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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare electroretinographic (ERG) responses obtained in dogs before and after oral administration of gabapentin, trazodone, and a combination of both medications.

ANIMALS

12 clinically normal dogs.

PROCEDURES

A short-protocol ERG with 20 minutes of dark adaption was recorded for all dogs to establish baseline ERG responses. Dogs then received gabapentin (approx 30 mg/kg), trazadone (approx 20 mg/kg or approx 5 mg/kg), or a combination of gabapentin (approx 20 mg/kg) and trazodone (approx 5 mg/kg) orally, and the same ERG protocol was repeated 2 hours later. Dogs were given a washout period of at least 1 week between treatments.

RESULTS

a-Wave amplitudes were significantly (P = 0.018) decreased after administration of the combination of gabapentin and trazodone. b-Wave amplitudes were significantly decreased after administration of the 20-mg/kg dose of trazodone (P = 0.006) and after administration of the combination of gabapentin and trazodone (P = 0.002). Heavier dogs that received higher total doses of trazodone had decreases in a-wave amplitude after administration of the 20-mg/kg dose of trazodone and in b-wave amplitude after administration of the 5-mg/kg dose of trazodone.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

High doses of trazodone and the combination of gabapentin and trazodone significantly decreased a-wave and b-wave amplitudes in clinically normal dogs. However, the effects on retinal responses had little clinical importance. Therefore, these medications can be used safely in a clinical setting; however, further studies are needed in dogs with retinal disease.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of grape seed extract (GSE), lutein, and fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids on oxidative stress, migration, proliferation, and viability of lens epithelial cells (LECs).

SAMPLE Lens capsules or cultured LECs obtained from canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES An antioxidant reductive capacity assay was used to determine reducing capability of each substance. The LECs were cultured and incubated with various substances, including N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), when appropriate, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as positive and vehicle control substances, respectively. A dichlorofluorescein assay was used to evaluate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to determine cell viability. Ex vivo posterior capsule opacification (PCO) was used to evaluate LEC migration and proliferation.

RESULTS Antioxidant reductive effects of GSE surpassed those of NAC, lutein, and fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids. The GSE reduced ROS production in LECs, compared with the DMSO vehicle control, whereas lutein was pro-oxidative. All test substances reduced cell viability. Ex vivo PCO was not altered by GSE, was decreased by lutein, and was increased by fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids, compared with results for the DMSO vehicle control.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Only GSE had significant antioxidant capabilities and reduced ROS production; however, no effect on ex vivo PCO was detected. Fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids increased ex vivo PCO. No conclusions could be made regarding antioxidant effects of these substances on LECs. These findings suggested that the substances will not decrease PCO.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the outcome in dogs diagnosed with congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (EHPSS) at ≥ 5 years of age treated with medical management only (M) or with surgical attenuation (S). The hypothesis was that dogs undergoing surgical attenuation would have a longer survival time than dogs undergoing medical management only.

ANIMALS

351 dogs definitively diagnosed with EHPSS at ≥ 5 years of age.

PROCEDURES

Medical records from 2009 to 2019 at 16 veterinary teaching hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, clinical signs at diagnosis, clinicopathologic data, surgical and medical treatments, shunt morphology, clinical signs and medical treatments at 6 to 12 months after diagnosis, and survival time.

RESULTS

351 dogs (M, 119 [33.9%]; S, 232 [66.1%]) were included in the study. Survival time was longer with surgery than medical management (hazard ratio, 4.2; M, 3.4 years; S, 10.9 years). Continued clinical signs at 6 to 12 months after diagnosis were more common with medical management (M, 40% [33/88]; S, 14% [21/155]). Continued medical treatments at 6 to 12 months after diagnosis were more common in the medical management group (M, 78% [69/88]; S, 34% [53/155]). Perioperative mortality rate was 7.3%.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dogs diagnosed at ≥ 5 years of age with EHPSS have significantly better survival times and fewer clinical signs with surgical attenuation, compared with medical management. Older dogs have similar surgical mortality rates to dogs of all ages after surgical EHPSS attenuation.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association