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  • Author or Editor: Gal Kelmer x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate pelvic movement over a large number of strides in sound horses and in horses with induced hind limb lameness by applying methods to the pelvis that have been described for evaluating vertical head movement in horses with induced forelimb lameness.

Animals—17 adult horses.

Procedure—Horses were filmed while trotting on a treadmill before and after induction of transient mild and moderate hind limb lamenesses. Vertical pelvic movement was measured by a signal decomposition method. The vertical pelvic signal was decomposed into a periodic component (A1) that occurred at half the stride frequency (representing vertical pelvic movement caused by lameness) and another periodic component (A2) that occurred at stride frequency (representing normal vertical pelvic movement of a trotting horse). Vertical pelvic and foot positions were correlated for each stride to compare the difference between the minimum and maximum heights of the pelvis during and after stance of the right hind limb to the minimum and maximum heights of the pelvis during and after stance of the left hind limb.

Results—Maximum pelvic height difference and lameness amplitude (A1) differed significantly between sound and mild or moderate hind limb lameness conditions. Mean A1 value for vertical pelvic movement in sound horses was less than that previously reported for vertical head movement.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pelvic height differences and signal decomposition of pelvic movement can be used to objectively evaluate hind limb lameness in horses over a large number of strides in clinical and research settings. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65: 741–747)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize compensatory movements of the head and pelvis that resemble lameness in horses.

Animals—17 adult horses.

Procedure—Kinematic evaluations were performed while horses trotted on a treadmill before and after shoe-induced lameness. Lameness was quantified and the affected limb determined by algorithms that measured asymmetry in vertical movement of the head and pelvis. Induced primary lameness and compensatory movements resembling lameness were assessed by the Friedman test. Association between induced lameness and compensatory movements was examined by regression analysis.

Results—Compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral forelimb were seen with induced lameness of a hind limb. There was less downward and less upward head movement during and after the stance phase of the ipsilateral forelimb. Doubling the severity of lameness in the hind limb increased severity of the compensatory movements in the ipsilateral forelimb by 50%. Compensatory movements resembling lameness of the hind limb were seen after induced lameness in a forelimb. There was less upward movement of the pelvis after the stance phase of the contralateral hind limb and, to a lesser extent, less downward movement of the pelvis during the stance phase of the ipsilateral hind limb. Doubling the severity of lameness in the forelimb increased compensatory movements of the contralateral hind limb by 5%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Induced lameness in a hind limb causes prominent compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral forelimb. Induced lameness in a forelimb causes slight compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral and contralateral hind limbs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:646–655)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research