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  • Author or Editor: Emily D. Conway x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate species differences and effects of storage duration and temperature on the anticollagenase efficacy of canine, feline, and equine serum on in vitro corneal degradation.

SAMPLES Corneas and serum from dogs, cats, and horses.

PROCEDURES Clinically normal corneas from dogs, cats, and horses were harvested within 2 hours after euthanasia. Serum samples from dogs, cats, and horses were collected and pooled by species. Corneal specimens were incubated with collagenase derived from Clostridium histolyticum, 5mM calcium chloride in saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, and feline, canine, or equine serum that had been stored for 0, 30, 90, or 180 days at −20° or −80°C. Following incubation, the corneal weight loss percentage and hydroxyproline concentration in the incubation fluid were calculated and compared among experimental combinations.

RESULTS Feline serum was more effective than canine or equine serum for minimizing corneal weight loss. Incubation with feline or equine, but not canine, serum significantly reduced hydroxyproline production. Serum storage duration did not affect corneal weight loss, but the hydroxyproline concentration was greater for corneal specimens that were incubated with serum that was stored for 90 days, compared with that for corneal specimens incubated with serum that was stored for 0, 30, or 180 days. Serum storage temperature did not affect corneal weight loss or hydroxyproline concentration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that serum reduced corneal degradation in vitro, and the duration and temperature at which serum was stored did not affect its anticollagenase efficacy.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the anticollagenase efficacy of fresh feline, canine, and equine serum and plasma on in vitro corneal degradation.

SAMPLE Grossly normal corneas from recently euthanized dogs, cats, and horses and fresh serum and plasma from healthy dogs, cats, and horses.

PROCEDURES Serum and plasma were pooled by species and used for in vitro experiments. Corneas were collected and stored at −80°C. Sections of cornea were dried, weighed, and incubated in saline (0.9% NaCl) solution with clostridial collagenase and homologous fresh serum or plasma. Corneal degradation was assessed as the percentage of corneal weight loss and hydroxyproline concentration, compared with results for positive and negative control samples.

RESULTS Homologous fresh serum and plasma significantly reduced the percentage of corneal weight loss, compared with results for positive control samples. No significant difference was found in percentage of corneal weight loss between incubation with serum or plasma for feline, canine, and equine corneas. Canine serum and plasma significantly reduced hydroxyproline concentrations, whereas inclusion of feline and equine serum or plasma did not, compared with results for positive control samples. Hydroxyproline concentrations were moderately correlated with percentage of corneal weight loss for feline samples and weakly correlated for equine samples, but they were not correlated for canine samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, the anticollagenase efficacy of fresh feline, canine, and equine serum was not different from that of plasma. Plasma should be an acceptable substitute for serum in the topical treatment of keratomalacia.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research