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  • Author or Editor: G. F. Hoffsis x
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Summary:

Medical records of 83 cattle, which had 1 or more digit amputations performed at Kansas State University and The Ohio State University veterinary hospitals between 1971 and 1990, were reviewed. Signalment, duration of lameness, prior treatment, digit involved, and pathologic condition were evaluated. Owners were contacted with regard to the animal's duration in the herd after amputation and reason for exiting the herd, level of production attained, and degree of lameness. The animal was judged to have a good, fair, or poor recovery on the basis of this information.

Septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint and resulting complications were the problems most frequently treated by digit amputation. Fifty-one percent of cattle undergoing digit amputation attained preamputation production levels for a minimum of 24 months. Approximately 30% of cattle undergoing digit amputation were culled for lameness, usually within 7 months of surgery. Cattle remaining in the herd more than 12 months after amputation were unlikely to be culled for lameness, indicating that long-term breakdown of supporting structures was uncommon. Likelihood of a good recovery decreased from 71.4% in cattle weighing ≤ 341 kg to 27.3% in cattle weighing ≥ 682 kg. Cattle undergoing amputation of a rear medial digit were more likely to recover well than those undergoing amputation of either front digit. The most frequently performed amputation was that of a rear lateral digit, but it was associated with the poorest recovery, possibly because of the disproportionate amount of stress placed on this digit. Cattle used for dairy and beef production had approximately equal chances of a good recovery from digit amputation. Duration of lameness prior to surgery and type of lesion did not influence recovery rates.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

To establish whether Mycobacterium paratuberculosis could be cultured from Dulbecco phosphate-buffered saline solution (dpbss) and to test 3 sampling methods, dpbss supplemented with 2% fetal bovine serum was inoculated with M paratuberculosis at concentrations of 104, 103, 102, 101, and 100 colony-forming units/ml. The inoculated media was sampled after mixing, after centrifugation, and after centrifugation and decontamination with 0.75% hexadecylpyridinium chloride. The samples were inoculated onto 3 slants of Herrolds egg yolk medium supplemented with sodium pyruvate and mycobactin J and 1 slant without mycobactin J. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was isolated following all 3 sampling methods for all concentrations. Treatment with hexadecylpyridinium chloride decreased the number of colonies isolated.

To test the efficacy of a 10-step wash procedure for removing M paratuberculosis from bovine ova, washed zona pellucida intact bovine ova were incubated in dpbss supplemented with 2% fetal bovine serum containing concentrations of 104, 103, 102, 101, and 100 colony-forming units of M paratuberculosis/ml for 12 hours at 22 C. Ten zona pellucida intact ova were removed from each concentration and washed by passing through 10 changes of dpbss supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum. The media from each wash step was inoculated onto slants of Herrolds egg yolk medium. The ova were included with the tenth wash step. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was isolated from 1 of 10 tenth-wash steps at the 104 concentration and 5 of 10 tenth-wash steps at 103.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

A dot elisa was developed for detection of antibodies to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The assay was evaluated by testing sera from cattle that were determined, by bacteriologic culturing of feces, to be infected with M paratuberculosis and were suspected of having clinical disease. Further evaluation involved testing sera from cattle in which M paratuberculosis had not been isolated from feces on several attempts. Results of the dot elisa were positive for sera from 86 of 101 infected cattle, and results were negative for sera from 64 of 64 noninfected cattle. Results of conventional elisa and agar gel immunodiffusion (agid) tests were positive for 79 of 99 and for 51 of 101 infected cattle, respectively.

The dot elisa also was evaluated by comparing results of testing 708 sera with results of bacteriologic culturing of matched fecal samples from 262 cattle in 3 central Ohio dairy herds known to include cattle infected with M paratuberculosis. Results of the dot elisa were positive for 25 of 39 sera from cattle with positive results on culturing of concurrently obtained fecal specimens. The dot elisa results were negative for 661 of 669 sera from cattle with negative results to culturing of concurrently obtained fecal specimens. The 39 sera from cattle with positive results on bacteriologie culturing of matched fecal specimens had positive results for elisa and the agid test 25 and 14 times, respectively. The 669 sera from cattle with concurrently negative results on bacteriologie culturing of feces had negative results to elisa and the agid test 559 and 668 times, respectively.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research