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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 5-year-old 4.0-kg (8.8-lb) castrated male domestic shorthair cat was referred because of grade 4/5 left hind limb lameness and swelling in the region of the second metatarsal bone of that limb.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Computed tomography revealed an expansile osteolytic lesion of the second metatarsal bone associated with a periosteal reaction on the third metatarsal bone. There was no evidence of metastases.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Amputation of the second and third metatarsal bones was performed but resulted in medial instability of the remaining metatarsal bones. The instability was treated by placing a loop of 2-0 monofilament, nonabsorbable suture from a screw placed in the distal row of the tarsal bones to a tunnel in the proximal metaphysis of the fourth metatarsal bone. Clinical reevaluation of the cat 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 210 days after surgery and radiographic reevaluation 90 and 210 days after surgery showed complete recovery of the cat. The implants were removed at the time of the 7-month reevaluation. Clinical evaluation 18 months after implant removal showed the treated joint to be stable.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The surgical stabilization technique described here provided medial stability of the tarsometatarsal joint after amputation of the second and third meta-tarsal bones. This method may be an alternative to arthrodesis while maintaining articular function in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:294–299)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify prognostic factors in cats with injection-site sarcomas (ISSs).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—57 cats with ISSs.

Procedures—Medical records of cats were reviewed with regard to sex, age, anatomic site of tumor, tumor size, histologic grade, excision of a primary tumor versus excision of a recurrent ISS, use of excision alone versus excision plus adjuvant therapy, local tumor recurrence, and development of distant metastasis to predict overall survival time (ie, time from tumor excision to death).

Results—In univariate analyses, local recurrence and development of distant metastasis were significantly associated with survival time in cats. On multivariate analysis, development of distant metastasis remained a significant prognostic factor. Histologic grade was associated with distant metastasis, with cats having grade 3 tumors being significantly more likely to develop metastasis than cats with grade 1 and 2 tumors. Factors associated with local recurrence of ISSs were not identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The development of distant metastasis, which may occur later during the course of the disease, was identified as a prognostic factor for overall survival time in cats with ISSs. In addition, cats with histologic grade 3 ISSs should be considered for further interventional studies with chemotherapy to prevent the high rate of distant metastasis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate predictors of survival time in dogs undergoing adrenalectomy and identify risk factors associated with adrenal gland tumor metastasis and vein thrombosis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—52 dogs with primary adrenal gland tumors.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Signalment, tumor features, and information from surgical procedures were evaluated to identify factors predictive of overall survival time, which was defined as the time from surgery until death. The association between metastasis or vein thrombosis and tumor type, size, and site (right or left adrenal gland) was investigated.

Results—On the basis of results of univariate analysis, survival time was significantly shorter for dogs with adenocarcinoma, tumor major axis length ≥ 5 cm, metastasis, and vein thrombosis and when adrenalectomy was combined with an additional abdominal surgical intervention. On multivariate analysis, survival time was significantly shorter for dogs with an adrenal gland tumor with major axis length ≥ 5 cm and for dogs with metastasis or vein thrombosis. Significant associations were found between metastasis and adenocarcinoma and between vein thrombosis and tumors with major axis length ≥ 5 cm.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with an adrenal gland tumor with major axis length ≥ 5 cm, documented metastasis, or vein thrombosis had a poorer prognosis. Metastasis was more frequent in dogs with adenocarcinoma and vein thrombosis when tumors were ≥ 5 cm in length.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine factors predicting survival in dogs with high-grade multicentric lymphoma.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—127 dogs with high-grade multicentric lymphoma evaluated at 4 veterinary hospitals from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—Records were reviewed to identify dogs with completely staged high-grade multicentric lymphoma treated with chemotherapy. Data collected included signalment, history, hematologic findings, tumor characteristics, treatment, and outcome. Long-term survival was defined as surviving > 2 years after diagnosis. Variables were analyzed for associations with dogs living > 2 years.

Results—Among the 127 enrolled dogs, 13 (10%) survived > 2 years with a median survival time of 914 days (range, 740 to 2,058 days). Survival rates at 3, 4, and 5 years were 4%, 3%, and 1 %, respectively. At diagnosis, 11 of the 13 long-term survivors had a body weight ≥ 10 kg, PCV ≥ 35%, absence of ionized hypercalcemia, centroblastic lymphoma, immunophenotype B, absence of bone marrow involvement, and lymphoma stages I through IV and were not previously treated with corticosteroids. The same combination of factors was present in 26 of 114 (23%) dogs surviving ≤ 2 years, yielding a negative predictive value of 97.8% for long-term survivors. Four of the 6 long-term survivors that died during the study died of another cancer; 3 of them had osteosarcoma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Absence of the aforementioned combination of variables at diagnosis may help identify dogs with lymphoma that will not survive > 2 years. Other types of neoplasia, in particular osteosarcoma, may develop in long-term–surviving dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the perioperative characteristics and outcomes of dogs undergoing laparoscopic-assisted splenectomy (LAS).

ANIMALS

136 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Multicentric retrospective study. Medical records of dogs undergoing LAS for treatment of naturally occurring splenic disease from January 1, 2014, to July 31, 2020, were reviewed. History, signalment, physical examination and preoperative diagnostic test results, procedural information, complications, duration of hospitalization, histopathologic diagnosis, and perioperative outcomes were recorded. Perioperative complications were defined using the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group – Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (VCOG-CTCAE v2) guidelines.

RESULTS

LAS was performed for treatment of a splenic mass (124/136 [91%]), immune-mediated disease (7/136 [5%]), splenomegaly (4/136 [3%]), or immune-mediated disease in conjunction with a splenic mass (1/136 [1%]). Median splenic mass size was 1.3 cm3/kg body weight. Conversion to open laparotomy occurred in 5.9% (8/136) of dogs. Complications occurred in 78 dogs, with all being grade 2 or lower. Median surgical time was 47 minutes, and median postoperative hospital stay was 28 hours. All but 1 dog survived to discharge, the exception being postoperative death due to a suspected portal vein thrombus.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In the dogs of this report, LAS was associated with low rates of major complications, morbidity, and mortality when performed for a variety of splenic pathologies. Minimally invasive surgeons can consider the LAS technique to perform total splenectomy in dogs without hemoabdomen and with spleens with modest-sized splenic masses up to 55.2 cm3/kg, with minimal rates of complications, morbidity, and mortality.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association