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  • Author or Editor: Emanuela Morello x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the most effective hemostatic knot configuration performed by veterinary students following a brief training session with an experienced surgeon and a subsequent deliberate self-training period.

DESIGN Experiment.

SAMPLE 24 fourth-year veterinary students with no previous surgical knot–tying experience.

PROCEDURES In a 1-hour training session, an experienced surgeon showed veterinary students how to perform 5 hemostatic knot configurations (giant, slip, strangle, surgeon's, and transfixing), which they then practiced at home on a hemostasis simulator for 2 weeks. Thereafter, students performed each knot 4 times (twice each with monofilament and multifilament suture) on a hemostasis simulator. An experienced surgeon evaluated the correct execution of knots and measured their effectiveness by use of a manometer to measure vessel pressure distal to the ligature. Each student completed a questionnaire regarding their perceived learning and execution difficulty and sealing security for each knot. Responses were compared among knots and suture materials.

RESULTS Overall, students considered the surgeon's knot the easiest to learn and the strangle knot the most difficult. The slipknot was also considered the easiest knot to perform, and the giant knot was considered the most difficult. The strangle knot was deemed the most effective in reducing vessel pressure distal to the ligature.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The strangle knot was the most effective hemostatic knot in inexperienced hands, although veterinary students considered it more difficult to learn than other, perhaps more commonly taught, knots. Therefore, teaching of the strangle knot should be encouraged in veterinary schools.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine an optimal time interval between amputation and initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy (TIamp-chemo) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases and whether TIamp-chemo was associated with outcome.

ANIMALS

168 client-owned dogs treated at 9 veterinary oncology centers.

PROCEDURES

Data were collected from the dogs’ medical records concerning potential prognostic variables and outcomes. Dogs were grouped as to whether they received chemotherapy within 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, or > 30 days after amputation of the affected limb. Analyses were performed to identify variables associated with time to tumor progression and survival time after limb amputation and to determine an optimal TIamp-chemo.

RESULTS

Median TIamp-chemo was 14 days (range, 1 to 210 days). Median time to tumor progression for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (375 days; 95% CI, 162 to 588 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (202 days; 95% CI, 146 to 257 days). Median overall survival time for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (445 days; 95% CI, 345 to 545 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (239 days; 95% CI, 186 to 291 days).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that early (within 5 days) initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy after limb amputation was associated with a significant and clinically relevant survival benefit for dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases. These results suggested that the timing of chemotherapy may be an important prognostic variable.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association