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  • Author or Editor: F. Robert Weeren x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine history, clinical and electrocardiographic abnormalities, treatment, and outcome of dogs exposed to toxins produced by the Bufo marinus toad.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—94 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs examined between July 1997 and July 1998 for which a diagnosis of toad intoxication had been made on the basis of history and physical examination findings were reviewed.

Results—Most (66) dogs were treated during the spring and summer. For 54 dogs, exposure to toads had been witnessed. For the remaining 40, toad intoxication was diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical signs. The most common clinical signs were neurologic abnormalities, hyperemic mucous membranes, ptyalism, recumbency or collapse, tachypnea, and vomiting. The oral cavity was lavaged with tap water in all dogs. Fifty-two dogs were hospitalized for treatment. Body weight of dogs hospitalized > 2 hours was significantly less than that of dogs treated as outpatients. The most common electrocardiographic findings were sinus arrhythmia, sinus tachycardia, and normal sinus rhythm. Eighty-nine dogs recovered fully, 4 died, and 1 was euthanatized.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In areas in which B marinus toads are endemic, toad intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis for dogs with an acute onset of neurologic abnormalities, hyperemic mucous membranes, and ptyalism, especially during the spring and summer months. The prognosis is good for dogs with toad intoxication that receive appropriate treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1941–1944)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association