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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate potential risk factors for development of primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in Bouviers des Flandres.

DESIGN Prospective, observational study.

ANIMALS 98 Bouviers des Flandres.

PROCEDURES All dogs underwent slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, gonioscopy, applanation tonometry, streak retinoscopy, and A-scan, B-scan, and high-resolution ultrasonography. Iridocorneal angles and degree of pectinate ligament dysplasia sheeting were graded, and an angle index was mathematically derived for each eye on the basis of these values. Ciliary clefts evaluated by high-resolution ultrasonography were classified as open, narrow, or closed. Owners were contacted by telephone 7 to 9 years after the initial examination to determine whether dogs had a subsequent diagnosis of PACG. Relationships between previously recorded variables and the development of PACG were evaluated by logistic regression methods. Available pedigrees were reviewed to assess genetic relationships among affected dogs.

RESULTS 9 of 92 (9.8%) dogs with follow-up information available developed PACG. An angle index < 1 and presence of a narrow or closed ciliary cleft in 1 or both eyes were each significantly associated with development of PACG. Odds of developing PACG for dogs with an angle index < 1 (indicating marked reduction in outflow capacity through the iridocorneal angle), a narrow or closed ciliary cleft in > 1 eye, or both findings were 13, 20, and 28 times those for dogs that did not have these findings, respectively. All dogs that developed PACG shared 1 common male sire or grandsire.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Several anatomic factors were significant risk factors for development of PACG in this population of dogs. Results also suggested a genetic component for the disease.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for measurements of anterior segment structures in canine eyes.

Animals—4 clinically normal Beagles.

Procedure—Images were obtained from 8 eyes with a handheld 20-MHz transducer. Eleven anterior segment structures on each image were measured 5 times by 2 independent observers. Coefficients of variation (CVs) for measurements were used to assess intraobserver reliability. Interobserver reliability was assessed by comparing measurements obtained by the 2 observers from the same images. Five images were sequentially obtained from 2 locations (ie, superior and temporal) to evaluate image reproducibility. Anterior segment structures were measured once on each image; image reproducibility was assessed by use of the CV for each parameter measured. Imaging location was assessed by comparison of CV for measurements from each location.

Results—CVs were < 10% for observer A for all measurements except the ciliary cleft area (11.63%). The CVs were > 10% for observer B for measurements of the angle recess area (18.51%) and ciliary cleft width (17.44%) and area (16.01%). Significant differences in measurements between observers were found for 5 of 11 anterior segment structures. Imaging the superior aspect of the globe provided the most reproducible images, although image reproducibility was still somewhat variable, with the highest and lowest CVs for measurements of 33.01% and 11.32%, respectively, in the superior position.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—High-resolution ultrasound images can be used to reliably measure various anterior segment structures. Clinically relevant findings in the anterior segment of canine eyes may be detectable by use of HRUS. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1775–1779)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare analgesia provided by carprofen and tramadol in dogs after enucleation.

Design—Randomized, masked clinical trial.

Animals—43 dogs.

Procedures—Client-owned dogs admitted for routine enucleation were randomly assigned to receive either carprofen or tramadol orally 2 hours prior to surgery and 12 hours after the first dose. Dogs were scored for signs of pain at baseline (ie, before carprofen or tramadol administration) and at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 30 hours after extubation. Dogs received identical premedication and inhalation anesthesia regimens, including premedication with hydromorphone. If the total pain score was ≥ 9 (maximum possible score of 20), there was a score ≥ 3 in any of 5 behavioral categories (highest score possible per category was 3 or 4), or the visual analog scale (VAS) score was ≥ 35 (maximum possible score of 100) combined with a palpation score > 0, rescue analgesia (hydromorphone) was administered and treatment failure was recorded.

Results—No differences were found in age, sex, or baseline pain scores between groups. Significantly more dogs receiving tramadol required rescue analgesia (6/21), compared with dogs receiving carprofen (1/22). Pain and VAS scores decreased linearly over time. No significant differences were found in pain or VAS scores between groups at any time point (dogs were excluded from analysis after rescue).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that carprofen, with opioid premedication, may provide more effective postoperative analgesia than tramadol in dogs undergoing enucleation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the efficacy of a retrobulbar bupivacaine nerve block for postoperative analgesia following eye enucleation in dogs.

Design—Randomized controlled trial.

Animals—22 dogs.

Procedures—Client-owned dogs admitted to the hospital for routine eye enucleation were enrolled with owner consent and randomly assigned to a treatment (bupivacaine hydrochloride) or control (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) group. Baseline subjective pain scores were recorded. Anesthesia consisted of hydromorphone and midazolam preoperatively, thiopental or propofol for induction, and isoflurane in oxygen for maintenance. An inferior-temporal palpebral retrobulbar injection of either saline solution or bupivacaine was administered. Transpalpebral eye enucleation was performed. Pain scores were recorded at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours after extubation (time 0) by observers masked to treatment groups. Dogs were given hydromorphone (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb], IM or IV) as a rescue analgesic if the subjective pain score totaled ≥ 9 (out of a maximum total score of 18) or ≥ 3 in any 1 category.

Results—9 of 11 control dogs required a rescue dose of hydromorphone, but only 2 of 11 dogs in the bupivacaine treatment group required rescue analgesia. Mean time to treatment failure (ie, administration of rescue analgesia following extubation) was 0.56 hours (95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 1.095 hours) for the 11 dogs that received hydromorphone.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Retrobulbar administration of bupivacaine in dogs in conjunction with traditional premedication prior to eye enucleation was an effective form of adjunctive analgesia and reduced the need for additional postoperative analgesics.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize ocular findings in hypertensive dogs, determine prevalence of hypertension in dogs with ocular disease suggestive of hypertension, and examine possible relationships between degree of hypertension and ocular disease.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—65 dogs initially referred for blood pressure measurement (n = 22), ophthalmic examination (25), or both (18).

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs examined at the teaching hospital that underwent a complete ophthalmic examination and blood pressure measurement within a 24-hour period between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007. Signalment, history, blood pressure measurements, ophthalmic examination findings, and any vasoactive drug treatments were recorded. Ocular lesions considered likely to be associated with systemic hypertension included retinal hemorrhage, retinal detachment, hyphema, tortuous vessels, and subretinal edema.

Results—Of the 65 dogs, 42 were hypertensive (systolic blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg) and 23 were normotensive. Sixty-two percent (26/42) of hypertensive dogs had ≥ 1 type of ocular lesion identified. Retinal hemorrhage was the most common ocular lesion in hypertensive dogs (17/42 [40%]). The presence of ≥ 1 type of ocular lesion had moderate sensitivity and specificity of 62% and 61 %, respectively, for identification of hypertension. Fifteen of the 25 (60%) dogs referred for blood pressure measurement after initial ophthalmic examination were found to be hypertensive.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ocular lesions are common in dogs with systemic hypertension. Dogs with hypertension or diseases associated with hypertension should be monitored carefully for evidence of ocular target organ damage, and hypertension should be systematically ruled out in dogs with characteristic ocular lesions.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the refractive state of eyes in various breeds of dogs to identify breeds susceptible to ametropias.

Animals—1,440 dogs representing 90 breeds.

Procedures—In each dog, 1 drop of 1% cyclopentolate or 1% tropicamide was applied to each eye, and a Canine Eye Registration Foundation examination was performed. Approximately 30 minutes after drops were administered, the refractive state of each eye was assessed via streak retinoscopy. Dogs were considered ametropic (myopic or hyperopic) when the mean refractive state (the resting focus of the eye at rest relative to visual infinity) exceeded ± 0.5 diopter (D). Anisometropia was diagnosed when the refractive error of each eye in a pair differed by > 1 D.

Results—Mean ± SD refractive state of all eyes examined was −0.05 ± 1.36 D (emmetropia). Breeds in which the mean refractive state was myopic (≤ −0.5 D) included Rottweiler, Collie, Miniature Schnauzer, and Toy Poodle. Degree of myopia increased with increasing age across all breeds. Breeds in which the mean refractive state was hyperopic (≥ +0.5 D) included Australian Shepherd, Alaskan Malamute, and Bouvier des Flandres. Astigmatism was detected in 1% (14/1,440) of adult (≥ 1 year of age) dogs; prevalence of astigmatism among German Shepherd Dogs was 3.3% (3/90). Anisometropia was detected in 6% (87/1,440) of all dogs and in 8.9% (8/90) of German Shepherd Dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Refractive states of canine eyes varied widely and were influenced by breed and age. In dogs expected to have high visual function (eg, performance dogs), determination of refractive state is recommended prior to intensive training.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop and compare 3 techniques for retrobulbar injection of local anesthetic agents for ocular surgery and analgesia in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—17 dogs (including 9 cadavers).

Procedures—Inferior-temporal palpebral (ITP), perimandibular, and combined superior-inferior peribulbar injection techniques were compared by assessing the distribution of latex after injection into the orbits of 5 canine cadavers; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the distribution of contrast agent after injection in the retrobulbar space of 4 canine cadavers; and assessment of the efficacy and MRI evaluation of the anatomic distribution of injections of a lidocainecontrast agent mixture in 4 anesthetized, nonrecovery dogs. By use of the preferred technique (ITP), the ocular effects of lidocaine anesthesia were evaluated in 4 dogs; during a 2-week period after treatment, dogs underwent ophthalmic examination, Schirmer tear testing (STT), intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and Cochet–Bonnet esthesiometry.

Results—Of the 3 techniques, the ITP technique was the preferred method for retrobulbar administration of anesthetic agent in dogs because it was efficacious (pupil dilation and central rotation of the globe achieved in all eyes), easiest to perform, and provided thorough coverage of the intraconal retrobulbar space without complication. During the 2-week follow-up period, the ITP injection did not significantly affect STT, IOP, or Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry values in dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs, retrobulbar administration of anesthetic agents via the ITP technique is a potential alternative to systemic administration of neuromuscular blocking agents for ophthalmic surgery and provides the additional benefit of local ocular analgesia.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—6 dogs (10 eyes) with keratitis following long-term topical treatment with a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (CAI) were evaluated. In 4 dogs (6 eyes), CAI treatment was discontinued. Three dogs (4 eyes) underwent enucleation because of end-stage corneal disease. One dog was treated differently in each eye and thus was represented in both aforementioned groups.

Clinical Findings—Following initiation of treatment with a CAI (ie, brinzolamide or dorzolamide), the median time to development of severe ocular signs was 266 days (range, 133 to 679 days). Clinically severe ocular signs included ulcerative and nonulcerative perilimbal keratitis or severe diffuse keratitis with marked vascularization. The keratitis was refractory to treatment with anti-inflammatory medications. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination of enucleated globes was performed in 3 affected dogs and in 1 dog with keratitis that recovered. Corneal lesions included 2 distinct inflammatory infiltrates with plasma cells predominating in the anterior stroma and both T cells and neutrophils in the epithelium. Stromal plasma cells and overlying epithelium exhibited strong positive immunoreactivity for IgG.

Treatment and Outcome—Topical CAI treatment was discontinued in 4 dogs after a median of 209 days (range, 44 to 433 days), and in these dogs, clinical improvement was evident within 2 to 4 days of CAI treatment cessation. Signs of keratitis resolved in 12 to 25 days in these 4 dogs, and median follow-up time after CAI discontinuation was 25.5 months (range, 6 to 42 months), during which time signs of corneal disease did not recur.

Clinical Relevance—On the basis of this small series, presumed topical CAI-associated keratitis in dogs appeared to be an uncommon immune-mediated disease that was not responsive to corticosteroid treatment. Affected patients improved rapidly, but only after discontinuation of CAI treatment. In dogs with glaucoma, clinicians should consider the development of punctate keratopathy and severe diffuse keratitis as potential adverse effects related to topical administration of CAIs, even after previously uneventful long-term use.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association