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An 8.5-year-old spayed female domestic short-hair cat weighing 3.39 kg (7.46 lb) was submitted to the Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Georgia for postmortem examination following euthanasia by means of an IV overdose of pentobarbital sodium. This outdoor cat had a 1-week history of lethargy with an acute onset of severe icterus and a PCV of 16% (reference range, 24% to 45%). The cat's vaccination status was reportedly up to date (specific vaccines administered were not reported), and the cat was receiving topical heartworm and parasite treatment. a

Gross Findings

On external examination, the cat had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 9-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated at a private veterinary clinic because of a 24-hour history of not drinking water following routine vaccination against rabies virus, feline herpesvirus-1, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia virus.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Physical examination revealed dehydration; the cat was administered fluid therapy and discharged from the clinic. Nine days later, the cat was returned to the same clinic because of anorexia. A diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infection was made, and the cat was treated with doxycycline and supplemental lysine, PO, for 10 days. Thoracic radiography did not reveal any

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 16-year-old 4.24-kg (9.33-lb) spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated at the University of Georgia's Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of vomiting, which had begun 5 days earlier. The owner reported that the cat was vomiting undigested food 2 to 3 times each day, usually 6 to 8 hours following a meal. Additionally, the cat was reportedly urinating in atypical locations around the house and, recently, had not been as active as usual. Clinicopathologic findings obtained by the referring veterinarian 7 months prior were suggestive of chronic renal insufficiency. The cat's vaccination status (FeLV vaccine, rabies virus vaccine, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Photograph of the liver and spleen from an eastern screech owl (Megascops asio) that was found dead with no signs of trauma. The serosal surface of the liver (L) is covered with multifocal to coalescing, slightly raised, tan-white nodules that vary in size from pinpoint foci to roughly 2 cm in diameter. On cut section (far right), some nodules have necrotic centers (arrow). The spleen (S) is enlarged and largely replaced by coalescing tan-white nodules.

History

A 95-g (0.21-lb) female eastern screech owl (Megascops asio) was found dead in Glynn County, Ga. The bird

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 14-year-old spayed female Vietnamese potbellied pig underwent an exploratory laparotomy after recurrent episodes of anorexia and severe abdominal distention over an approximately 5-year period. The latest episodes had occurred in the 24- to 48-hour period before surgery.

Clinical and Gross Findings

The pig had undergone a similar procedure 5 years earlier because of an episode of intestinal obstruction. During that procedure, a colonic mass was resected and diagnosed as a colonic adenocarcinoma. Subsequent episodes of anorexia and abdominal distention continued to occur after the first surgical procedure. The second exploratory laparotomy revealed another colonic mass located at the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

An 8-month-old female domestic shorthair cat with a 2-month history of chronic diarrhea and weight loss was submitted for necropsy. A local veterinarian had treated the cat with pyrantel pamoate and metronidazole, but there was no response to treatment. The cat was also fed a low-residue diet without change in the clinical signs. During routine ovariohysterectomy, straw-colored fluid in the abdominal cavity and diffuse thickening of the intestinal tract were detected. Feline infectious peritonitis was suspected, and the cat was euthanatized.

Clinical and Gross Findings

The cat was in fair body condition (body condition score, 2/5). Fleas were present

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2.75-year-old 3.3-kg (7.26-lb) sexually intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was evaluated because of mild swelling of the lips and tongue. The monkey had been born at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center field station in Lawrenceville, Ga, and was group housed in a large compound (indoor and outdoor access); it had no notable history except for trauma. It was transferred to Yerkes National Primate Research Center main center in Atlanta for assignment to a renal transplant research protocol approved by the Emory University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and was moved to single housing

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-year-old spayed female English Setter that arrived in Atlanta on a flight from South Africa was boarded at a nearby quarantine facility. The day following its arrival, the dog appeared to be dead and was brought to the referring veterinarian. The dog's rectal temperature was 41.7°C (107°F) at that time, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts were unsuccessful. No other external abnormalities were noted, and the body was submitted to the Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Georgia for necropsy.

Clinical and Gross Findings

At necropsy, the dog weighed 14.5 kg (31.9 lb) with a body condition score

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

An outdoor 5-year-old sexually intact female domestic shorthair cat with a 4-day history of upper respiratory tract disease was referred to a private clinic in June 2008.

Clinical and Gross Findings

No abnormalities were detected during physical examination, but a few hours later, the cat developed bilateral blindness, progressive hind limb ataxia, and head tilt. Considering that the cat had no history of vaccination, the clinician suspected rabies and the cat was euthanized and submitted for necropsy. The carcass was in good body condition. The most important gross findings were restricted to the brain and consisted of a focally

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association