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Abstract

Objective—To determine perceptions of the human-animal bond (HAB) among veterinarians in private practice and evaluate how these veterinarians incorporate the HAB in their practices.

Design—Survey.

Sample Population—1,602 veterinarians in private practice in Washington state.

Procedure—Participants were contacted and asked to complete a survey.

Results—Response rate was 26% (415/1,602). Most respondents agreed that veterinarians will be more successful if they recognize and facilitate the HAB, that facilitating the HAB was important to their practices, that they actively evaluated the degree of bonding between clients and their animals, and that the bonding between a client and his or her animal affected the way they practiced medicine. However, > 50% of respondents did not train veterinary technicians and front office staff members in the HAB or encourage veterinary technicians or front office staff members to learn about the HAB. Fifty-one percent of respondents offered few or no HAB resources to clients. When asked to quantify the importance of 10 nontechnical skills associated with private veterinary practice, respondents ranked communication skills, ethical reasoning, and business management first, second, and third; the HAB was ranked fifth.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that for veterinarians in private practice in Washington state, there is a dichotomy between how important they consider the HAB to be in their practice and the degree to which they facilitate the HAB with regard to communication, training, and client resources. More research on the HAB is necessary to better understand what the HAB encompasses and its implications for private practitioners.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors influencing satisfaction with procedures for small animal euthanasia and to compare the relative importance of those factors among clients, staff, and students at a veterinary teaching hospital.

Design—Survey.

Sample Population—18 nonclinical hospital staff members, 13 clinical staff members, 10 veterinary technicians, 19 veterinary students, and 91 clients.

Procedure—Participants were asked to complete a survey that was designed to assess satisfaction with various aspects of the euthanasia procedure.

Results—Overall response rate was 48% (151/313). Respondents most strongly agreed with the statements that clients should have the option to be present, that having a private place was important, and that employees should be trained to attend to the emotional needs of the client. When asked to place factors in order of importance, those that were ranked the highest included compassionate and caring attitudes of the hospital employees, the option for the client to be present during the euthanasia, and the client being informed and well prepared.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Overall, all groups (nonclinical staff, clinical staff, veterinary technicians, veterinary students, and clients) identified the same factors as being important in the euthanasia of a pet. Results may help facilitate healthy euthanasia experiences. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1774–1779)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Twenty-two horses with ulnar fractures were treated, using tension band wires alone or tension band wires in combination with pins or cortical bone screws. Age of the horses ranged from 2 weeks to 12 years (median, 4 months), and body weight ranged from 68 to 477 kg (median, 181 kg). Fractures were classified according to the Donecker and Bramlage ulnar fracture classification and included type 1-a (4 horses), type 1-b (4), type-2 (6), type-3 (1), type-4 (3), and type-5 (4) fractures. Tension band wires alone were used in 7 horses. Tension band wires were used in conjunction with unthreaded pins in 10 horses. In 3 horses, 5.5-mm cortical bone screws were inserted longitudinally instead of pins. A combination of a 5.5-mm cortical bone screw and a pin was used in 2 horses. In addition to pins and tension band wires, 4.5-mm cortical bone screws were placed in lag fashion to aid reduction of comminuted or oblique fractures in 7 of the 22 horses. Fractures healed in 18 (82%) horses. Four horses were euthanatized because of complications that included catastrophic failure of fixation during recovery from general anesthesia in 1 foal, septic arthritis and hyperextension of the contralateral metacarpophalangeal joint in 1 foal, and wound infection with partial disruption of repair in 2 horses. Nonfatal complications developed in 6 horses and included incision infection, partial wound dehiscence, carpal contraction, carpus varus of the contralateral forelimb, slight distraction of proximal fragments of the fractures, bent implants, and distal migration of pins. Long-term monitoring was performed on 17 horses. Of these 17 horses, 13 (76%) were able to achieve athletic performance activities, 3 had residual lameness restricting athletic performance, and 1 had severely limited activity as a result of lameness. Tension band wires can be used successfully for repair of ulnar fractures in selected horses.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association