Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for

  • Author or Editor: F. A. Mann x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To compare perioperative RBC transfusion among dogs undergoing liver lobectomy, splenectomy, partial gastrectomy, rhinotomy, thyroidectomy, perineal herniorrhaphy, and intrathoracic surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—207 client-owned dogs that underwent various surgeries.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for dogs that had undergone liver lobectomy, splenectomy, partial gastrectomy, rhinotomy, neoplastic thyroidectomy, perineal herniorrhaphy, or intrathoracic surgery. Transfusion requirement (packed RBC, whole blood, and bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier) and survival rate at 2 weeks after surgery were compared among dogs undergoing the various surgeries.

Results—Patients undergoing splenectomy and liver lobectomy were significantly more likely to receive RBC transfusion when each was compared with patients undergoing all other procedures. A significant association was found between body weight and perioperative RBC transfusion, with greater odds of transfusion as body weight increased. Dogs receiving perioperative RBC transfusions were significantly less likely to survive to 2 weeks after surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that dogs undergoing splenectomy and liver lobectomy may require RBC transfusion perioperatively. Veterinarians who perform these procedures should plan accordingly and have packed RBCs or whole blood donors readily available.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare survival rate, duration of hospitalization, and complications in dogs with pancreatic abscesses treated with omentalization with abdominal closure versus open peritoneal drainage and evaluate a pancreatitis severity score for potential prognostic value.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—15 dogs with pancreatic abscesses.

Procedure—Data regarding species, breed, age, initial clinical signs, CBC, serum biochemical abnormalities, pancreatitis severity score, anatomic location of the abscess, intraoperative bacteriologic culture results, treatment modality, postoperative complications, outcome (dismissed alive from the hospital, died in the postoperative period, or euthanized at surgery), and duration of hospitalization were evaluated.

Results—6 dogs survived, 6 dogs died or were euthanized after surgery, and 3 were euthanized during surgery. Five of 8 dogs treated with omentalization and abdominal closure survived, and 1 of 4 dogs treated with open peritoneal drainage survived. In several dogs, treatment required additional surgical procedures, which did not appear to affect outcome. Postoperative complications were similar among survivors and nonsurvivors. Mean duration of hospitalization for dogs treated with omentalization and abdominal closure was less than that of dogs treated with open peritoneal drainage. Neither pancreatitis severity score nor any individual components of the score were associated with outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Omentalization is a viable treatment option for pancreatic abscess in dogs. Furthermore, shorter hospitalization and better survival outcomes may make omentalization preferred over open peritoneal drainage.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine complications and outcomes for dogs that underwent digit amputation.

Design—Retrospective case series and owner survey.

Animals—33 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent digit amputation were evaluated. Signalment, digits amputated, level of amputation, reason for amputation, and complications were recorded. Owners were contacted via mail or telephone to collect follow-up information.

Results—35 digit amputation procedures were performed for the 33 dogs in the study (1 dog underwent 3 procedures). Short-term (≤ 14 days) complications other than lameness were detected in dogs after 13 of 33 (39.4%) procedures for which follow-up information was available; incisional dehiscence was the most common short-term complication. Long-term (>14 days) lameness was detected in dogs after 8 of 32 (25.0%) procedures for which follow-up information was available; lameness was mild or intermittent after 6 of these procedures. Amputation of a digit in a hind limb was the only variable that was significantly associated with the development of short-term complications. Twenty-four of 33 (72.7%) owners responded to the survey via mail or telephone interview; 23 (95.8%) of those owners were satisfied with the procedure. Most dogs had a good functional outcome (including dogs that underwent amputation of digit 3 or 4 or both).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Amputation of a hind limb digit was the only risk factor identified for development of short-term complications. Dogs that underwent amputation of digit 3 or 4 or both did not seem to have a worse outcome than dogs that underwent amputation of other digits.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—6 dogs and a cat were evaluated because of caudal colonic and rectal masses.

Clinical Findings—Tumors were identified in the caudal portion of the colon (n = 2), in the area of the colorectal junction (2), or in the rectum (3).

Treatment and Outcome—In all 7 animals, bilateral pubic and ischial osteotomy was performed to provide exposure of the rectum and associated tumor. Masses were successfully removed, and all 7 animals were able to ambulate normally within 3 days after surgery. No complications associated with the osteotomy procedure were identified.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that bilateral pubic and ischial osteotomy provided sufficient exposure for resection of intrapelvic tumors in dogs and a cat with minimal complications.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare measurements of body temperature obtained with auricular thermometers versus rectal thermometers in dogs with otitis externa.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—100 client-owned dogs: 50 with and 50 without clinical evidence of otitis externa.

Procedure—Dogs were evaluated for the presence of otitis externa on the basis of clinical signs, otoscopic examination, and cytologic evaluation of ear exudate. Auricular and rectal temperatures were obtained simultaneously in all dogs prior to and following ear examination.

Results—There was a high correlation between auricular and rectal temperatures in dogs with otitis externa both prior to and after ear manipulation. Significant differences were not detected in temperature measurements among dogs with different degrees of otitis externa.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Auricular temperature readings obtained by use of an auricular thermometer in dogs with otitis externa are accurate measurements of body temperature, compared with rectal temperature measurements. Temperature measurements are reliable before and after examination of the ear canal. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002; 221:378–380)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether lipid particle coalescence develops in veterinary parenteral nutrition (PN) admixture preparations that are kept at room temperature (23°C) for > 48 hours and whether that coalescence is prevented by admixture filtration, refrigeration, or agitation.

Sample Population—15 bags of veterinary PN solutions.

Procedures—Bags of a PN admixture preparation containing a lipid emulsion were suspended and maintained under different experimental conditions (3 bags/group) for 96 hours while admixtures were dispensed to simulate IV fluid administration (rate, 16 mL/h). Bags were kept static at 4°C (refrigeration); kept at 23°C (room temperature) and continuously agitated; kept at room temperature and agitated for 5 minutes every 4 hours; kept static at room temperature and filtered during delivery; or kept static at room temperature (control conditions). Admixture samples were collected at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and examined via transmission electron microscopy to determine lipid particle diameters. At 96 hours, 2 samples were collected at a location distal to the filter from each bag in that group for bacterial culture.

Results—Distribution of lipid particle size in the control preparations and experimentally treated preparations did not differ significantly. A visible oil layer developed in continuously agitated preparations by 72 hours. Bacterial cultures of filtered samples yielded no growth.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data indicated that the veterinary PN admixtures kept static at 23°C are suitable for use for at least 48 hours. Manipulations of PN admixtures appear unnecessary to prolong lipid particle stability, and continuous agitation may hasten lipid breakdown.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the leak pressure and amount of time required to perform closure for 2 double-layer esophagotomy closure techniques.

SAMPLE 28 intrathoracic esophageal segments harvested from 38 porcine cadavers.

PROCEDURES Longitudinal 3-cm esophagotomy incisions made in porcine cadaveric esophagi were closed with 2 double-layer closure techniques. Fifteen incisions were closed with a simple interrupted pattern, and 13 incisions were closed with a simple continuous pattern. Leak pressure, bursting wall tension, and closure time were compared between suture patterns by use of a t test or Mann-Whitney rank sum test.

RESULTS Median leak pressures differed significantly between segments closed with the simple interrupted pattern (16.0 mm Hg; range, 5.4 to 54.9 mm Hg) and the simple continuous pattern (38.7 mm Hg; range, 11.3 to 81.9 mm Hg). Median bursting wall tension differed significantly between the simple interrupted pattern (0.63 × 105 dynes/cm; range, 0.16 × 105 dynes/cm to 2.89 × 105 dynes/cm) and the simple continuous pattern (1.79 × 105 dynes/cm; range, 0.44 × 105 dynes/cm to 4.70 × 105 dynes/cm). Mean ± SD closure time differed significantly between the simple interrupted pattern (19.2 ± 2.0 minutes) and the simple continuous pattern (14.7 ± 1.5 minutes).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In the study reported here, double-layer simple continuous closure resulted in a higher median postoperative leak pressure and higher median postoperative bursting wall tension and could be performed more rapidly than the double-layer simple interrupted closure on these porcine cadaveric specimens.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether stored (cooled or frozen-thawed) jejunal segments can be used to obtain dependable leak pressure data after enterotomy closure.

SAMPLE 36 jejunal segments from 3 juvenile pigs.

PROCEDURES Jejunal segments were harvested from euthanized pigs and assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (n = 12 segments/group) as follows: fresh (used within 4 hours after collection), cooled (stored overnight at 5°C before use), and frozen-thawed (frozen at −12°C for 8 days and thawed at room temperature [23°C] for 1 hour before use). Jejunal segments were suspended and 2-cm enterotomy incisions were made on the antimesenteric border. Enterotomies were closed with a simple continuous suture pattern. Lactated Ringer solution was infused into each segment until failure at the suture line was detected. Leak pressure was measured by use of a digital transducer.

RESULTS Mean ± SD leak pressure for fresh, cooled, and frozen-thawed segments was 68.3 ± 23.7 mm Hg, 55.3 ± 28.1 mm Hg, and 14.4 ± 14.8 mm Hg, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in mean leak pressure among pigs, but a significant difference in mean leak pressure was detected among treatment groups. Mean leak pressure was significantly lower for frozen-thawed segments than for fresh or cooled segments, but mean leak pressure did not differ significantly between fresh and cooled segments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Fresh porcine jejunal segments or segments cooled overnight may be used for determining intestinal leak pressure, but frozen-thawed segments should not be used.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the amount of air leakage into the thoracic cavity associated with each of 4 thoracostomy tube placement techniques in canine cadavers.

Sample Population—28 canine cadavers.

Procedures—Thoracostomy tube placement techniques (7 cadavers/technique) included subcutaneous tunneling with a silicone tube by use of Carmalt forceps or with a polyvinyl chloride tube by use of a trocar (SC-CARM and SC-TRO, respectively) and tunneling under the latissimus dorsi muscle with similar tube-instrument techniques (LD-CARM and LD-TRO, respectively). Differences in intrapleural pressures (IPPs) measured before and after tube placement and before and after tube removal were calculated; duration of air leakage around the tubes was assessed by use of a 3-chamber thoracic drainage system.

Results—Tunneling method and depth had no interaction effect on the difference in IPP measured before and after tube placement; the IPP difference for both forceps technique groups was significantly greater than findings for both trocar technique groups. Tunneling method and depth had an interaction effect on the difference in IPP measured before and after tube removal; compared with SC-TRO and LD-CARM group differences, the SC-CARM group difference was significantly greater, but the LD-TRO group difference was similar. More intermittent air leakage was associated with the 2 forceps techniques than with the 2 trocar techniques.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Trocar-implemented thoracostomy tube placement in canine cadavers resulted in less air leakage than the forceps method. Air leakage upon tube removal was less pronounced for the LD-CARM technique than the SC-CARM technique. The LD-TRO technique is recommended to prevent iatrogenic pneumothorax in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the time and number of laser beam passes required to make full-thickness skin incisions and extent of laser-induced tissue artifacts following use of a CO2 laser at various settings.

SAMPLE

24 skin specimens from six 5-month-old porcine carcasses.

PROCEDURES

4 full-thickness skin specimens were harvested from the flank regions of each carcass within 30 minutes after euthanasia and randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. Three 5-cm-long incisions were made in each specimen with a CO2 laser (beam diameter, 0.4 mm) set to deliver a continuous wave of energy alone (groups 1 and 2) or in superpulse mode (groups 3 and 4) at 10 (groups 1 and 3) or 20 (groups 2 and 4) W of power. The time and number of passes required to achieve a full-thickness incision were recorded, and extent of laser-induced tissue artifact (as determined by histologic evaluation) was compared among the 4 groups.

RESULTS

Mean time required to make a full-thickness skin incision for groups 2 and 4 (power, 20 W) was significantly less than that for groups 1 and 3 (power, 10 W). Mean number of passes was lowest for group 2 (continuous wave at 20 W). Extent of laser-induced tissue artifact was greatest for group 4 (superpulse mode at 20 W).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results provided preliminary information regarding use of CO2 lasers to make skin incisions in veterinary patients. In vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the effect of various CO2 laser settings on tissue healing and patient outcome.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research