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  • Author or Editor: Erin K. O’Neil x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if equine cadavers modified with joint distension would yield higher fluid volumes, require fewer needle redirects, and improve student self-efficacy.

SAMPLE

19 third-year veterinary students.

METHODS

Voluntary participation was sought during 4 sessions of an equine arthrocentesis and diagnostic analgesia laboratory. Half of the sessions were provided with unmodified cadavers and half were provided with cadavers modified with joint distention. Prior to and after the laboratory, participating students completed surveys regarding their self-efficacy with arthrocentesis of the metacarpophalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. During the study, the number of needle redirects and the volume of fluid obtained was recorded.

RESULTS

Increased fluid volumes were obtained from the modified metacarpophalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. No difference was identified in number of needle redirects between cadaver types for either joint. Self-efficacy scores increased at the end of the laboratory for arthrocentesis of the metacarpophalangeal joint in both modified and unmodified groups. Self-efficacy scores increased at the end of the laboratory for arthrocentesis of the distal interphalangeal joint for the modified but not unmodified groups.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Modified equine cadavers provided a higher fluid yield following arthrocentesis compared to unmodified cadavers, but despite this, multiple attempts were required for proper needle placement. Performing equine arthrocentesis improved student self-efficacy with the task. Given our results, the model used for introduction to performing equine arthrocentesis may be less important than practice with the skill. In order to improve proficiency and self-efficacy, equine arthrocentesis should be provided multiple times throughout the veterinary curriculum.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate potential equine clients’ perceptions of equine veterinarians based on attire.

SAMPLE

763 horse owners/lessees.

METHODS

Participants were invited to complete a survey shared mainly via equestrian social media pages between August and October 2022. 1–3 Survey participants were shown pictures of a male veterinarian and a female veterinarian in 7 outfits ranging from casual to business attire and were asked to score the veterinarian on 7 traits: easygoing attitude, friendliness, compassion, trustworthiness, professionalism, competence, and cost of services. The survey asked which of the traits were most valued in an equine veterinarian, as well as whether various aspects of appearance including tattoos, piercings, and hair dyed a nonorganic color were acceptable for equine veterinarians.

RESULTS

Of the 2,655 individuals who opened the survey, 763 responses were included. Respondents were predominantly female (743/763 [97.4%]) from rural areas (493/763 [64.6%]). Only 37.1% (283/763) of respondents agreed that what a veterinarian wears influences their confidence in them. The highest-ranked traits in an equine veterinarian were knowledge/competency (mean ± SD, 1.46 ± 0.98), followed by trustworthiness (2.34 ± 1.08) and compassion (3.50 ± 1.20), with coveralls and scrubs being the preferred attire clients associated with these attributes (with the exception of compassion, for which polo shirt/jeans was the preferred attire). T-shirt/jeans was consistently ranked lowest by respondents in association with these attributes, except in the area of compassion, where polo shirt/black pants was ranked lowest.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Our findings suggested the attire and appearance of equine veterinarians can impact client perceptions, with veterinarians wearing scrubs and coveralls associated with higher competency and trustworthiness.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association