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  • Author or Editor: G. K. Ogilvie x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Serum α1-acid glycoprotein (α1 ag) concentrations were determined in 55 dogs with previously untreated, histologically confirmed, high-grade lymphoblastic lymphoma, and in 34 dogs with histologically confirmed nonhematopoietic malignancies (13 dogs with carcinomas and 21 dogs with sarcomas). Serum concentrations were again determined in 32 dogs with lymphoma that were in complete remission 3 weeks after 1 dose of doxorubicin (30 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) and in 22 dogs that were still in complete remission 3 weeks after a fourth dose of doxorubicin. For comparison, serum α1 ag concentrations were measured in 19 clinically normal (control) dogs of similar weight and age. Eight of the control dogs were given 1 dose of doxorubicin (30 mg/m2, iv), and serum α1 ag concentrations were measured 3 weeks later.

In control dogs, mean serum α1 ag concentration after treatment with doxorubicin was not significantly different from mean concentration before treatment. Mean α1 ag concentrations in untreated dogs with lymphoma, in dogs with sarcomas, and in dogs with carcinomas were all significantly higher than mean concentration for untreated control dogs. In addition, the mean concentration for dogs with osteosarcomas was significantly higher than mean concentration for untreated control dogs. There were no significant differences in mean serum α1 ag concentrations among dogs with different clinical stages of lymphoma (stage IIIa, stage IVa, stage Va). However, mean serum α1 ag concentrations were were significantly increased for dogs with stages IIIa,, IVa, and Va lymphoma, compared with mean concentration for untreated control dogs. Mean serum α1 ag concentrations were significantly decreased in dogs with lymphoma that were in complete remission after either 1 or 4 doses of doxorubicin, compared with mean concentration in dogs with lymphoma that had not been treated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Of 82 dogs with thyroid carcinoma seen between January 1981 and October 1989, 20 had freely movable tumors without evidence of metastasis and were treated with surgical excision alone. Uncensored mean and median survival times for these 20 dogs were both 20.5 months. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, which censors for nontumor-related deaths and dogs lost to follow-up, indicated that median survival time was greater than 36 months. Seven dogs died of tumor-related causes: 2 died because of metastasis or local recurrence of the tumor, 5 died of treatment-related complications (eg, laryngeal paralysis, hypocalcemia, tracheostomy complications). Eight dogs died of unrelated causes; 1 dog was lost to follow-up at 26 months after surgery; 3 dogs were alive 19, 24, and 26 months after surgery. Cause of death could not be determined in the remaining dog. Long-term survival is possible following surgical removal of mobile thyroid carcinomas in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of masitinib for the treatment of nonresectable mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs at 12 and 24 months after onset of treatment.

Animals—132 dogs with nonresectable grade 2 or 3 MCTs.

Procedures—Dogs received masitinib (12.5 mg/kg/d, PO; n = 106) or a placebo (26). After 6 months, treatment was extended with tumor assessments at 3-month intervals until detection of disease progression. Endpoints were tumor response and overall survival rate and time.

Results—In dogs with nonresectable MCTs, masitinib significantly improved survival rate, compared with results for the placebo, with 59 of 95 (62.1%) and 9 of 25 (36.0%) dogs alive at 12 months and 33 of 83 (39.8%) and 3 of 20 (15.0%) dogs alive at 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival time was 617 and 322 days, respectively. Tumor control at 6 months had a high predictive value for 24-month survival, with high specificity (88%) and sensitivity (76%), whereas short-term tumor response (within 6 weeks) had a poor predictive value. Complete responses at 24 months were observed in 6 of 67 (9.0%) dogs with nonresectable MCTs treated with masitinib.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Masitinib significantly increased survival rates at 12 and 24 months in dogs with nonresectable MCTs. Control of disease at 6 months, but not best response at 6 weeks, was predictive of long-term survival in dogs treated with masitinib, which suggested that short-term response may be irrelevant for assessing clinical efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of MCTs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To characterize the frequency, clinical signs, biologic behavior, and response to treatment of tumors of the ear canal in dogs and cats.

Design

Retrospective analysis of medical records.

Animals

Medical records of 81 dogs (48 malignant tumors, 33 benign tumors) and 64 cats (56 malignant tumors, 8 benign tumors).

Procedure

Data were analyzed for cats and dogs with malignant tumors, and risk factors were analyzed for their potential impact on survival time.

Results

Malignant tumor types most commonly reported included ceruminous gland adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and carcinoma of undetermined origin. Median survival time of dogs with malignant aural tumors was > 58 months, whereas that of cats was 11.7 months. A poor prognosis was indicated by extensive tumor involvement (dogs) and by neurologic signs at time of diagnosis, diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma or carcinoma of undetermined origin, and invasion into lymphatics or blood vessels (cats).

Clinical Implications

Malignant tumors of the ear canal in dogs and cats have a propensity for local invasion, but tend not to metastasize. Squamous cell carcinoma and carcinoma of undetermined origin were the most locally aggressive tumors. Malignant tumors of the ear canal are best managed by aggressive surgical excision. Radiotherapy may be useful when tumors cannot be completely removed. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208:1413-1418)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association