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  • Author or Editor: Elizabeth A. Maxwell x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy of application of an alcohol-based antiseptic (80% ethyl alcohol) hand rub (ABAHR) with that of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate scrub (CGS2) for immediate reduction of the bacterial population on the skin of dogs.

ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs with no evidence of skin disease.

PROCEDURES On each dog, 2 areas of hair on the ventral aspect of the abdomen were clipped with a No. 40 blade and cleared of debris. A direct contact plate holding tryptic soy agar with polysorbate 80 and lecithin was gently pressed (for 2 seconds) on each skin site (preapplication sample). The CGS2 and ABAHR were each aseptically applied to 1 skin site on each dog. A direct contact plate was subsequently applied to each site in a similar manner (postapplication sample). All plates were cultured, and bacterial isolates were identified and quantified by the number of CFUs per plate.

RESULTS Application of the CGS2 and ABAHR significantly decreased skin bacterial colony counts, compared with findings for preapplication samples. The number of CFUs per plate or postapplication percentage reduction in CFUs per plate did not differ between treatments. There were no adverse skin reactions associated with either application.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that applications of ABAHR and CGS2 were equally effective at immediately reducing the bacterial population on the skin of dogs, and there was no significant difference in percentage reduction in colony counts between the 2 applications.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize spatial release of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CI-CSH) beads by use of an agarose tissue phantom.

SAMPLE 3-mm-diameter beads (n = 60) containing 4.6 mg of carboplatin (2.4 mg of platinum)/bead.

PROCEDURES 18 L of 1% agarose was prepared and poured into 36 containers (10 × 10 × 10 cm), each of which was filled half full (0.5 L/container). After the agarose solidified, 1, 3, 6, or 10 CI-CSH beads were placed on the agar in defined patterns. An additional 36 blocks of agar (0.5 L/block) were placed atop the beads, positioning the beads in the center of 1 L of agar. The experiment was replicated 3 times for each bead pattern for 24, 48, and 72 hours. At these times, representative agarose blocks were sectioned in the x-, y-, and z-planes and labeled in accordance with their positions in shells radiating 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm from the center of the blocks. Agarose from each shell was homogenized, and a sample was submitted for platinum analysis by use of inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy.

RESULTS Platinum diffused from CI-CSH beads at predicted anticancer cytotoxic concentrations for 2 to 5 cm.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results provided information regarding the spatial distribution of platinum expected to occur in vivo. Agarose may be used as a diffusion model, mimicking the characteristics of subcutaneous tissues. Measured platinum concentrations might be used to guide patterns for implantation of CI-CSH beads in animals with susceptible neoplasms.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the clinical outcomes of the use of acellular fish skin grafts (FSGs) for the management of complex soft tissue wounds of various etiologies in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

13 dogs and 4 cats with complex wounds treated with FSGs between February 2019 and March 2021.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed for information regarding cause, location, size of the wound, management techniques, complications, and clinical outcomes.

RESULTS

In dogs, the number of FSG applications ranged from 1 to 4 (median, 2 graft applications). The time between each application ranged from 4 to 21 days (median, 9.5 days). Time to application of the first FSG ranged from 9 to 210 days (median, 19 days). Wounds closed by second-intention healing following the first fish skin application between 26 and 145 days (median, 71 days; n = 12). In cats, 1 or 2 FSGs were used, and the wounds of 3 of 4 cats healed completely by secondary intention. The wounds of 1 dog and 1 cat did not heal. There were no adverse events attributed to the use of the FSGs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

For dogs and cats of the present study, complete healing of most wounds occurred with the use of FSGs, the application of which did not require special training, instruments, or bandage materials.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Radiology

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association