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  • Author or Editor: Elizabeth C. Hiebert x
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A 2-year-old 5.6-kg (12.3-lb) sexually intact male Alaskan Klee Kai was evaluated for a sudden onset of inappetence and labored breathing of 2 days’ duration. Nonproductive gagging was noted by the owner 1 day before the initial examination. There was no history of trauma or previous problems, except an Anaplasma phagocytophylum infection diagnosed and treated by the primary veterinarian 6 weeks previously.

On physical examination, the dog was anxious, alert, responsive, cyanotic, and tachypneic (respiratory rate, 60 breaths/min [reference range, 10 to 35 breaths/min]) with inspiratory dyspnea. Severely diminished to absent broncho-vesicular sounds were noted in all

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An 11-year-old 6-kg (13.2-lb) neutered male Yorkshire Terrier was evaluated for thoracolumbar hyperesthesia and sudden-onset ambulatory paraparesis. A week prior, the referring veterinarian identified signs of thoracolumbar discomfort during a routine physical examination and NSAID treatment was instituted. At the referral examination, clinical signs had progressed to bilateral hind limb ataxia and hyperesthesia with vocalization. Historically, the dog had chronic diabetes mellitus and had undergone bilateral cataract phacoemulsification surgery. Current treatments included insulin a (2.17 U/kg [0.99 U/lb], SC, q 12 h). Physical examination revealed a pendulous abdomen with cranial abdominal organomegaly, bilaterally weak femoral pulses, and symmetric mild

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 7-year-old 6.9-kg (15.2-lb) neutered male Manx was evaluated because of a 3-day history of sudden onset severe nonambulatory hind limb paraparesis and hyperpathia. The cat had been examined previously by multiple veterinarians; findings included hind limb ataxia with hyperesthesia and mild dehydration. Referral abdominal radiography reportedly revealed no abnormalities. Medical management included a single dose of meloxicam (0.05 mg/kg [0.023 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h), 2 doses of dexamethasone (0.72 mg/kg [0.327 mg/lb], IM, q 24 h), and an SC isotonic crystalloid fluid bolus, none of which improved clinical signs. At the evaluation, the cat was quiet, but alert

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 1.5-year-old 4.38-kg (9.6-lb) neutered male domestic shorthair cat was referred because of a 3-day history of retching, ptyalism, and inappetence. Clinical signs were refractory to medical management (ie, administration of maropitant citrate, famotidine, and crystalloid fluid at unknown dosages).

At the time of hospital admission, the cat was alert, responsive, and euhydrated with a body condition score of 5/9. The cat had a body temperature of 38.7°C (101.6°F). The heart rate (170 beats/min; reference range, 120 to 140 beats/min) and respiratory rate (60 breaths/min; reference range, 16 to 40 breaths/min) were mildly high, likely attributable to stress or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 7-day-old Red Angus bull calf with a history of respiratory distress of 3 days’ duration was evaluated. This calf had been unthrifty since birth. At the onset of respiratory distress, the owner administered ceftiofur crystalline-free acid a (6.6 mg/kg [3 mg/lb], SC, once), with no obvious improvement. On physical examination, the calf was dull but alert and responsive. The calf was tachypneic (100 breaths/min [reference range, 30 to 60 breaths/min]) and cyanotic. Mild dehydration and scleral injection were present. On auscultation of the thorax, lung sounds were increased on the left side and markedly decreased to absent

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association