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  • Author or Editor: Enrico Bottero x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine results of cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates and impression smears of gastrointestinal tract tumors in dogs and cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—38 dogs and 44 cats with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal tract tumors.

Procedures—Results of cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates (n = 67) or impression smears (31) were compared with the histologic diagnosis, and extent of agreement was classified as complete, partial, none, or undetermined.

Results—For 48 of the 67 (72%) fine-needle aspirates, there was complete or partial agreement between the cytologic and histologic diagnoses. For 12 (18%) aspirates, the extent of agreement could not be determined because the cytologic specimen was considered unsatisfactory. For 29 of the 31 (94%) impression smears, there was complete agreement between the cytologic and histologic diagnoses, and for 2 (6%), there was partial agreement. None of the impression smears were considered unsatisfactory. Proportion of samples with complete agreement and proportion of samples with complete or partial agreement were significantly higher for impression smears than for fine-needle aspirates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that there was moderate agreement between results of cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates from dogs and cats with gastrointestinal tract neoplasia and the definitive histologic diagnosis. The agreement between results of cytologic examination of impression smears and the histologic diagnosis appeared to be higher.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively evaluate the clinical and prognostic importance of duodenal endoscopic and histologic findings, including duodenal mucosal counts of forkhead box P3-positive regulatory T cells (Foxp3+ Tregs), in dogs with immunosuppressant-responsive enteropathy (IRE).

ANIMALS

57 client-owned dogs with IRE.

PROCEDURES

The canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI) was used to assess each dog when IRE was diagnosed (T0) and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months later. Dogs were grouped on the basis of clinical response (responder group vs nonresponder group) and 12-month long-term outcome (responded to treatment and did not relapse [good outcome group] vs did not respond to treatment or had relapsed [bad outcome group]). At T0, dogs underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy and endoscopic biopsy, with results for variables of duodenal endoscopic and histologic evaluations scored and compared across groups.

RESULTS

At T0, the overall median CCECAI score was 7; CCECAI score was not associated with clinical response or relapse. Dogs had significantly greater odds of being in the bad outcome group (vs the good outcome group) if they had a histologic score of 3 (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.09 to 11.3). No differences in the counts of Foxp3+ Tregs were detected between groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In dogs with IRE, results indicated that evaluation of Foxp3+ Tregs did not have prognostic value, whereas a duodenal histologic score of 3 could be a negative prognostic factor for response and relapse, and higher severity scores for intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes and plasma cells in duodenal biopsy samples may be negatively associated with response.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the association between a diagnosis of eosinophilic lung disease (ELD) in dogs with signalment and bronchoscopic features and evaluate the accuracy of visualization of nodules for the diagnosis of ELD.

ANIMALS

781 dogs with cough that underwent bronchoscopy between 2014 and 2016.

PROCEDURES

Data were extracted from the medical records of each included dog. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate associations between ELD and patient characteristics.

RESULTS

ELD was diagnosed in 113 (14.5%) dogs. More than 3 nodular lesions of the bronchial mucosa were detected in 64 (8.2%) dogs. The odds of having ELD were greater in dogs with nodules (adjusted OR [aOR], 26.0; 95% CI, 13.0 to 52.0) and static bronchial collapse (aOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.6), and lower in dogs having focal versus diffuse inflammation (aOR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.37). The odds of having ELD decreased for each 1-year increase in age (aOR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.92), and increased for each 1-kg increase in weight (aOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.06). Visualization of nodules during bronchoscopy had a overall accuracy of 89.4% (95% CI, 87.0% to 91.4%), sensitivity of 41.6% (32.4% to 51.2%), and specificity of 97.5% (96.0% to 98.5%) for a diagnosis of ELD.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

On the basis of high specificity and negative predictive value, lack of visualization of bronchial nodules during bronchoscopy can be used to preliminarily rule out ELD. However, visualization of bronchial nodules does not imply presence of ELD. This could be especially relevant when results of BAL cytology are available several days after the actual bronchoscopy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association