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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Authors Erin Frey and Megan Jacob

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify a method for developing antibiograms for use in companion animal private practices (PPs).

SAMPLES

Reports (n = 532) of aerobic bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed between January 1, 2018, and December 31, 2018, at 11 PPs and 1 academic primary care practice (APCP).

PROCEDURES

Data extracted from reports included patient identification number, laboratory accession number, patient signalment, collection method, body site, and results of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A custom antibiogram was then constructed with the help of commonly available software by adapting methods used by human hospitals. Susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated by PPs and the APCP were compared to identify challenges associated with collating data from multiple laboratories.

RESULTS

4 bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius) and 3 bacterial groups (Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus spp, and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp) met the minimum requirement of ≥ 15 isolates for construction of an antibiogram. For urine samples, 3 bacterial species and 2 bacterial groups met the minimum requirement of ≥ 10 isolates. For samples from skin, 2 bacterial species and 2 bacterial groups met the minimum requirement of ≥ 10 isolates. Patient signalment, sample source, and distribution of bacterial isolates were similar between PP and APCP patients.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results demonstrated that it was feasible to adapt existing guidelines for developing antibiograms in human medicine to the veterinary outpatient setting. Use of antibiograms could aid in empirical antimicrobial drug selection in a manner that supports antimicrobial stewardship principles.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Recent state and federal legislative actions and current recommendations from the World Health Organization seem to suggest that, when it comes to antimicrobial stewardship, use of antimicrobials for prevention, control, or treatment of disease can be ranked in order of appropriateness, which in turn has led, in some instances, to attempts to limit or specifically oppose the routine use of medically important antimicrobials for prevention of disease. In contrast, the AVMA Committee on Antimicrobials believes that attempts to evaluate the degree of antimicrobial stewardship on the basis of therapeutic intent are misguided and that use of antimicrobials for prevention, control, or treatment of disease may comply with the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. It is important that veterinarians and animal caretakers are clear about the reason they may be administering antimicrobials to animals in their care. Concise definitions of prevention, control, and treatment of individuals and populations are necessary to avoid confusion and to help veterinarians clearly communicate their intentions when prescribing or recommending antimicrobial use.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association