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  • Author or Editor: Esther Hope x
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SUMMARY

The effects of dexamethasone (0.2 mg/kg of body weight; iv, im, and po) and methylprednisolone acetate (120 mg, given intra-articularly) on serum osteocalcin and cortisol concentrations were studied in 6 horses. Serum osteocalcin and cortisol concentrations were serially monitored after each treatment. A significant (P < 0.05) decrease in serum osteocalcin and cortisol concentrations was observed from 12 to 24 and 2 to 48 hours, respectively, after iv and im administrations of dexamethasone. Serum osteocalcin and cortisol concentrations were significantly decreased from 6 to 48 and 3 to 72 hours, respectively, after oral administration. In contrast, a change in serum osteocalcin concentration was not detected after intra-articular administration of methylprednisolone. Oral, iv, or im treatment with 0.2 mg of dexamethasone/kg caused a decrease in serum osteocalcin concentration in horses.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

A commercially available radioimmunoassay kit for measurement of human osteocalcin was validated for use in horses. For accurate measurement of equine serum osteocalcin, blood samples may be collected at a temperature between 20 and 25 C, then centrifuged within 90 minutes; serum may be stored at —20 C in plastic tubes for up to 26 weeks. Serum may be thawed and refrozen up to 5 times without significant change in measured equine serum osteocalcin concentration. Assay sensitivity was 0.16 ng/ml. Recovery of bovine osteocalcin standard added to equine serum was linear. Intra-assay coefficient of variation (X 100) for 2 equine serum pools was 6.9 (mean ± SD, 13.9 ± 1.0 ng/ml) and 7.5 (10.6 ± 0.8 ng/ml) %. Interassay coefficient of variation for 3 equine serum pools measured in 12 assays was 12.5 (16.1 ± 2.0 ng/ml), 12.7 (11.5 ± 1.5 ng/ml), and 24.6 (3.0 ± 0.7 ng/ml) %. Dilutional parallelism was documented by assaying pooled equine serum at 4 dilutions and correcting the mean result for dilution. Significant change was not observed in equine serum osteocalcin concentration for various time-of-day blood sample collections in horses housed under continuous lighting.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Fever, limb edema, and laminitis were observed in horses 18 to 36 hours after they consumed hoary alyssum (Berteroa incana) under field and experimental conditions. Clinical signs were not observed in all horses that had ingested the plant. Diagnosis in the field cases was limited to observation of clinical signs and evidence of plant ingestion in hay or on pasture. In most cases, clinical remission was observed 2 to 4 days after empirical treatment, removal of the plant source, or both.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association