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  • Author or Editor: Edmund J. Rosser Jr. x
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Summary

The diagnosis of food allergy was confirmed in 51 dogs while the responsiveness to a 60-day home-cooked restricted dietary trial (elimination-diet trial) was evaluated. The primary clinical sign of allergy detected and evaluated in all dogs was persistent and nonseasonally pruritic skin disease. The duration of time between starting the elimination-diet trial and remission of clinical signs was recorded. Dogs were then reexposed to diets that had been fed before testing, and the duration of time before pruritus recurred was recorded. The elapsed time during which dogs were being fed an elimination diet before remission of clinical signs was 1 to 3 weeks in 13 dogs, 4 to 6 weeks in 25 dogs, 7 to 8 weeks in 10 dogs, and 9 to 10 weeks in 3 dogs. Findings indicated that the recommendation of a 3-week elimination-diet trial for diagnosis of food allergy was adequate for only 25% of the dogs. It is recommended that test diets be fed for at least 10 weeks before a food allergy is ruled out.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To define the extent to which Malassezia organisms can be recovered from the skin of clinically normal dogs and to assess differences in organism recovery related to anatomic sampling site and to method of collection.

Design

Prospective, controlled study.

Animals

19 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure

The number of Malassezia pachydermatis organisms were determined in fungal cultures of samples obtained from the skin of clinically normal dogs, using an adhesive tape method to obtain samples from 10 sites/dog. Additionally, 3 methods (direct impression, swabbing technique, and superficial skin scraping) that are commonly used for obtaining samples for cytologic examination were evaluated.

Results

Malassezia organisms were found in low numbers as part of the microflora of the skin of clinically normal dogs. Number of organisms differed significantly for various anatomic locations (chin, highest number; inguinal and axillary regions, lowest number). Malassezia organisms were identified more frequently by use of adhesive tape and fungal culturing than by the methods used for cytologic examination. However, comparing methods used for obtaining samples for cytologic examination with each other, marked differences were not detected in our ability to recover yeast organisms among the 3 techniques.

Clinical Implications

Although Malassezia spp is part of the microflora of the skin of clinically normal dogs, it is extremely difficult to detect the organism by any of the 3 sampling methods used for sample collection for cytologic examination. Therefore, anatomic site and method of sample collection should be considered when attempting to make a diagnosis of Malassezia dermatitis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208:1048–1051)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Objective

To compare skin test reactivity of ID injected histamine phosphate in clinically normal dogs that were physically restrained or anesthetized with propofol.

Animals

12 clinically normal adult dogs.

Procedure

Nonanesthetized dogs (group 1) were restrained and shaved on the right side of the thorax. A single injection of sterile buffered saline solution (negative control) and 5 serial dilutions of histamine phosphate (0.05 ml each) were injected ID. Wheal size was measured after 15 minutes. Propofol anesthetized dogs (group 2) were shaved, and saline solution and histamine were administered ID. Wheal size was measured as for nonanesthetized dogs. Hemoglobin saturation, heart and respiratory rates, and times to sternal recumbency and standing were recorded for anesthetized dogs. Twenty-four hours later, groups were reversed, and testing was repeated on the left side of the thorax.

Results

Mean wheal size was significantly (P < 0.05) less in dogs during propofol anesthesia. Heart and respiratory rates were well maintained but hemoglobin saturation decreased during the first 6 minutes of anesthesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Although statistically significant, the difference in mean wheal size may not be clinically important. Propofol anesthesia may be used during ID skin testing in atopic dogs. Further studies to assess effects of propofol on the reactivity of ID injected aeroallergens should be performed before recommending its use. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:7–9)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research