosis was established in 45% (64/141) of cats affected with lower urinary tract disease (lutd). Crystalline matrix plug-induced urethral obstruction was diagnosed in 21% (30/141) of affected cats, uroliths were identified in 21% (30/141) of affected cats, uroliths with concomitant bacterial urinary tract infection (uti) were identified in < 2% (2/141) of affected cats, and bacterial uti alone was identified in < 2% (2/141) of cats with lutd. Viruses, mycoplasmas, and ureaplasmas were not isolated from urine samples collected from affected or control cats.

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (bhv-4)-neutralizing antibodies were not detected in any serum sample obtained from cats with lutd or from control cats. In contrast, bhv-4 antibodies were detected by an indirect immunofluorescent antibody (ifa) test in sera obtained from 31% (44/141) of cats with lutd and 23% (6/26) of control cats. The prevalence of positive bhv-4 ifa test results in affected cats was not significantly different from that observed in control cats. Significant association was not apparent between positive bhv-4 ifa test results and clinical diagnosis, abnormal laboratory findings, or cat age. However, the number of male cats with bhv-4 ifa titer was significantly (P < 0.02, χ2 test) greater than that of female cats. Detection of bhv-4 antibodies in approximately 30% of affected and control cats indicates prior virus exposure. Further investigations are warranted to clarify the specific role of bhv-4 in cats with naturally acquired lutd.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association