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  • Author or Editor: Evelyn M. Galban x
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A 2-year-old 34-kg (74.8-lb) spayed female Golden Retriever was examined 3 months after the onset of progressive left facial involuntary muscle contractions. Initially, the muscular spasms affected the left periocular muscles and subsequently spread to include the left portion of the upper lip. One week prior to examination, the owner noticed that the dog would drop treats out of the left side of its mouth; however, the owner was unable to confirm that abnormalities were present when the dog was drinking water or eating food from its bowl. The muscle spasms only occurred when the dog was heavily sniffing or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 4-year-old 6.2-kg (13.6-lb) castrated male terrier-Poodle mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of a 6-month history of bruxism (initially occurring only during stressful events, but progressively worsening), falling, stumbling, bumping into walls and objects, head tremors, pecking motions, behavior changes, urinating and defecating in the house, and not sleeping at night (restlessness and barking). Prior to the referral evaluation, a CBC and serum biochemical profile revealed no abnormalities; an oral cavity examination performed when the dog was sedated did not identify the cause of the bruxism. The dog had been treated with gabapentin (8 mg/kg [3.6 mg/lb], PO, 2 hours

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of ischemic stroke in Greyhounds and determine whether affected dogs had coagulation abnormalities and hypertension.

Design—Multi-institutional, retrospective study.

Animals—21 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records (including diagnostic testing results) and MRI images of the brain were reviewed for Greyhounds with ischemic stroke that had been evaluated at 4 institutions. The proportion of Greyhounds with ischemic stroke was compared with the proportion of non-Greyhound dogs with ischemic stroke. Demographic information for dogs evaluated at each institution was obtained to determine the proportion of Greyhounds in the hospital populations.

Results—21 Greyhounds with ischemic stroke were identified. Abnormalities in coagulation were not identified in the 14 Greyhounds that underwent such testing. Systemic hypertension was identified in 6 of 14 Greyhounds that underwent such testing. No other abnormalities were identified by means of other routine diagnostic tests for Greyhounds. For all institutions combined, the prevalence of ischemic stroke in Greyhounds was 0.66% (21/3,161 Greyhounds). Greyhounds were significantly more likely to be evaluated because of ischemic stroke, compared with all other dog breeds combined (OR, 6.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.2 to 10.2).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that Greyhounds were predisposed to ischemic stroke, compared with all other breeds combined. Coagulation abnormalities did not seem to contribute to ischemic stroke. Hypertension may have contributed to the development of ischemic stroke. Greyhounds with ischemic stroke should undergo measurement of systolic arterial blood pressure. Antihypertensive treatments may be warranted for such dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association